100 Advances in Geodesy


Dear GeoPRISMS Community,

To celebrate the AGU Centennial, the Geodesy Section is inviting the community to submit compelling advances in geodesy in the following categories:

  • Science – research advance, any advance in understanding Earth and Earth processes;
  • Technology – any advance in instruments, field work, hardware or other technological endeavors;
  • Data – any advance in computation, data analysis, data management, software or other related data aspect;
  • Education – any advance in education (formal or informal) or education research (during the centennial time period, 1919 to 2019); and
  • Broader Impacts – any advance in applied science, science management, community engagement, societal benefits or other impacts (during the centennial time period, 1919 to 2019)

We ask that your submission(s) align with the following criteria:

  • a 1 to 3 sentence description;
  • 1 to 3 references
  • the category and the year or timeframe of the advance.

We hope to announce “100 Advances in Geodesy” in the weeks leading up to the Centennial Celebration at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco through our new Twitter feed @AGUGeodesy and through the new section webpage. Additionally, we hope to record the “100 Advances in Geodesy” through the section and during the meeting. The committee does not intend to rank the advances, though we may ask the community to consider this at some time in the future. For organization, we may put the advances in chronological order, so please include a time period for any submission.

Please submit your advances via email to the AGU Geodesy Section Centennial Committee (Vicki Childers, Tim Dixon, and Linda Rowan) at geodesyadvances@unavco.org under the subject heading “100 Advances in Geodesy”. We cannot accept advances submitted via any other avenue.

We reserve the flexibility to have more than 100 advances, to combine advances that are similar, and to place some advances into an honorable mention category.

Thank You,

AGU Geodesy Centennial Committee
Vicki Childers, Tim Dixon and Linda Rowan

NSF/EAR Division Director search


The National Science Foundation is seeking a Division Director for Earth Sciences (EAR) in the Geosciences Directorate. The job announcement is out for either permanent or rotating positions, and currently closes on August 29:

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/539961200

This is an extremely important job for not just NSF, but for our scientific community. We are hoping to attract a very diverse pool of highly qualified candidates, and encourage you to consider this potential opportunity to serve as the leader of the EAR Division at NSF.

If this opportunity does not fit your current professional or personal situation, but you have recommendations of colleagues whom you believe would be strong candidates, please encourage them to apply. We also encourage you to pass along your recommendations to the search committee, and we will contact candidates directly.

Please note that the federal employment application process is different than those in academia, therefore in addition to your resume and general application, you will need to provide a written narrative to address both the Executive Qualifications and Professional/Technical Qualifications as outlined in the application materials. Please get in touch with any member of the search committee if you’d like advice about this part!

Co-Chairs: Kelly K. Falkner (kfalkner@nsf.gov) and Dena M. Smith (dmsmith@nsf.gov)

Thank you for any assistance you can provide us in ensuring that NSF selects the most highly skilled and visionary leaders.

MCS RCN Megathrust Modeling Workshop – Applications close Aug 16


MCS RCN’s Megathrust Modeling Workshop

University of Oregon in Eugene | October 7-9, 2019
Application deadline: Friday August 16

 

Dear Colleagues,

The application to participate in the MCS RCN’s Megathrust Modeling Workshop will close on Friday, August 16. We encourage you to apply here: https://forms.gle/TL8AkvUw9SdQhen59.

The Megathrust Modeling Workshop will focus on assessing the critical aspects of faulting, earthquake sequences and aseismic slip, and megathrust rupture dynamics that should be included in the future Modeling Collaboratory for Subduction Zone Science (MCS).

Our three main sessions will focus on:

  • Modeling earthquake sequences and aseismic slip
  • Modeling dynamic ruptures and tsunamis
  • Geodynamic and surface processes

Confirmed speakers include: Alice Gabriel, Shuoshuo Han, Shuo Ma, Tatsuhiko Saito, Ylona van Dinther, Camilla Cattania, Victor Cruz-Atienza, Jessica Hawthorne, John Platt, Jean-Arthur Olive, Judith Hubbard, Noah Finnegan, and Kelin Wang.

The main workshop will be held at the University of Oregon in Eugene, October 7-9, 2019, ending with a half-day session on the final morning. There will be a special session focused toward early career scientists (ECS) on October 6, with presentations by Roland Burgmann, Eric Dunham, and Thorsten Becker. There will be an opportunity to present posters on the evening of October 7.

Some funding will be available for travel support. More information, including a tentative schedule of events, is available at our website: https://www.sz4dmcs.org/megathrust-workshop. Remote participation will be available for those who cannot attend in person.

Gabriel Lotto, PhD
Program Manager
Modeling Collaboratory for Subduction RCN
Institute for Geophysics
The University of Texas at Austin
gabriel@ig.utexas.edu

Reminder: NSF GeoPRISMS Program Solicitation


The latest (and last) NSF-GeoPRISMS solicitation has been released:

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2019/nsf19581/nsf19581.htm

Full Proposal Target Dates:

August 16, 2019 Type 1 and Postdoc Proposals

March 02, 2020 Type 2 and Type 3 Proposals

The program has delineated three types of activities, which may be submitted individually, or combined as part of one multi-faceted project. The types are: 1) Integrative research projects, 2) Conferences and short courses, 3) Legacy products.

Please note that Postdoctoral Scholar proposals are still welcome, and that Postdoctoral Scholar proposals no longer require two letters of reference.

Please contact Jennifer Wade in EAR [jwade@nsf.gov] or Debbie Smith in OCE [dksmith@nsf.gov] if you have any questions about GeoPRISMS.

Job Posting: Postdoctoral Research Scientist, multiple Faculty Positions


1) Postdoctoral Research Scientist Marine Geodesy & Seismology – Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University 

2) Faculty Positions in Earth History – The Pennsylvania State University Department of Geosciences
3) Tenure-track Faculty, Hydrogeology – The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Geosciences
4) Director of Diversity Programs in Geosciences – The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Geosciences

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1) Postdoctoral Research Scientist Marine Geodesy & Seismology – Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University

Quick Link: http://pa334.peopleadmin.com/postings/3691

Summary Description: The Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University invites applications for a Postdoctoral Research Scientist position in marine geodesy and seismology, and associated instrumentation.

The successful candidate will work with data from recent deployments of ocean bottom seismometers and absolute pressure gauges from Alaska and New Zealand to 1) analyze earthquakes and seafloor uplift associated with slow slip events offshore New Zealand, and/or 2) continue the development of new instrumentation for marine geodesy with a focus on evaluating new ocean-bottom pressure and tilt/strong motion sensors.

Minimum Degree Required: PhD

Minimum Qualifications: Candidates should have recently completed or be nearing completion of a PhD in Geophysics (Seismology, Marine Geodesy) or related discipline.

Preferred Qualifications: Excellent programming and mathematical skills are highly desired. Prior experience in seismology and/or marine engineering and geodesy, and evidence of the ability to conduct and publish high quality research, are required.

Additional Information: Proposed start date is September 1, 2019, with some flexibility.

Appointment will be for 1-year, with continuation pending funding and progress.

Search will remain open for at least 30 days after the ad appears and will continue until the position is filled.

Please visit our online application site for further information about this position and to submit your application, curriculum vitae, cover letter, and contact information for three references.

Columbia University benefits offered with this Officer of Research appointment.

Columbia University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer — Race/Gender/Disability/Veteran.

We accept online applications only.

EEO Statement: Columbia University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer —Race/Gender/Disability/Veteran.

https://pa334.peopleadmin.com/postings/3691

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2) Faculty Positions in Earth History – Penn State Department of Geosciences

The Department of Geosciences at The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA invites applications for two tenure-track faculty positions in fields broadly related to understanding the history and evolution of Earth’s surface, atmosphere, and oceans over a range of timescales. We seek creative colleagues working to understand the coupling and feedbacks between Earth-surface processes, deep-Earth processes, ocean dynamics, and/or climate. We are especially interested in applicants who integrate modeling, laboratory, and/or field techniques and whose research and teaching would complement existing departmental strengths in geobiology, geochemistry, and geophysics. The Department of Geosciences is part of the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (EMS) and, along with the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute (EESI), houses research programs spanning a broad range of Earth Systems Science. Successful applicants will be expected to engage with our research and teaching community by developing vigorous, externally funded research programs, contributing to the Department’s undergraduate and graduate teaching mission, and working to advance equity and inclusion in geosciences. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in geosciences or related field at the time of appointment. We anticipate filling the positions at the Assistant Professor level, but applications at higher rank may be considered in exceptional circumstances. Appointments could begin as early as July 1, 2020. Review of applications will begin on August 15, 2019 and continue until the positions are filled. Applications should be submitted online and include: (i) cover letter; (ii) curriculum vitae; (iii) statement of research plans and vision; (iv) statement of teaching philosophy and interests; (v) statement describing ideas for fostering diversity, inclusion and equity within the department and the applicant’s research community; and (vi) names and contact information for three references. Questions about the position should be directed to Liz Hajek, Search Committee Chair, at mailto:hajek@psu.edu. The Pennsylvania State University`s College of Earth and Mineral Sciences takes an active role in building talented, inclusive and culturally competent workforce. We understand that our shared future is guided by basic principles of fairness, mutual respect, and commitment to each other. Applicants should share this commitment to fostering diversity, equity, inclusive excellence, and belonging and of engagement that creates an inclusive environment in their department/workplace.

To apply, visit https://apptrkr.com/1506653

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3) Tenure-track Faculty, Hydrogeology – The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Geosciences

The Department of Geosciences at The Pennsylvania State University, in University Park, PA invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position in the field of Hydrogeology, to be filled at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor, depending upon the successful candidate’s qualifications and experience. We seek a creative colleague who will develop a vigorous externally-funded research program, teach undergraduate and graduate courses, and demonstrate commitment to advancing equity and inclusion. The Department of Geosciences is part of the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, and houses top-ranked research programs in environmental and climate sciences, geology, geophysics, and geochemistry. Water is an important component of the University Strategic Plan, and Penn State hosts several campus-wide initiatives in water resources through, for example, the Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment (http://www.iee.psu.edu) and the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute (http://www.eesi.psu.edu). Applications should be submitted online and include: cover letter, curriculum vitae, statement of research vision, statement of teaching interests, and evidence, either woven through their application materials or as a separate diversity statement, of a commitment to fostering diversity, equity, and an inclusive environment in their department/workplace. Additionally, we request names and contact information for four references. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in Geosciences or related field at the time of appointment. Appointment could begin as early as July 1, 2020. Review of applications will begin on October 10, 2019 and continue until the position is filled. For additional information, please contact Don Fisher, Chair of the Search Committee, at mailto:dmf6@psu.edu.

To apply, visit https://apptrkr.com/1508765

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4) Director of Diversity Programs in Geosciences – The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Geosciences

The Department of Geosciences at The Pennsylvania State University, on the University Park Campus, invites applications for a fixed-term multiyear faculty position as Director of Diversity Programs. The initial appointment will be for a 3-year term, from the date of hire, with excellent possibility for renewal. We seek a colleague who will build on existing departmental programs, mentor students, and lead, develop and innovate a suite of sustainable research and teaching initiatives that promote and support a diverse body of students, staff, and faculty members committed to inclusivity and equity. Existing programs within the Department of Geosciences and the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (EMS) include AfricaArray, TRiO programs, a joint degree program with Fort Valley State University, Millennium Scholars, WISER (Women in Science and Engineering) and oSTEM (Out in STEM). The successful candidate will work to develop and implement programs broadening diversity, inclusion, and educational equity in the Department of Geosciences at Penn State and within the broader academic community. This work will include: fostering existing and developing new diversity initiatives in Geosciences; acquiring outside funding for projects; an expectation to teach and/or conduct research that is published in peer reviewed journals, reports, and conference abstracts; engaging in professional development leading to national or international stature in the candidate’s areas of interest. Ideal candidates will have experience in multicultural excellence and Geosciences pedagogy, including demonstrated experience working with a diverse population of students and a demonstrated ability to work collaboratively towards common goals with a variety of stakeholders. The successful candidate will work closely with the EMS Office of the Associate Dean for Educational Equity. At the time of appointment, applicants must have either a Ph.D. in Geology or a related field and demonstrated experience managing diversity, inclusion and/or educational equity programs, or a Ph.D. or equivalent degree in Education, Multicultural Affairs, Sociology or a related field and demonstrated experience managing Earth Science projects. We anticipate filling the position at the assistant research or assistant teaching professor rank but applications at higher rank may be considered under exceptional circumstances. Appointment could begin as early as January 1, 2020. Review of applications will begin on September 1, 2019 and continue until the position is filled. Applications should be submitted online and include: a cover letter; curriculum vitae; a statement demonstrating evidence of fostering diversity, equity, and an inclusive environment in the department/workplace; a statement of research and teaching vision; and names and contact information for four references. For additional information, please contact Tanya Furman, Chair of the Search Committee, at mailto:furman@psu.edu. The Pennsylvania State University`s College of Earth and Mineral Sciences takes an active role in building a talented, inclusive and culturally competent workforce, in conjunction with the Office of the Associate Dean for Educational Equity. We understand that our shared future is guided by basic principles of fairness, mutual respect, and commitment to each other.

To apply, visit https://apptrkr.com/1508766

CAMPUS SECURITY CRIME STATISTICS: For more about safety at Penn State, and to review the Annual Security Report which contains information about crime statistics and other safety and security matters, please go to http://www.police.psu.edu/clery/, which will also provide you with detail on how to request a hard copy of the Annual Security Report.

Penn State is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, and is committed to providing employment opportunities to all qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or protected veteran status.

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Please note, new job announcements (usually) will be distributed to the GeoPRISMS Listserv on the 1st and 15th of each month.

More sessions of interest at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting


Please see below for more sessions of interest to the GeoPRISMS Community, taking place at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting, December 9-13 in San Francisco, CA. AGU abstract submission deadline is Wednesday July 31.

https://www2.agu.org/Fall-Meeting

Submit your abstract: https://www2.agu.org/en/Fall-Meeting/Pages/Submit-an-abstract

All sessions are available on the GeoPRISMS website at: http://geoprisms.org/meetings/agu-sessions/. Your session is not listed? Email us at info@geoprisms.org to include your session to the list.

G012. Plate Motion, Continental Deformation, and Interseismic Strain Accumulation

V008. Boom, Zap, and Roar: Multi-disciplinary characterization of volcanic explosion, jet, and plume dynamics

T050. Subduction Top to Bottom 2 (ST2B-2): Processes and Products Modern and Ancient?

MR005. Carbon and Hydrogen in the Deep Earth

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G012. Plate Motion, Continental Deformation, and Interseismic Strain Accumulation

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/74353

Conveners: Donald F Argus (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Jeffrey Todd Freymueller (Alaska Volcano Observatory Fairbanks), Rui Manuel Silva Fernandes (University of Beira Interior), D. Sarah Stamps (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Abstract: We seek studies examining the take up of plate motion in deforming zones and the buildup and release of elastic strain along major faults and in subduction zones using space geodetic measurements, geologic observations, and geophysical data such as seismicity, marine magnetic anomalies, and transform fault azimuths. How can GPS and InSAR be integrated to determine deformation in plate boundary zones?  To what extent can observed elastic strain buildup and past earthquakes be used to infer the likelihood of future earthquakes?  Are fault slip rates from paleoseismology identical to those from geodetic data?  What fraction of plate motion is taken up by fault slip during earthquakes, and what fraction becomes part of distributed deformation off the major faults?  How fast are mountains currently rising?  To what degree do postseismic transients alter the nearly constant velocity of the plates, and how can postseismic transients influence the definition of Earth’s reference frame?

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V008. Boom, Zap, and Roar: Multi-disciplinary characterization of volcanic explosion, jet, and plume dynamics

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/81555

Conveners: Kathleen F McKee (Carnegie Institution for Science Washington), Sonja A Behnke

(University of South Florida Tampa), Mary Benage (USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory), Benjamin James Andrews (Smithsonian Institution)

Abstract: Explosive volcanic eruptions generate highly electrified, multi-phase momentum-driven fluid flows (jets) that can transform into buoyant plumes. Understanding the dynamics of these systems is critical for forecasting eruption behavior and interpreting geophysical and visual observations of the jets and plumes. Unfortunately, these eruptions present numerous hazards and the interiors of the jets and plumes are obscured from direct observation. In this session we welcome submissions that discuss the dynamics of explosive eruption processes from generation to cessation with particular foci on processes that occur in the jet and plume, such as how lightning manifests in a jet or plume, particle concentration gradients and aggregation, turbulent structures, etc. We are particularly interested in studies that use field observations (e.g., seismicity, infrasound, gas, visible, infrared, and UV imagery, lightning, radar, deformation), laboratory and analog experiments, and/or physics-based modeling.

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T050. Subduction Top to Bottom 2 (ST2B-2): Processes and Products Modern and Ancient?

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/76155

Conveners: Gray E Bebout (Lehigh University), David William Scholl (University of Alaska Fairbanks), Robert J Stern (Univ Texas Dallas), Laura Wallace (University of Texas)

Abstract: From top-to-bottom, many geological, geophysical, petrologic/geochemical, and theoretical advancements have been made toward understanding subduction zone processes and dynamics. The term “subduction” was introduced in its modern sense in 1970 and the 1996 AGU Geophysical Monograph “Subduction Top to Bottom” marked a milestone in our understanding by capturing 26 years of early advances. This “Subduction Top to Bottom 2” (ST2B-2) session and a related themed issue in the GSA journal GEOSPHERE (now at more than 60 papers and growing) revisit these issues and re-assess them in light of recent advancements as well as explore new discoveries and advances in subduction zone research. We invite the broadest possible range of contributions, including abstracts considering subduction-related hazards, climate effects, and resources. We encourage presentations regarding processes at modern subduction zones and evidence of ancient subduction yielding insight regarding Earth plate tectonic evolution and processes at depth in modern margins.

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MR005. Carbon and Hydrogen in the Deep Earth

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/85234

Conveners: Cara Vennari (University of California Santa Cruz), Elizabeth Colette Thompson (University of Chicago), Natalia V Solomatova (Ecole Normale Supérieure Lyon), Lars N Hansen (University of Oxford)

Abstract: Carbon and hydrogen both play significant roles in the physical, petrological, geochemical, and geodynamic processes that shape our planet. Yet despite their importance, the degree and mechanisms of the cycling of these volatiles between Earth’s surface and interior remains an area of open inquiry, as is the long-term accommodation (i.e., storage) of carbon and hydrogen in the deep Earth. This session aims to unite researchers from the fields of seismology, geodynamics, petrology, geochemistry, and mineral physics, who actively investigate the role of carbon and hydrogen in Earth’s interior. Relevant topics include, but are not limited to: investigations into the origin, cycling, and fractionation of carbon and hydrogen; seismic and geodynamic studies of their influence in the deep Earth; and experimental and theoretical constraints on the structure, stability, and physical properties of carbon- and hydrogen-bearing phases at extreme conditions.

GeoPRISMS Newsletter Available: Spring 2019

GeoPRISMS Spring 2019 Newsletter

The Spring 2019 GeoPRISMS newsletter is now available online!

This edition includes:
  • Welcome | from GeoPRISMS Chair Demian Saffer
  • Workshop Report | 2019 GeoPRISMS Synthesis & Integration TEI
  • Science Spotlight | The Aleutian arc through and through: How subduction dynamics influence the generation, storage, and eruption of volatile-bearing magmas
  • Science Spotlight | Complex upper mantle structure beneath the East African Rift System
  • Report from the Field | HT-RESIST: Hikurangi Trench Regional Ectromagnetic Survey to Image the Subduction Thrust
Plus
  • Message from NSF and final program solicitation
  • Recent GeoPRISMS NSF Awards
  • GSOC meeting highlights – Spring 2019
  • GeoPRISMS Data Portal Status Report
  • GeoPRISMS activities at the 2018 AGU Fall Meeting

Printed copies of the newsletter will be mailed soon.

The GeoPRISMS Office

Questions? Email info@geoprisms.org

More sessions of interest at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting

Please see below for more sessions of interest to the GeoPRISMS Community, taking place at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting, December 9-13 in San Francisco, CA. AGU abstract submission deadline is Wednesday July 31.

https://www2.agu.org/Fall-Meeting

Submit your abstract: https://www2.agu.org/en/Fall-Meeting/Pages/Submit-an-abstract

Your session is not listed? Email us at info@geoprisms.org and we’ll be happy to include your session to the list.

V027. Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc system:  synthesis and remaining questions

T028. Interplay between structure, fluids, and deformation processes at subduction zones

T034. Multidisciplinary investigations of the Aleutian-Alaska Subduction Zone

OS025. Submarine canyons, channels, and processes that shape the seafloor

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V027. Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc system:  synthesis and remaining questions

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/81027

Conveners: Susan DeBari (Western Washington University), Shuichi Kodaira (Yokohama National University), Julie Prytulak (Imperial College London), Geoff Wheat (NURP/University of Alaska)

Abstract:

The Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) system is arguably the best-studied example of an intra-oceanic arc. The region has been a primary focus of subduction factory studies for several decades. From 2014-2017, four International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) cruises further explored this arc system, with drilling sites in the Izu forearc (subduction initiation), Izu reararc (arc evolution), west of the Kyushu-Palau remnant arc ridge (arc origins), and the Mariana forearc (serpentinite mud volcanoes). Proposals for future IODP drilling in the region are still being submitted. This session aims to highlight recent developments in IBM subduction zone studies resulting from these concentrated multi-disciplinary studies. We invite papers on subduction initiation, the formation and evolution of arc magmas and arc crust, volcanology and arc cyclicity, geochemical cycling, deep biosphere activity, geophysical structure, slab dynamics, mantle flow, and modeling studies. We also welcome papers on outstanding scientific questions that can be addressed in the IBM system.

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T028. Interplay between structure, fluids, and deformation processes at subduction zones

https://agu. confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/75877

Conveners: Shuoshuo Han (University of Texas Institute for Geophysics), Tianhaozhe Sun (The Pennsylvania State University), Laura Wallace (GNS Science), Christie Rowe (McGill University)

Abstract:

Deformation processes at subduction zones span a vast range of spatial and temporal scales and contribute to the long-term margin evolution and mass transport through the earthquake cycle and beyond. Individual earthquakes and slow slip events involve complex patterns of deformation and fluid effects. Various modes of elastic, viscous, and plastic deformation shape the structure across the plate boundary fault zone, and within both the upper and lower plates during individual events and over longer timescales. Numerous recent onshore and offshore investigations have connected fault slip, fault zone and wall rock properties, and highlight the interplay between structure, fluids, and deformation processes in the subduction system. In this session, we invite contributions studying the key controls of subduction zone deformation, structural evolution, the role of fluids, and the associated geohazards. Multi-disciplinary contributions from geological, geophysical, and laboratory experimental studies, as well as modeling studies that integrate observations, are all welcome.

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T034. Multidisciplinary investigations of the Aleutian-Alaska Subduction Zone

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/72464

Conveners: Xiaotao Yang (Harvard University), Tamara N. Jeppson (Texas A&M University), Julie Elliott (Purdue University), Daniel J. Rasmussen (Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University)

We would like to draw your attention to our AGU session: “T034. Multidisciplinary investigations of the Aleutian-Alaska Subduction Zone”. Recent initiatives including EarthScope and GeoPRISMS have generated a wealth of new data in the region, providing a unique opportunity for integrated studies of this dynamic subduction system. We aim to highlight and facilitate such studies by bringing together contributions from geology, geophysics, geochemistry, volcanology, rock physics, geochronology, tectonics, and geodynamics.

Please consider contributing to our session.

Invited Speakers:

Geoffrey Abers (Cornell University), Jessica Larsen (University of Alaska, Fairbanks)

Abstract:

The Aleutian-Alaska subduction zone (AASZ) is marked by lateral variations in the subducting and overriding plates, subduction obliquity, magma composition, and eruption frequency. It is home to 54 historically active volcanoes, a volcanic gap associated with flat slab subduction, and abundant subduction-related seismicity.The AASZ is an ideal place to address a variety of subduction-related questions, most effectively through cross-disciplinary collaborations. This AGU session aims to facilitate sharing of new data and results across disciplines to help elucidate AASZ processes including but not limited to characteristics of the slab; seismogenesis and fault slip behavior; upper plate deformation processes; magma generation, fluid/volatile transport, and eruption processes; and linkages between processes. We invite contributions investigating the AASZ involving geology, geophysics, geochemistry, volcanology, rock physics, geochronology, tectonics, and geodynamics, with a particular interest in studies integrating results from multiple disciplines and/or across scales.

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OS025. Submarine canyons, channels, and processes that shape the seafloor

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/80642

Conveners: Katherine L Maier (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research), Jamie Howarth (Victoria University of Wellington), Jingping P. Xu (Southern University of Science and Technology), Michael Andrew Clare (University of Southampton)

Abstract:

Submarine canyons and channels feed vast amounts of sediment and organic carbon into the deep sea via flows that shape the seafloor. These sediment transport processes, and resulting geomorphology and stratigraphy, can record tectonic, paleoclimatic, paleoseismic, and paleoceanographic changes, pose hazards for seafloor infrastructure, provide benthic habitats, and introduce nutrients and contaminants to ecosystems. Recent studies and technological advances have propelled our ability to link flows with deposits and morphological change, particularly through instrumental and seafloor observations and high-resolution imaging. We encourage multidisciplinary contributions from the full range of submarine canyon, channel, and turbidity current studies, from how sediment enters canyons to distal submarine fans. Contributions may include measurements of turbidity currents and internal tides, quantification of surficial features and morphologic change through seafloor mapping and observation, stratigraphic architecture from subsurface and outcrop datasets, geochemical analysis of deep-sea sediments and organic carbon, as well as physical and numerical modelling.

Sessions of interest at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting


Please see below for sessions of interest to the GeoPRISMS Community, taking place at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting, December 9-13 in San Francisco, CA. AGU abstract submission deadline is Wednesday July 31.

https://www2.agu.org/Fall-Meeting

Submit your abstract: https://www2.agu.org/en/Fall-Meeting/Pages/Submit-an-abstract

Your session is not listed? Email us at info@geoprisms.org to include your session to the list.

V026. Interactions between Magmatism, Tectonics, and Faulting in Rifts, Arcs, Ridges, Calderas, and Volcanic Fields

T034. Multidisciplinary Investigations of the Aleutian-Alaska Subduction Zone

V015. CONVERSE: Community Network for Volcanic Eruption Response – Coordination to Detect Eruption Precursors, and Respond to Volcanic Unrest and Eruptions

OS022. Marine Geohazards

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V026. Interactions between Magmatism, Tectonics, and Faulting in Rifts, Arcs, Ridges, Calderas, and Volcanic Fields

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/72237

Dear colleagues,

We wish to invite you contributing your AGU Fall Meeting abstract to the following session focusing on magma-tectonic interactions:

Conveners: Christelle Wauthier (Pennsylvania State University), James Muirhead (Syracuse University), Joël Ruch (University of Geneva), and Sarah Jaye Oliva (Tulane University)

Abstract:

Interactions between magmatism, tectonics, and faulting occur at different temporal and spatial scales, as they are observed from individual volcanoes to plate boundaries, during single eruptive events or over centuries. However, our current understanding is still limited due to a lack of integrated approaches. Field, geodetic, and modeling studies suggest that earthquakes can trigger volcanic eruptions and intrusions through static and dynamic stress transfer. Conversely, magmatic activity can generate earthquakes via stress changes in surrounding country rock. In rifting events, magmatic fluids can release tectonic stresses and also be influenced by pre-existing fracture zones. Finally, the combined effects of magmatic, gravitational, and tectonic stresses can trigger caldera and volcano flank collapse. We strongly encourage multidisciplinary studies integrating geodesy, structural geology, volcanology, geochemistry, seismology, stress analysis, and/or modeling (numerical and analogical) to decipher relationships between magmatic, tectonic, and faulting processes at different temporal and spatial scales.

We are looking forward to seeing you in San Francisco!

Sincerely,

Christelle Wauthier, James Muirhead, Joël Ruch, and Sarah Jaye Oliva

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T034. Multidisciplinary Investigations of the Aleutian-Alaska Subduction Zone

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/72464

Conveners: Xiaotao Yang (University of Massachusetts Amherst), Tamara N. Jeppson (Texas A&M University College Station), Julie Elliott (Purdue University), Daniel J. Rasmussen (Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory)

Abstract:

The Aleutian-Alaska subduction zone (AASZ) is marked by lateral variations in the subducting and overriding plates, subduction obliquity, magma composition, and eruption frequency. It is home to 54 historically active volcanoes, a volcanic gap associated with flat slab subduction, and abundant subduction-related seismicity.The AASZ is an ideal place to address a variety of subduction-related questions, most effectively through cross-disciplinary collaborations. This AGU session aims to facilitate sharing of new data and results across disciplines to help elucidate AASZ processes including but not limited to characteristics of the slab; seismogenesis and fault slip behavior; upper plate deformation processes; magma generation, fluid/volatile transport, and eruption processes; and linkages between processes. We invite contributions investigating the AASZ involving geology, geophysics, geochemistry, volcanology, rock physics, geochronology, tectonics, and geodynamics, with a particular interest in studies integrating results from multiple disciplines and/or across scales.

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V015. CONVERSE: Community Network for Volcanic Eruption Response – Coordination to Detect Eruption Precursors, and Respond to Volcanic Unrest and Eruptions

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/80793

Conveners: Tobias P Fischer (University of New Mexico Main Campus), Michelle L Coombs (U.S. Geological Survey), Einat Lev (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory), Paul J Wallace (University of Oregon)

Abstract:

Volcanic eruptions are common phenomena and more than 50 volcanic eruptions have occurred in the US alone in the past 31 years. These eruptions can have devastating economic and social consequences. Many volcanic eruptions have precursory signals that last from days to months while the actual eruptive events can last several years or decades. Precursory signals, such as heightened seismicity, subtle changes in gas emissions, and ground deformation, can be detected when adequate ground- and satellite- based observations are available. Observations and samples obtained during run-up and eruption have great potential for providing key scientific insights into the physical and chemical processes that drive eruptions, and obtaining them requires careful planning and coordination within the volcanological community. We encourage submissions that describe successful scientific responses to past eruptions, detection of eruption precursors, and ideas for what future responses could and should look like.

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OS022. Marine Geohazards

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/80421

Conveners: Derek Sawyer, Brandon Dugan, Jenna Hill, and Danny Brothers

Abstract:

Marine geohazards are sudden and extreme geologic events that affect coastal areas and seabed infrastructure on local, regional, and transoceanic scales. The hazards include submarine earthquakes, explosive volcanic eruptions and collapses of volcanic edifices, submarine slope failures, and tsunami generation. The sediment record of past offshore and coastal hazardous events is often better preserved in the marine/ lacustrine environment than on land and can be investigated in great detail with high-resolution geological and geophysical tools. We seek contributions that highlight new results and methodologies in marine paleoseismology, submarine landslide studies, tsunami generation and volcanic eruptions. We also emphasize studies that span the major process domains (e.g., the shoreline and the shelf-edge) of both active and passive continental margins, studies that provide constraints on recurrence intervals for hazardous events, and studies that link fundamental geological processes to the assessment of marine geohazards.

Job Posting: Faculty Position


Assistant (Tenure-Track) or Associate (Tenured) Professor in Solid Earth Geophysics – Jackson School of Geosciences at The University of Texas at Austin

The Department of Geological Sciences in the Jackson School of Geosciences at The University of Texas at Austin seeks to hire a faculty member in the field of solid Earth geophysics at the Assistant (tenure-track) or Associate Professor (tenured) level. We are looking for an outstanding scientist who will establish an innovative, externally-funded research program and will be committed to both teaching and mentoring at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The successful applicant is expected to develop a vibrant research program that contributes to the understanding of the dynamics and evolution of the solid Earth and complements existing strengths within the Jackson School. Areas of specialization might include, but are not limited to, seismology, geodesy, and geodynamics.  Review of applications will begin September 1, 2019 and will continue until the position is filled.

The Department of Geological Sciences is part of the Jackson School of Geosciences (JSG), which also includes two research units, the Institute for Geophysics and the Bureau of Economic Geology. With over 190 research scientists and faculty, the Jackson School of Geosciences is one of the largest academic earth science schools in the country. The University of Texas is also home to the Oden Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences and the Texas Advanced Computing Center. The University is located in a thriving metropolitan area with a dynamic, multicultural community of over 1 million people. The department is interested in building a culturally diverse intellectual community and we strongly encourage applications from all underrepresented groups. The University of Texas at Austin is an Equal Opportunity Employer with a commitment to diversity at all levels.

Interested applicants should submit a cover letter, CV, research statement, teaching statement, statement addressing past and/or potential contributions to diversity through research, teaching, and or service, and a list of at least three individuals who would be able to provide letters of reference. Submit copies of these materials online at https://apply.interfolio.com/63707 . Questions concerning the application process or receipt of application materials should be sent to Patrick Stafford (stafford.patrick@jsg.utexas.edu).