Job Posting: Visiting Assistant Professor, Postdoc Position, Doctoral Award


1) Postdoctoral Position: Portable UV Laser Microsampling for ICP-MS Studies of Glass and Ceramic Art – Yale University

2) Dalhousie Earth Sciences Doctoral Award – Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada
3) Visiting Assistant Professor – Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida

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1) Postdoctoral Position: Portable UV Laser Microsampling for ICP-MS Studies of Glass and Ceramic Art – Yale University

The Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage (IPCH), at Yale University, is seeking a scientist at the postdoctoral associate level to focus on the refinement and application of a portable ultraviolet (UV) laser ablation micro-sampling tool for elemental and isotopic studies of glass and ceramic objects. The project involves the use of ICP-MS facilities at Yale’s Department of Geology & Geophysics to quantitatively assess the performance of the existing prototype. Additionally, the postdoctoral associate will collaborate on the application of the sampling tool and analytical method to the study of objects, preferably made of glass, in the American Decorative Arts collection of the Yale University Art Gallery. This position offers the successful candidate the opportunity to work intensively with museum scientists, conservators, curators, scholars and students, while developing skills and experience that may be applicable in geology, mineralogy, paleontology, archaeometry, forensics, material culture studies, conservation science, etc.

Position and application information

The postdoctoral associate position is a full-time, 12-month position (renewable). The starting date is negotiable; a date in or before July 2019 is preferred. Salary will be based on Yale’s guidelines for postdoctoral positions (https://postdocs.yale.edu/postdocs/salaries-taxes). For a description of benefits, including health insurance, see https://postdocs.yale.edu/postdocs/benefits. Support for travel associated with projects is provided. This position is based at Yale’s West Campus, on the border of West Haven and Orange CT, and at the Yale Metal Geochemistry Center on Central Campus. The position also requires visits to Yale’s collections and conservation facilities on Central Campus. There is a free shuttle service between Yale’s campuses.

About the Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage

The Institute is a research collaborative, dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of material culture. Our research decodes art and artifacts, enabling scholars across disciplines to incisively interpret origins and histories. Fundamental to this work is understanding and managing change, especially deterioration and its detection, monitoring, and treatment. We also develop tools and methodologies that enable new modes of studying art and artifacts. Facilities include a variety of ED-XRF instruments, optical microscopes, FTIR microscope, Raman microscope, SEM/EDS, GC/MS, UV/Vis spectroscopy, and an array of accelerated aging and mechanical testing equipment. In addition to scientific laboratories, the IPCH also houses the Conservation Laboratory and the Digitization Laboratory, which are collaborative spaces providing infrastructure, equipment, and expertise to Yale’s collections and researchers pursuing the examination, documentation and conservation treatment of objects. IPCH staff has easy access to the West Campus Materials Characterization Core, which includes XPS, FE-SEM-EDS, XRD and WD-XRF facilities. The Yale Metal Geochemistry Center includes two class ten clean rooms, two multi-collector ICP-MS systems, one single-collector ICP-MS system, and one multi-collector TIMS system.

Required qualifications

  • Completion of a PhD in the chemical, physical, earth or archaeological sciences.
  • Expertise with ICP-MS.
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills, organizational skills, and a desire to work collaboratively.
  • Curiosity about art, artifacts, or archival materials and an interest in engaging with museums and collections.

Preferred qualifications

  • Familiarity with geochemical analyses and isotopic studies is highly desirable.
  • Prior experience with the application of analytical techniques to cultural heritage objects is desirable but not required.

 Application process

  • The closing date for applications is March 3, 2019; review will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled.
  • Applicants should submit a cover letter describing their interest in the position, a CV, and the names of and contact information for two references to Pablo Londero (pablo.londero@yale.edu), Conservation Scientist, Technical Studies Laboratory, Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage.
  • Questions can be emailed directly to Pablo Londero (pablo.londero@yale.edu).

Yale University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer. Yale values diversity among its students, staff, and faculty and strongly welcomes applications from women, persons with disabilities, protected veterans, and underrepresented minorities.

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2) Dalhousie Earth Sciences Doctoral Award – Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada

The Department of Earth Science at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada, invites applications for the Dalhousie Earth Sciences Doctoral Award for admission to the Ph.D. program in Fall 2019. This award provides financial support to outstanding Canadian and International students with a demonstrated record of academic success in their undergraduate and early graduate studies.

The successful applicant will be awarded a competitive Ph.D. funding package, which covers tuition (and differential fees for international students), fees, and includes a stipend for living expenses of $19,000 CAD/year. The award is guaranteed for two years, then subject to renewal for the 3rd and 4th years based on student performance.

The Department has a long history of demonstrated excellence in Earth Science research and teaching, with a current emphasis on marine geology/geophysics, petroleum systems, tectonics, high temperature and experimental geochemistry/petrology and earth surface processes. It hosts various analytical and experimental facilities including the newly‐established National Seismic Imaging Facility, and recently upgraded and expanded facilities for cosmogenic isotope sample preparation. The main campus is situated in Halifax – a city known for its youthful spirit, rich history, and scenic waterfront. Interested students should explore our website (https://www.dal.ca/faculty/science/earth-sciences/faculty_staff/faculty.html).

The minimum qualifications for the award are the successful completion of a BSc degree (MSc preferred) with a minimum cumulative GPA of 4.0 (“A” equivalent).

A complete application will consist of the following:

Submitted to the department electronically by the applicant:

  1. completed Dalhousie Long Form Scholarship Application – Doctoral (downloaded from: https://www.dal.ca/faculty/science/earth-sciences/programs/graduate_information1/es_doc_award.html).

Arranged by the applicant (submitted directly to the department on behalf of the applicant):

  1. Academic transcripts (hard copies directly from the issuing institution)
  2. Completed Harmonized reference assessments from two individuals familiar with your academic and research capability (downloaded from https://www.dal.ca/faculty/science/earth-sciences/programs/graduate_information1/es_doc_award.html).

Please email electronic copies to:

Ms. Norma Keeping (Graduate Administrator)
Email: norma.keeping@dal.ca
Subject line: Earth Science Doctoral Award Application

Hard copies (academic transcripts) to:

Graduate Affairs Committee
c/o Ms. Norma Keeping (Graduate Administrator)
Department of Earth Science
Dalhousie University
Halifax, Nova Scotia
Canada, B3H 4H6A
The deadline for applications is February 15, 2019.
The successful candidate with be notified by March 1, 2019.

For more information, please contact Professor Yana Fedortchouk, Graduate Coordinator, Department of Earth Sciences at Dalhousie University, email: yana@dal.ca

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3) Visiting Assistant Professor – Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida

The Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Florida (geology.ufl.edu) invites applications for the position of Visiting Assistant Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences with an anticipated start date of August 16, 2019.  This is a full-time, nine-month, time-limited, non-tenure accruing with the possibility of renewal for one additional academic year contingent on satisfactory performance, conduct, and funding.  Opportunities exist for summer employment at the University. The successful candidate will have completed a Ph.D. by August 15, 2019. We seek candidates whose research interests overlap with current faculty and show strong promise in research and teaching. For complete information about this position, including required qualifications and applications materials, please visit: http://apply.interfolio.com/59465. The Search Committee will begin reviewing applications on January 28, 2019 and continue accepting applications until the position is filled. Inquiries can be directed to the Search Committee Chair, Dr. Peter Adams (adamsp@ufl.edu).

The University of Florida is an Equal Opportunity Institution

Call for Participation in Marine EM Survey of Fluids in the Alaskan Megathrust aboard the R/V Sikuliaq


Call for Participation in Marine EM Survey of Fluids in the Alaskan Megathrust aboard the R/V Sikuliaq

Application Deadline: January 15, 2019

We invite applications from graduate students, postdocs and early-career scientists to participate in a NSF-funded experiment to image fluids in the Alaskan subduction zone using marine electromagnetic methods. This project will collect seafloor magnetotelluric data and deep-towed controlled-source electromagnetic data along a series of profiles crossing the subduction zone off the Alaska Peninsula. These data will be used to constrain the hydration state of the incoming plate at the trench outer-rise, the distribution of fluids along the plate-interface beneath the forearc, and the release of fluids into the overlying forearc crust, with the goal of understanding how the transport and release of fluids along the plate boundary may regulate earthquake behavior and plate slip.

The research cruise is scheduled from May 21 to June 19, 2019, and will depart from and return to Seward, Alaska.

During the cruise we will run data acquisition training where participants will learn how to prepare, deploy and recover ocean-bottom electromagnetic receivers and how to deep-tow a controlled-source electromagnetic transmitter system. One profile of data will be made available to the participants and post-cruise we will work with the participants on data analysis and interpretation.

Applicants do not need to have previous seagoing experience or experience with electromagnetic geophysics. We hope that this research cruise will provide opportunities to become familiar with marine electromagnetic methods and data interpretation. Funds are available to cover travel and subsistence costs for US-based scientists.

To apply to participate, please submit an application package consisting of a CV (up to 2 pages long) and a statement of interest and experience (1 page or less) and email it to Kerry Key (kkey (at) ldeo.columbia.edu). Questions about the opportunity can be sent to Rob Evans (revans (at) whoi.edu) ahead of the deadline. Applications by graduate students and postdocs require a brief letter of support from the graduate advisor/mentor. Applicants will be selected based on the broad relevance of this project and/or type of data to their current research and career objectives.

2019 UK RiftVolc Consortium – save the date


Conference and workshop announcement

The UK RiftVolc Consortium is running a 3 day Conference in Hawassa, Ethiopia, 9-11 January 2019, to celebrate the culmination of this 5-year project.

Hawassa is a growing city alongside one of the beautiful lakes in the region of the East African rift dominated by lakes and caldera-forming volcanoes, several of which are being explored or exploited for geothermal energy. This will be a wide-ranging meeting on magmatic rifting, with invited speakers as well as speakers from within the Consortium. There will be sessions covering the geological and eruptive history of the region, magmatic processes, geophysical imaging, monitoring of volcanic centres, and current and future hazard. We welcome attendance from all interested scientists, and there will be the opportunity for both oral and poster contributions. There will be a day-long field trip to local sites of scientific interest on 12 January.

Hawassa has its own airport with regular connections to Addis Ababa, but is also accessible by road. The meeting will be fully residential in a hotel with a conference centre.

To be added to the mailing list to receive further information as it becomes available, please send a message to hawassa@ed.ac.uk.

Associated with the meeting, there will also be a 2-day Geohazards Workshop in Addis Ababa on 14-15 January 2019, focussing on science into protocols and policy, and response in the case of a geohazard warning or alert. This will be by invitation only, but please let us know if you would like to be considered.

SAVE THE DATE: 2019 GeoPRISMS Synthesis & Integration TEI


Please save the date and plan to attend the GeoPRISMS Synthesis & Integration Theoretical and Experimental Institute!

February 27- March 1, 2019
Hotel Menger, San Antonio, Texas
Questions should be directed to the GeoPRISMS Office at info at geoprisms.org

The 2019 GeoPRISMS Theoretical and Experimental Institute (TEI) will represent an opportunity for our community to synthesize results from the Rift Initiation and Evolution Initiative (RIE) and the Subduction Cycles & Deformation Initiative (SCD). During this meeting we will evaluate what has been accomplished so far in all GeoPRISMS themes and primary sites, and what gaps still need to be filled in the last years of the decadal program. We will also try to identify emerging new opportunities and to develop new research directions for our community after the end of the GeoPRISMS Program. The three-day meeting will be preceded by an Early-Career Investigator symposium on Tuesday February 26.

Key objectives that the workshop will try to achieve:
  • Set the stage for legacy of GeoPRISMS, develop concrete ideas for legacy products or activities in the coming 2-3 years. This should include both science and Education and Outreach.
  • The meeting program should identify the outstanding process-based questions and cross-cutting themes that engage both RIE and SCD communities. These burning science questions can help guide the integration of science results from GeoPRISMS, and it can lead to future proposals and funding opportunities.
  • The Early Career Investigator (ECI) symposium will foster cross-disciplinary collaborations among young scientists. This symposium will be led by two young scientists in our community.
  • The synthesis workshop will help position our science community for future years. We can evaluate the role that large research infrastructure will play, how science goals of the GeoPRISMS program can be met in other initiatives such as a SZ4D, and the importance of continued NSF support for cross-disciplinary and cross-shoreline research.

Organizing Committee

     Katie Kelley (University of Rhode Island)
     Harm Van Avendonk (University of Texas at Austin)
     Jessica Warren (University of Delaware)
     Kyle Straub (Tulane)
     Rob Harris (Oregon State university)
     Katie Keranen (Cornell)
     Joe Dufek (University of Oregon)
     Christie Rowe (McGill)
     Philip Skemer (Washington University, St Louis)
     Ikuko Wada (University of Minnesota)
     Ex officio: Demian Saffer (GeoPRISMS Office/Pennsylvania State University)

Early Career Investigator symposium leaders:

     Eric Mittelstaedt (University of Idaho)
     Taryn Lopez (University of Alaska, Fairbanks)

Important Dates

More information will become available soon on the meeting webpage (http://geoprisms.org/tei-2019/).
Stay tuned!
 

DCL: Towards a New Approach for the Provision of Marine Seismic Capabilities to the U.S. Research Community


Dear Colleagues:

NSF recently released a Dear Colleague Letter (18-061; 10 April 2018), regarding the provision of marine seismic capabilities. The DCL can be found at this website:

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf18061

As stated in the DCL, NSF is no longer accepting new proposals that require use of R/V Langseth. NSF will also begin developing the activities required for divesting from ownership of R/V Langseth, and it is anticipated that the end of field commitments using the vessel will be no later than mid-2020.

Marine seismic research that is conducted using the capabilities currently provided by R/V Langseth is a key component of the science portfolio supported by the Marine Geology and Geophysics (MG&G) Program within NSF’s Division of Ocean Sciences. Given that R/V Langseth will not be available after mid-2020, MG&G’s immediate goal is to define a path forward for providing long-offset, large-tuned source seismic capabilities for the US research community after R/V Langseth is no longer available.

In the near term, NSF will work with the Marine Seismic Research Oversight Committee (MSROC) of UNOLS to engage the broad community in this effort. A community workshop, to be held in the Fall of 2018, will be the first step in evaluating future research needs and identifying creative options for providing the necessary marine seismic infrastructure. The report from this workshop will help define a plan moving forward for community access to the platforms and tools required in order for NSF to again receive proposals to conduct seismic imaging over the full crustal scale. The workshop will also identify other potential community activities that may be needed to further develop these capabilities.

Throughout the transition to the post-Langseth environment, NSF will accept proposals that include large tuned source, long-offset data acquisition, but access to these capabilities will need to be coordinated by Principal Investigators as part of their proposals, such as through industry providers or international/institutional partners. NSF will also continue to accept proposals to use other seismic acquisition capabilities (e.g., portable multichannel seismic equipment, ocean-bottom seismometers, CHIRP systems, P-cable, etc.). Such capabilities could be provided by Academic Research Fleet (UNOLS) operators, institutions, international or commercial partners, or other means as identified by Principal Investigators, MSROC, or NSF.

Please contact us with any questions or suggestions.

The Marine Geology and Geophysics Program

Candace Major (cmajor@nsf.gov)
Deborah Smith (dksmith@nsf.gov)
Maurice Tivey (mtivey@nsf.gov)
Barbara Ransom (bransom@nsf.gov)
Larry Peterson (lapeters@nsf.gov)

Marine Geology and Geophysics Program Director (Rotator), Employment Opportunity, Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE), NSF


DEADLINE EXTENDED THROUGH MAY 11 2018

Dear Colleagues:

The Marine Geology and Geophysics Program has extended the application deadline for the rotator position (geophysicist) through May 11. Please see the information in the DCL (link below) for how to apply.

*****

Dear Colleagues:

The Marine Geology and Geophysics Program (MGG) within the Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE) in the Directorate of Geosciences (GEO) at the National Science Foundation (NSF) announces a nationwide search for a Program Director (Rotator) with experience and expertise in the broad area of marine geophysics.

The MGG Program supports research in all aspects of the geology and geophysics of the ocean basins, seafloor, subseafloor, and continental margins, as well as that of the Great Lakes. The person selected for this position will work with the other Program Officers who oversee the MGG Program to manage the award portfolio across the entire range of disciplines supported by the Program.

A Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) has been released and provides detailed information, including guidance regarding qualifications required and how to submit an application. Please see https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2018/oce18001/oce18001.jsp

Questions concerning the DCL should be directed to

Candace O. Major (cmajor@nsf.gov) or

Deborah K. Smith (dksmith@nsf.gov)

Thank you for your interest in Ocean Sciences research at the NSF.

Regards,

Rick Murray

Director, Division of Ocean Sciences

REMINDER: GeoPRISMS Townhall & Community/Student Forum at AGU


Join us for the GeoPRISMS Townhall Meeting and Community / Student Forum at the 2017 AGU Fall Meeting!

When: AGU Fall Meeting 2017 – Monday December 11 at 6:00 PM

Where: Westin Canal Place, Riverbend Terrace, 100 Rue Iberville New Orleans, LA 70130

The event is open to all with interests in the GeoPRISMS Program and GeoPRISMS (or MARGINS) research. Come hear updates about the GeoPRISMS Program, the latest GeoPRISMS research projects & study areas, and ongoing GeoPRISMS research from student presenters.

* A short formal session (starting at 6:30PM) will include a welcome and opening remarks from the GeoPRISMS Chair Demian Saffer and updates from NSF Program Director Jenn Wade.

* Luc Lavier (UT Austin) will provide a summary of the Theoretical and Experimental Institute for the Rift Initiation and Evolution Initiative that was held in February 2017.

* Aubreya Adams (Colgate University) and Emily Roland (University of Washington) will present a summary of the Amphibious Array Community Seismic Experiment (AACSE) Project and Mini-Workshop held the Sunday before AGU.

* Colton Lynner (University of Arizona) will provide a summary of the ENAM Mini-Workshop held the Sunday before AGU.

* Andrew Goodwillie (LDEO, Columbia University) will provide a summary of the GeoPRISMS Data Resources Mini-Worshop held the Sunday before AGU.

* Terry Plank (LDEO, Columbia University) will provide a status report and update on the SZ4D initiative.

Student entrants for the GeoPRISMS Prize for Outstanding Student Presentations are also invited to display their AGU posters (or poster versions of their AGU talks) and discuss their research with event participants. This will be a great opportunity for students to share their results further and to interact with a wide spectrum of GeoPRISMS scientists.

There will be ample time to mingle and refreshments will be available. Among those present will be Demian Saffer (GeoPRISMS Chair), members of the GeoPRISMS Steering and Oversight Committee, and Program Directors for GeoPRISMS from the National Science Foundation.

We hope to see you there!

The GeoPRISMS Office

Tomorrow: GeoPRISMS Townhall and Community/Student Forum at AGU


Join us for the GeoPRISMS Townhall Meeting and Community / Student Forum at the 2016 AGU Fall Meeting!

When: TOMORROW Monday December 12 at 6:00 PM

Where: The Park Central Hotel (formerly Westin Market Street) 50 Third Street – Franciscan Ballroom

The event is open to all with interests in the GeoPRISMS Program and GeoPRISMS (or MARGINS) research. Come hear updates about the GeoPRISMS Program, the latest GeoPRISMS research projects & study areas, and ongoing GeoPRISMS research from student presenters.

* A short formal session (starting at 6:30PM) will include a welcome and opening remarks from the GeoPRISMS Chair Demian Saffer and updates from NSF Program Directors Jenn Wade and Maurice Tivey.

* Shuoshuo Han (UT Austin) will provide a summary of her ongoing research on Sediment consolidation at the Cascadia margin deformation front and its impact on shallow megathrust slip behavior.

* James Gaherty (LDEO, Columbia University) will present a report on field research conduted on rifting processes from unique onshore/offshore geophysical and geochemical datasets in the Northern Malawi (Nyasa) Rift

* Tobias Fischer (University of New Mexico) will provide a summary of the Theoretical and Experimental Institute for the Rift Initiation and Evolution Initiative that will be held in February 2017.

Student entrants for the GeoPRISMS Prize for Outstanding Student Presentations are also invited to display their AGU posters (or poster versions of their AGU talks) and discuss their research with event participants. This will be a great opportunity for students to share their results further and to interact with a wide spectrum of GeoPRISMS scientists.

There will be ample time to mingle and refreshments will be available. Among those present will be Demian Saffer (GeoPRISMS Chair), members of the GeoPRISMS Steering and Oversight Committee, and Program Directors for GeoPRISMS from the National Science Foundation.

We hope to see you there!

The GeoPRISMS Office

Workshops of interest Spring 2017


Please see below for several workshops of interest to the GeoPRISMS Community taking place this spring.

A list of workshops and meetings organized by partner organizations with GeoPRISMS is available on the GeoPRISMS website. Please contact the GeoPRISMS Office at info@geoprisms.org if you wish to advertise your workshop on the GeoPRISMS Listserv.

Offshore Geophysical Monitoring of Cascadia for Early Warning and Hazards Research
University of Washington, Seattle | April 3-5, 2017
Deadline for application: January 16, 2017
Workshop on Scientific Exploration of Induced SeisMicity and Stress (SEISMS) 
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY | March 29-31, 2017
Deadline for travel support application: January 6, 2017

See below for more details.

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 Offshore Geophysical Monitoring of Cascadia for Early Warning and Hazards Research

University of Washington, Seattle | April 3-5, 2017

Deadline for application: January 16, 2017

Please join us for a workshop to explore the design, cost, and benefits of a real-time offshore geophysical network extending along the trench of the Cascadia subduction zone. The University of Washington is hosting a meeting for interested scientists and engineers to discuss the scientific and societal motivation for such a system, the geophysical requirements, and the merits of alternative engineering approaches including submarine cables and emerging technologies. Such a system would provide continuous monitoring of the megathrust, enhanced earthquake and tsunami early warning capability, and sustained observations for scientific study. The workshop will also explore strategies for engaging stakeholders and enabling implementation.

Additional information and meeting logistics can be found online (http://cascadia.washington.edu/story/Workshop.html). Applications are due Monday, January 16th, 2017. Inquires can be sent to ewoc@uw.edu.

Workshop Organizers: David Schmidt and William Wilcock, University of Washington

Workshop Funding:  Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

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 Workshop on Scientific Exploration of Induced SeisMicity and Stress (SEISMS) 

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY | March 29-31, 2017

Deadline for travel support application: January 6, 2017

Earthquakes, both natural and induced, remain unpredictable because we lack understanding of the conditions necessary to cause them. In part, this is because direct observation of the basic processes that link parameters such as stress, pore pressure, and slip on a fault has proven impossible, particularly over the pre- to coseismic timescales. These parameters could be measured in situ by borehole and surface-based instruments during an earthquake if they were deployed near to the rupture source. Because it is difficult to predict when and where an earthquake will occur, in order to instrument a fault in advance of an earthquake, one possibility is to induce fault slip (an earthquake) and associated seismicity through fluid injection at an instrumented site suitable for scientific study. A project of this nature would aim to: 1. build an observatory for near-source observations of earthquake processes; 2. establish the physical and chemical effects of fluid injection into the subsurface on fault strength and earthquake source characteristics; 3. investigate the impact of deformation caused by earthquakes on the subsurface physical environment. We invite participants to attend a workshop, funded jointly by International Continental Scientific Drilling Program, ICDP and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), to discuss the scientific merit and practical applications of a field-based investigation into the causes of induced seismicity. The workshop will focus on the types of earthquake science questions that could be addressed with fault zone boreholes in and around active faults, and will evaluate different strategies for making direct observations of earthquake rupture in the subsurface. We hope to bring together academic researchers, as well as industry and government employees, to leverage the data and observations from the recent surge in induced earthquakes in the continental USA and build a consensus on how to fill the critical knowledge gaps our understanding of how to mitigate the hazard of unwanted anthropogenic earthquakes. The workshop will be held at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory from March 29-31, 2017. Limited partial and full travel funding is available thanks to the support of ICDP and SCEC. To apply to the workshop, please send a 2 page CV and a single page statement of interest to seisms@ldeo.columbia.edu. The statement should include your interest in the project and a summary of your expertise. The deadline for travel support application is January 6, 2017. Early career scientists are strongly encouraged to apply to help shape what will be a long-term project.

The workshop description and application instructions are available below and at:

http://www.icdp-online.org/fileadmin/icdp/projects/img/seisms/SEISMS_web2.pdf

Conveners:
Heather Savage, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, USA
James Kirkpatrick, McGill University, Canada
James Mori, Kyoto Univeristy, Japan
Emily Brodsky, UC Santa Cruz, USA
William Ellsworth, Stanford University, USA
Tom Daley, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA
Frédéric Cappa, University of Nice, France
Brett Carpenter, University of Oklahoma, USA
Xiaowei Chen, University of Oklahoma, USA
Yasuyuki Kano, Kyoto University, Japan

DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2017 GeoPRISMS Theoretical & Experimental Institute for the RIE Initiative


You still have time to apply to the 2017 Theoretical & Experimental Institute for the RIE Initiative. DEADLINE EXTENDED THROUGH NOVEMBER 21!

The Theoretical and Experimental Institute (TEI) for the Rift Initiation and Evolution (RIE) initiative is now open for applications. The TEI will be held over three full days from February 8-10, 2017 and is intended to summarize progress and recent scientific advances related to the RIE initiative, and to identify high-priority science for future GeoPRISMS RIE efforts. (Please see the Science and Implementation plan available at http://geoprisms.org/research/science-plan/). Applicants do not need to have worked on projects funded by GeoPRISMS. We expect a broad and diverse audience drawn from domestic and international research communities, including graduate students and early career scientists, who are interested in the initiation and evolution of rifts.

Funding

The TEI is funded by the National Science Foundation through the GeoPRISMS Office at The Pennsylvania State University. There is no registration fee. We will be able to cover most on-site expenses (venue costs, hotel expenses based on double occupancy, and breakfast & lunch) for approximately 80 participants. Most participants will have to cover their travel to and from the meeting; partial funding for travel is available for students and postdocs. We will not be able to provide dinners on-site, but there are several restaurants nearby. Confirmed participants whose on-site expenses are covered are expected to arrive on Tuesday evening and leave on Saturday morning.

Organizing Committee

Tobias Fischer (University of New Mexico), Donna Shillington (LDEO/Columbia University), Estella Atekwana (Oklahoma State University), Rebecca Bendick (University of Montana), Juliet Biggs (University of Bristol), Esteban Gazel (Virginia Tech), Liz Hajek (Pennsylvania State University), Luc Lavier (University of Texas, Austin). Ex officio: Demian Saffer (GeoPRISMS Office/Pennsylvania State University).

Important Dates

October 4: Applications are invited via the meeting webpage at : http://geoprisms.org/tei-rie-2017/
**November 21: Application deadline
December 9: Successful applicants are invited to confirm participation
December 22: Deadline for confirmation of attendance
Late January: Final meeting agenda is released

Location

The Hotel Albuquerque in Albuquerque, NM (http://www.hotelabq.com). The hotel is located 8 miles from Albuquerque airport. Cab service is available.

Student and Postdoc symposium

On Tuesday before the TEI we will hold a student and postdoc symposium which will feature short presentations by attendees and discussion with the conveners and NSF program managers. The symposium runs from 1:00 – 5:00 and will be followed at 5:00 – 7:00 by student posters and cash bar. We encourage all students and postdocs to attend and to arrange their travel accordingly, after confirmation of attendance.

Draft agenda

A draft of the agenda is now available online at: http://geoprisms.org/tei-rie-2017/

Planned Sessions

Rift evolution from initiation to post rift architecture
Magmatism and Volatile Exchanges
Faulting and Strain
Climate and surface processes
Geohazards at rifts and rifted margins
Geodynamics of rifting

Saturday: Field trip to Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument

We will organize an optional field trip to the nearby (~1 hour drive from Albuquerque) Kasha-Katuwe National Monument in the Jemez Volcanic field to look at pyroclastic volcanic deposits and get an overview of the Rio Grande Rift. This trip will involve some light hiking. There will be no additional cost for participating in the trip. In the event of too much snow cover in the Jemez Mountains, we will organize a trip to the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field (~ 1.5 hours from Albuquerque). We will return to Albuquerque by 5 pm.