DLP application temp

Fields marked with a * are required.

Instructions: Please provide as much of the information requested as possible below, and be sure to carefully read the Best Practices document.

If you have difficulty submitting this form, please contact the GeoPRISMS Office. Due to the large number of requests for DLP speakers, and the limited number of engagements each DLP speaker can undertake, not all applications can be fullfilled, nor can all first choices of speaker. Please provide as much information below as possible to ensure your institution has the best chance of receiving a speaker. Upon completion and submission of this form, you will receive a confirmation email containing your responses for your records.


Section 1. Host Contact Information

Please provide all the information indicated below. Please note that this section is required.


Section 2. Institution Information

Please tell us about your institution: its faculty, staff, students, and expected lecture attendance. Please note that this section is required.

Please give us an idea of the size of your department or institution. These fields are optional.


Section 3. Speaker Request

Please select your first and second choice of speakers and indicate the presentation(s) you would like them to deliver (public vs. technical talk). Please note that your first choice may not be available.

* Please note that first choice may not be available


Section 4. Lecture Scheduling

Please tell us about your institution's ideal schedule. It is helpful for us to know both periods of availability and unavailability. This section is optional.

Please indicate up to three preferred time periods when you would like a DLP speaker to visit and present. Please provide the start and end dates for each preferred period. Note that the preferred period may not be fullfilled.

Please indicate up to three periods of time when your institution would prefer not to host a Distinguished speaker. Please indicate start and end dates of non-preferred periods.


Section 5. Other Information

Please let us know a little bit more about your application. This section is optional.


Section 6. Acknowledgements and Submission

Please read the following statements fully and with care. You must agree to them all to submit your application to host a DLP speaker. If you have any questions about these conditions, please contact the GeoPRISMS Office. Please note that this section is required.

Tomorrow: GeoPRISMS Townhall and Community/Student Forum at AGU


Join us for the GeoPRISMS Townhall Meeting and Community / Student Forum at the 2016 AGU Fall Meeting!

When: TOMORROW Monday December 12 at 6:00 PM

Where: The Park Central Hotel (formerly Westin Market Street) 50 Third Street – Franciscan Ballroom

The event is open to all with interests in the GeoPRISMS Program and GeoPRISMS (or MARGINS) research. Come hear updates about the GeoPRISMS Program, the latest GeoPRISMS research projects & study areas, and ongoing GeoPRISMS research from student presenters.

* A short formal session (starting at 6:30PM) will include a welcome and opening remarks from the GeoPRISMS Chair Demian Saffer and updates from NSF Program Directors Jenn Wade and Maurice Tivey.

* Shuoshuo Han (UT Austin) will provide a summary of her ongoing research on Sediment consolidation at the Cascadia margin deformation front and its impact on shallow megathrust slip behavior.

* James Gaherty (LDEO, Columbia University) will present a report on field research conduted on rifting processes from unique onshore/offshore geophysical and geochemical datasets in the Northern Malawi (Nyasa) Rift

* Tobias Fischer (University of New Mexico) will provide a summary of the Theoretical and Experimental Institute for the Rift Initiation and Evolution Initiative that will be held in February 2017.

Student entrants for the GeoPRISMS Prize for Outstanding Student Presentations are also invited to display their AGU posters (or poster versions of their AGU talks) and discuss their research with event participants. This will be a great opportunity for students to share their results further and to interact with a wide spectrum of GeoPRISMS scientists.

There will be ample time to mingle and refreshments will be available. Among those present will be Demian Saffer (GeoPRISMS Chair), members of the GeoPRISMS Steering and Oversight Committee, and Program Directors for GeoPRISMS from the National Science Foundation.

We hope to see you there!

The GeoPRISMS Office

Workshops of interest Spring 2017


Please see below for several workshops of interest to the GeoPRISMS Community taking place this spring.

A list of workshops and meetings organized by partner organizations with GeoPRISMS is available on the GeoPRISMS website. Please contact the GeoPRISMS Office at info@geoprisms.org if you wish to advertise your workshop on the GeoPRISMS Listserv.

Offshore Geophysical Monitoring of Cascadia for Early Warning and Hazards Research
University of Washington, Seattle | April 3-5, 2017
Deadline for application: January 16, 2017
Workshop on Scientific Exploration of Induced SeisMicity and Stress (SEISMS) 
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY | March 29-31, 2017
Deadline for travel support application: January 6, 2017

See below for more details.

————————————

 Offshore Geophysical Monitoring of Cascadia for Early Warning and Hazards Research

University of Washington, Seattle | April 3-5, 2017

Deadline for application: January 16, 2017

Please join us for a workshop to explore the design, cost, and benefits of a real-time offshore geophysical network extending along the trench of the Cascadia subduction zone. The University of Washington is hosting a meeting for interested scientists and engineers to discuss the scientific and societal motivation for such a system, the geophysical requirements, and the merits of alternative engineering approaches including submarine cables and emerging technologies. Such a system would provide continuous monitoring of the megathrust, enhanced earthquake and tsunami early warning capability, and sustained observations for scientific study. The workshop will also explore strategies for engaging stakeholders and enabling implementation.

Additional information and meeting logistics can be found online (http://cascadia.washington.edu/story/Workshop.html). Applications are due Monday, January 16th, 2017. Inquires can be sent to ewoc@uw.edu.

Workshop Organizers: David Schmidt and William Wilcock, University of Washington

Workshop Funding:  Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

————————————

 Workshop on Scientific Exploration of Induced SeisMicity and Stress (SEISMS) 

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY | March 29-31, 2017

Deadline for travel support application: January 6, 2017

Earthquakes, both natural and induced, remain unpredictable because we lack understanding of the conditions necessary to cause them. In part, this is because direct observation of the basic processes that link parameters such as stress, pore pressure, and slip on a fault has proven impossible, particularly over the pre- to coseismic timescales. These parameters could be measured in situ by borehole and surface-based instruments during an earthquake if they were deployed near to the rupture source. Because it is difficult to predict when and where an earthquake will occur, in order to instrument a fault in advance of an earthquake, one possibility is to induce fault slip (an earthquake) and associated seismicity through fluid injection at an instrumented site suitable for scientific study. A project of this nature would aim to: 1. build an observatory for near-source observations of earthquake processes; 2. establish the physical and chemical effects of fluid injection into the subsurface on fault strength and earthquake source characteristics; 3. investigate the impact of deformation caused by earthquakes on the subsurface physical environment. We invite participants to attend a workshop, funded jointly by International Continental Scientific Drilling Program, ICDP and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), to discuss the scientific merit and practical applications of a field-based investigation into the causes of induced seismicity. The workshop will focus on the types of earthquake science questions that could be addressed with fault zone boreholes in and around active faults, and will evaluate different strategies for making direct observations of earthquake rupture in the subsurface. We hope to bring together academic researchers, as well as industry and government employees, to leverage the data and observations from the recent surge in induced earthquakes in the continental USA and build a consensus on how to fill the critical knowledge gaps our understanding of how to mitigate the hazard of unwanted anthropogenic earthquakes. The workshop will be held at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory from March 29-31, 2017. Limited partial and full travel funding is available thanks to the support of ICDP and SCEC. To apply to the workshop, please send a 2 page CV and a single page statement of interest to seisms@ldeo.columbia.edu. The statement should include your interest in the project and a summary of your expertise. The deadline for travel support application is January 6, 2017. Early career scientists are strongly encouraged to apply to help shape what will be a long-term project.

The workshop description and application instructions are available below and at:

http://www.icdp-online.org/fileadmin/icdp/projects/img/seisms/SEISMS_web2.pdf

Conveners:
Heather Savage, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, USA
James Kirkpatrick, McGill University, Canada
James Mori, Kyoto Univeristy, Japan
Emily Brodsky, UC Santa Cruz, USA
William Ellsworth, Stanford University, USA
Tom Daley, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA
Frédéric Cappa, University of Nice, France
Brett Carpenter, University of Oklahoma, USA
Xiaowei Chen, University of Oklahoma, USA
Yasuyuki Kano, Kyoto University, Japan

DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2017 GeoPRISMS Theoretical & Experimental Institute for the RIE Initiative


You still have time to apply to the 2017 Theoretical & Experimental Institute for the RIE Initiative. DEADLINE EXTENDED THROUGH NOVEMBER 21!

The Theoretical and Experimental Institute (TEI) for the Rift Initiation and Evolution (RIE) initiative is now open for applications. The TEI will be held over three full days from February 8-10, 2017 and is intended to summarize progress and recent scientific advances related to the RIE initiative, and to identify high-priority science for future GeoPRISMS RIE efforts. (Please see the Science and Implementation plan available at http://geoprisms.org/research/science-plan/). Applicants do not need to have worked on projects funded by GeoPRISMS. We expect a broad and diverse audience drawn from domestic and international research communities, including graduate students and early career scientists, who are interested in the initiation and evolution of rifts.

Funding

The TEI is funded by the National Science Foundation through the GeoPRISMS Office at The Pennsylvania State University. There is no registration fee. We will be able to cover most on-site expenses (venue costs, hotel expenses based on double occupancy, and breakfast & lunch) for approximately 80 participants. Most participants will have to cover their travel to and from the meeting; partial funding for travel is available for students and postdocs. We will not be able to provide dinners on-site, but there are several restaurants nearby. Confirmed participants whose on-site expenses are covered are expected to arrive on Tuesday evening and leave on Saturday morning.

Organizing Committee

Tobias Fischer (University of New Mexico), Donna Shillington (LDEO/Columbia University), Estella Atekwana (Oklahoma State University), Rebecca Bendick (University of Montana), Juliet Biggs (University of Bristol), Esteban Gazel (Virginia Tech), Liz Hajek (Pennsylvania State University), Luc Lavier (University of Texas, Austin). Ex officio: Demian Saffer (GeoPRISMS Office/Pennsylvania State University).

Important Dates

October 4: Applications are invited via the meeting webpage at : http://geoprisms.org/tei-rie-2017/
**November 21: Application deadline
December 9: Successful applicants are invited to confirm participation
December 22: Deadline for confirmation of attendance
Late January: Final meeting agenda is released

Location

The Hotel Albuquerque in Albuquerque, NM (http://www.hotelabq.com). The hotel is located 8 miles from Albuquerque airport. Cab service is available.

Student and Postdoc symposium

On Tuesday before the TEI we will hold a student and postdoc symposium which will feature short presentations by attendees and discussion with the conveners and NSF program managers. The symposium runs from 1:00 – 5:00 and will be followed at 5:00 – 7:00 by student posters and cash bar. We encourage all students and postdocs to attend and to arrange their travel accordingly, after confirmation of attendance.

Draft agenda

A draft of the agenda is now available online at: http://geoprisms.org/tei-rie-2017/

Planned Sessions

Rift evolution from initiation to post rift architecture
Magmatism and Volatile Exchanges
Faulting and Strain
Climate and surface processes
Geohazards at rifts and rifted margins
Geodynamics of rifting

Saturday: Field trip to Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument

We will organize an optional field trip to the nearby (~1 hour drive from Albuquerque) Kasha-Katuwe National Monument in the Jemez Volcanic field to look at pyroclastic volcanic deposits and get an overview of the Rio Grande Rift. This trip will involve some light hiking. There will be no additional cost for participating in the trip. In the event of too much snow cover in the Jemez Mountains, we will organize a trip to the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field (~ 1.5 hours from Albuquerque). We will return to Albuquerque by 5 pm.

Seismology Student Workshop 2016 at LDEO


Dear graduate students,

You are invited to participate in the upcoming fourth annual Seismology Student Workshop to be held March 17th-18th at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in Palisades, New York. This workshop is completely student-run and organized with the aim of bringing together graduate students who conduct research in seismology and earthquake-related fields. We intend to build on the success of our previous workshops in providing a friendly environment that fosters in-depth scientific discussion.

[This workshop is only open to graduate students, so we encourage advisors to notify their students about this opportunity!]

  • Topics related to the scope of this workshop include but are not limited to:
  • Seismic imaging of tectonic processes
  • Tomographic/inverse techniques
  • Earthquake source processes
  • Seismic anisotropy
  • Seismicity and tremor

The format will be a series of 25-minute talks and poster sessions that take place over the course of the two days. There is a $20 registration fee that will be collected from all participants at the beginning of the workshop. Meals and refreshments will be provided for all attendees, as well as hotel lodging for the nights of Wednesday, March 16th and Thursday, March 17th. Registration is limited to 55 participants, with preference given to those who submit abstracts.

The Facebook page for the workshop can be found here:

https://www.facebook.com/seismostudentworkshop

If you are interested in attending, please complete and submit the online application form:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1boGyXP1aNu40hJWjIcHeHgi2fgDv7N6dNmToBjvBJ3s/viewform?usp=send_form

A title, abstract, and an optional figure must be submitted to be considered for an oral or poster session.

The application deadline is February 12, 2016. We will inform attendees about their application status by the end of February. Please feel free to forward this to other students you know that might be interested.

We hope to see you in March!

Organizing Committee:

Celia, Helen, Kira, Zach, and Genevieve

Please direct any enquiries to seismo.workshop@gmail.com

[GeoPRISMS] Future Directions in Tectonics workshop


Applications are now being accepted for participation in an NSF-sponsored workshop on Future Directions in Tectonics, to be held in Madison, WI on May 20-22, 2016 (see attached announcement).This workshop had been postponed from July 2015 to allow greater community participation and will result in creation of a white paper, designed to help guide research and funding in tectonics over the next decade.

Applications for participating in the workshop and travel support should be submitted by February 19th athttp://goo.gl/forms/ozAhTec0My. Notification of application status will be made by March 18th.

Feedback for the organizing committee on the content and format of the workshop may be submitted at:http://goo.gl/forms/OpLAuWPuw9.

Community-written, pre-meeting “idea papers” may also be submitted by April 8th. Short papers (1 page for single author, 2 pages for group) that outline the perceived top research priorities, grand challenges, and opportunities for the coming decades in tectonics should be sent directly to directions.sgt@gmail.com.

The final workshop agenda will be announced by May 6th.

We look forward to working with you to craft a vision for the future direction of tectonic research.

Organizers: Rick Allmendinger, Marin Clark, Eric Cowgill, Becky Dorsey, Kevin Mahan, James Spotila

GeoPRISMS mid-term review: Figures 4.5 and 4.6

Fig 4.5 and 4.6

Top. Attendance per meeting and cumulative attendance for MARGINS and GeoPRISMS meetings. 2000: SEIZE=SEIZE TEI (Snowbird, UT; January), Subfac=Subfac TEI (Eugene OR, January), RCL=Gulf of California workshop (Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, October). 2001: CR=Central America SEIZE/Subfac workshop (Heredia, Costa Rica, July), RCL=Red Sea workshop (Sharm-el-Sheik, Egypt, March). 2002: IBM=Izu-Bonin-Marianas workshop (Honolulu, HI, September), UM=Subfac modeling workshop (Ann Arbor, MI, October). 2003: Wai=Waipaoa focus area workshop (Gisborne, New Zealand, May), SEIZE=Seismogenic zone revisited TEI (Snowbird, UT, March). 2004: InterMARGINS workshop on modeling the extensional deformation of the lithosphere (Pontresina, Swiss Alps, July). 2006: GoC=Lithospheric rupture in Golf of California workshop (Ensenada, Mexico, January), Imag=workshop in interpreting upper mantle images (Woods Hole, MA, May), S2S=Source and sediment dispersal workshop (Eel River system, California, September). 2007: CR=Subfac/SEIZE integration workshop (Heredia, Costa Rica, June), CAS=integrated collaborations in Cascadia and Walker Lane/Salton Trough (Monterey, CA, March), CL=education mini-workshop (Arlington, VA, April), KIEL=Global data network meeting (Kiel, Germany, May), HAW=Subfac at Izu-Bonin-Marianas (Honolulu, HI, November). 2008: next decade of SEIZE workshop (Mt Hood, OR, September). 2009: S2S Synthesis meeting (Gisbourne, New Zealand, April), RCL=RCL Synthesis workshop (Charleston, SC, April), ML=Mini-lessons workshop (Palisades, NY, May), Volat=Subfac TEI on volatiles (Mt Hood, OR, September). 2010: MSPW=MARGINS Successor Planning Workshop (San Antonio, TX, February), RIE=RIE Implementation workshop (Santa Fe, NM, November). 2011: SCD=SCD Implementation workshop (Bastrop, TX, January), AK=Alaska/Aleutians site planning workshop (Portland, OR, September), ENAM=EarthScope/GeoPRISMS workshop for ENAM site (Bethlehem, PA, October). 2012: CAS=GeoPRISMS/EarthScope site planning workshop for Cascadia (Portland, OR, April), EARS=planning workshop for East African Rift System (Morristown, NJ, October). 2013: NZ=Planning workshop for New Zealand primary site (Wellington, New Zealand, April).

Bottom. Attendance at GeoPRISMS Mini-workshops at the Fall AGU. 2011: ENAM=East North American Margin; CRISP=Costa Rica Seismogenic Project; ExTerra=Exhumed Terranes; GeoInf=GeoInformatics. 2012: Cascadia=Marine Geophysics at Cascadia; IODP=IODP opportunities in SCD; Early Career=GeoPRISMS/EarthScope luncheon. 2013: KATH=Kermadec Arc Havre Trough; Aleutians=logistics preparation workshops; CSDMS=opportunities with the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System; EARS=planning and logistics.

REMINDER: 2015 GeoPRISMS Theoretical and Experimental Institute on Subduction Cycles and Deformation


The Theoretical and Experimental Institute (TEI) for the Subduction Cycles and Deformation (SCD) initiative is now open for applications. The TEI is held on the three full days of October 12-14 and is intended to provide a summary of progress made in the science objectives of the SCD initiative (as discussed in the Science and Implementation plan available through geoprisms.org). Applicants do not have to have worked on projects funded by GeoPRISMS. We expect a broad and diverse audience drawn from domestic and international researchers, including graduate students and early career scientists, who are interested in the structure and dynamics of subduction zones.

Funding
The TEI is funded by the National Science Foundation through the GeoPRISMS Office at the University of Michigan. There is no registration fee. Due to space restrictions the meeting will be strictly limited to 150 participants. We will be able to cover on-site expenses (venue costs, hotel expenses based on double occupancy, and breakfast+lunch) for up to 120 participants. Most participants will have to cover travel to and from the meeting. Partial funding for travel is available for students and postdocs. We will not be able to provide dinner on-site but there are plenty of restaurants nearby.
Confirmed participants whose on-site expenses are covered are expected to arrive on Sunday afternoon and leave on Thursday morning.
Organizing Committee
Jeff Freymueller (University of Alaska Fairbanks), Sarah Penniston-Dorland (University of Maryland), Donna Shillington (Columbia/LDEO), Kelin Wang (Pacific Geoscience Centre), Erin Wirth (University of Washington), Gene Yogodzinski (University of South Carolina). Ex officio: Peter van Keken (GeoPRISMS Office/University of Michigan).
Important Dates
Monday July 27: Applications are invited via the meeting webpage at http://geoprisms.org/tei-scd-2015/
Friday August 21: Application deadline
Friday August 28: Successful applicants are invited to confirm participation
Friday September 11: Deadline for confirmation of attendance
Late September: Final meeting agenda is released
Location
The Portofino hotel at Redondo Beach, CA. The hotel is located just 8 miles (13 km) south of the main Los Angeles airport (LAX). Shuttle service is available for transport from and to the airport in addition to cab services).
Student and postdoc symposium
On Sunday before the meeting we will hold a student and postdoc symposium which will feature short presentations by the attendees and discussion with the conveners and NSF program managers. The meeting starts at 3 pm. We encourage all students and postdocs to attend and to arrange their travel accordingly, after confirmation of attendance.
Draft agenda
The agenda will develop as the list of participants is completed. We will have five sessions focused on different components of the subduction system (each featuring a keynote speaker and invited and contributed presentations) and a summary session. There will be ample time for discussion. We will have dedicated poster sessions in the afternoons.

Sessions with confirmed keynote and invited speakers:

The Incoming Plate
          Keynote: Doug Wiens (Washington University)
          Invited: Magali Billen (UC Davis)
The shallow fore-arc
          Keynote:  Kerry Key (UCSD)
          Invited: Nathan Bangs (UTIG)
The Megathrust
          Keynote: Laura Wallace (UTIG)
          Invited: Rocco Malservisi (USF)
Slab Processes
          Keynote: Brad Hacker (UC Santa Barbara)
          Invited: Pierre Bouilhol (Durham)
Mantle wedge and arc crust
          Keynote: Peter Kelemen (Columbia)
          Invited: Ellen Syracuse (LANL)
Possible field trip to Santa Catalina Island
We may be able to organize an optional field trip (led by Sarah Penniston-Dorland) to Santa Catalina Island on Thursday October 15. This will give participants the opportunity to see amphibolite- and blueschist-facies rocks that have been exhumed from a paleosubduction zone. There is no NSF funding for this trip and participants will need to cover all expenses. We estimate that the cost (including transport from hotel to ferry terminal, ferry ride, transport on Catalina, breakfast and lunch; accommodation at the Portofino for one more night) is around $400-$500 per person. The departure time from the hotel (to catch the first ferry to the island) will be at 5:15am. Cost for participants who do not require an additional night of accommodation will be adjusted. Capacity for the field trip is limited and we will confirm participants on a first-come, first-served basis after receipt of payment.
If you are interested in participating in the field trip please send an email to Peter van Keken (keken@umich.edu) as soon as possible but certainly before the application deadline. We will follow up with details on logistics. Payment to confirm participation will be due by the end of August.

Sessions of Interest at the 2015 AGU Fall Meeting

Please see below for sessions of interest to the GeoPRISMS Community, taking place at the 2015 AGU Fall Meeting, December 14-18 in San Francisco. Note, AGU abstract submission deadline is August 5, 2015.

See http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2015/

Submit your abstract: http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2015/abstract-submissions/

S001: Advances in understanding slow slip and transitional regions
V003: A Tangled Web? Generation and transport of fluids, volatiles and melts in subduction zones from source to surface
V012: Geology, Geophysics, Geochemistry and Biology of Serpentinization Processes on Earth and Other Planets
V014: Heterogeneity in the Earth’s interior: the on-going processes of differentiation
V016: High-temperature thermochronology: theory, analysis, and application to Earth processes
V038: Transport of Volatiles from Mantle to Surface: Insights on Diffusion, Exsolution and Migration of Fluids in Magmatic Environments from Natural Samples and Experiments
V041: Volatile distribution and cycling in the mantle
DI010: Multidisciplinary Views of the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary and Lithospheric Discontinuities
EP021: Mass Extraction and Grain Size Fractionation in Sediment Routing Systems: Tracking Sediment from Upland Catchments to the Deep Ocean
T034: New Insights into the Active Deformation and Tectonic Evolution of the Caribbean Plate
T045: Tectonic, magmatic, and geodynamic studies of extensional processes: Applications in Iceland and the Nubia-Somalia-Arabia plate system
MR018: Pore fluids, faulting, and (a)seismicity

—————-

S001: Advances in understanding slow slip and transitional regions

Session ID#: 8822

For investigators working on slow slip or transitional regions of faults, please consider submitting an abstract to our AGU session:

Slow, aseismic slip provides insight into areas of faults where frictional properties transition from unstable stick-slip behavior to stable sliding. Yet our current understanding of the mechanics of slow slip events cannot explain either their broad diversity, both temporal, ranging from days to years, and spatial, or their implications for earthquake hazards. Additionally, slow slip events often exhibit complex interactions with tectonic tremor or earthquake swarms. Slow slip events also load their surrounding environment, including locked seismic faults, and recent evidence suggests that some large earthquakes were preceded by slow slip signals, indicating possible forecasting applications. This session welcomes studies of slow slip observations, including interactions between aseismic slip, tremor, and earthquakes. We also welcome studies of the mechanical properties or physics of slow slip areas, including modeling and laboratory work. In addition, studies relating slow slip processes to seismic hazards are welcomed.

This session is a co-organized session between Seismology, Geodesy, and Tectonophysics.

Conveners:

Noel M Bartlow (University of California San Diego)

Lucile Bruhat (Stanford University)

Heidi Houston (University of Washington)

—————-

V003: A Tangled Web? Generation and transport of fluids, volatiles and melts in subduction zones from source to surface

Session ID#: 9802

We seek to integrate multidisciplinary efforts to advance our understanding of the generation and transport of volatiles and melts in subduction zones to further comprehend the deep volatile cycle and arc magma genesis. New geodynamic models and geophysical imaging techniques continue to improve our understanding of melt and fluid distribution in the mantle. Ground-truth evidence for these models and images is provided through geochemical, petrologic, geochronologic and field studies of lavas erupted on the surface, and the mantle and crust from which magmas are derived and through which they must pass. Thus the tangled web of sub-arc magmatic and volatile cycling is opening to provide a sharper view. This interdisciplinary session invites submissions from geochemistry, petrology, geophysics, modeling, experiments and field geology that address the temporal and spatial evolution of subduction outfluxes, evidence for sub-arc mantle wedge processes and geochemical exchange between Earth’s reservoirs.

Conveners:

Julia Ribeiro (Rice University)

Christy Till (Arizona State University)

Horst Marschall (WHOI)

Leif Karlstrom (University of Oregon)

—————-

V012: Geology, Geophysics, Geochemistry and Biology of Serpentinization Processes on Earth and Other Planets

Session ID#: 8394

This session will focus on the most recent discoveries of the complex hydration reactions of ultramafic rocks in which olivine and pyroxene are reacted to form rocks that are dominated by serpentine, brucite, talc, magnetite and carbonates and are associated with H2 and/or CH4 seeps. Serpentinization involves volume expansion, exothermic heat release, and crustal deformation, coupled with changes in fluid chemistry and seismic properties of the host rock. New insights into how serpentinization reactions proceed and importance of serpentinization as an energy source for microorganisms have been developed from studies on ophiolites and hydrothermal systems.

We invite investigations that concern different aspects of serpentinization such as physical, chemical or biological processes, petrology, fluid-rock processes, mechanics, kinetics of the reactions, volatile transfer (CO2, H2O, O2, SO2), or studies on carbon sequestration and abiotic generation of methane on natural, experimental and numerically modeled systems on Earth and planetary environments.

Conveners:

Aida Farough (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)

Robert P Lowell (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)

Jeffrey Alt (University of Michigan)

—————-

V014: Heterogeneity in the Earth’s interior: the on-going processes of differentiation

Session ID#: 8060

Earth’s interior is compositionally heterogeneous owing to differentiation processes from early in Earth’s history and through the ongoing recycling of lithosphere by modern plate tectonics.  The nature and distribution of these heterogeneities have implications for the convective vigor of Earth’s mantle, its rhealogical structure, processes of magma generation, and the volatile inventory of the whole Earth system.  This session aims for a multi-disciplinary exploration of the nature and fate of mantle heterogeneities in a convective regime, role of heterogeneties in the melting process across tectonic settings, residence times for chemical heterogeneities in the mantle, and the evidence for primordial reservoirs in the deep Earth.  We encourage contributions from all fields including field observations, analytical geochemistry, experimental geophysics and petrology, and numerical modeling.

Our confirmed invited speakers for the session are:

Kate Kiseeva – University of Oxford

Mingming Li – Arizona State University

Sujoy Mukhopadhyay – University of California, Davis

Jackie Li – University of Michigan

We look forward to your submission.

With warm regards,

Fred A Davis (Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC, United States)

Sujoy Ghosh (Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, India)

Ananya Mallik (Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Bayreuth, Germany)

—————-

V016: High-temperature thermochronology: theory, analysis, and application to Earth processes

Session ID#: 7950

Over the past two decades, applications of low-temperature (< 350 ºC) thermochronologic techniques have expanded to include measurement of cooling histories imparted by near surface erosional, burial and tectonic events. Recent studies of more slowly diffusing daughter nuclides within accessory phases have pushed thermochronology to the realm of higher temperatures, with applications focused on measuring cooling rates at deeper crustal levels. Coupled with cooling rates derived from trace element diffusion speedometry, high-temperature thermochronology has the potential to greatly advance understanding of the thermal, and thus geophysical, evolution of the middle and lower crust.

This session will highlight recent advances in assessing thermal histories at greater depths with the Earth’s crust. We encourage abstracts relating to theoretical, analytical, and applied advances in the field of high-temperature thermochronology and geospeedometry.

Conveners:

Terrance Blackburn (UC Santa Cruz)

Andrew Smye (University of Oxford)

Christopher Spencer (Curtin University)

—————-

V038: Transport of Volatiles from Mantle to Surface: Insights on Diffusion, Exsolution and Migration of Fluids in Magmatic Environments from Natural Samples and Experiments

Session ID#: 8051

The transfer of volatiles (H2O, CO2, Cl, S, F) between reservoirs within the mantle, subducted oceanic crust and continental crust 1) influences magmatic processes, 2) modifies trace element and isotope signatures and 3) may change redox conditions. The physical and chemical properties of magmas are significantly influenced by diffusion and exsolution of volatiles during their ascent from the upper mantle through the crust to the surface. For instance, magma degassing may initiate volcanic eruptions, modulates magma viscosity (especially along the conduit) and, thus, affects the eruptive style. This session seeks insights from natural and laboratory observations involving volatile transfer and degassing. Cross-disciplinary studies (e.g. petrology with geophysics and/or geochemistry) providing temporal constraints, and/or involving volatile solubility, fluid and melt composition, isotope signatures and redox conditions are especially welcome.

Confirmed Invited speakers:

Iona M. McIntosh – JAMSTEC, Japan

Kristina J. Walowski – University of Oregon, USA

James D. Webster – American Museum of Natural History, NY, USA

Conveners:

Sarah B. Cichy (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA; scichy@asu.edu)

Adrian Fiege (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; afiege@umich.edu)

Thomas Giachetti (Rice University, Houston, TX, USA; tg10@rice.edu)

—————-

V041: Volatile distribution and cycling in the mantle

Session ID#: 7967

Session Description:

The amount, distribution and speciation of volatiles (including H, B, C, N, S and halogens) in the Earth’s mantle are crucial for constraining melting and metasomatism, electrical, thermal and seismic properties, as well as geodynamics. How these volatiles transfer from the crust and the exosphere to the deep Earth and back, or whether some of them originate from primordial reservoirs, is critical to understanding volatile cycling through time and Earth’s planetary origin. We invite contributions that address these issues via natural samples, experiments or models from the scale of minerals to the whole planet. Projects centered on any tectonic setting and mantle depth (from the lower to the upper mantle) and geological time (Archean to present) are welcomed.

Invited speakers:

Rita Parai (Carnegie)

Sylvia-Monique Thomas (University of Nevada, Las Vegas)

Nathalie Bolfan-Casanova (Université Blaise Pascal)

Sincerely,

Anne Peslier

Jaime Barnes

Marion Le Voyer

Jessica Warren

—————-

DI010: Multidisciplinary Views of the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary and Lithospheric Discontinuities

Session ID#: 8001

There has been a rapid expansion in the number of geophysical studies that detect evidence for abrupt changes in the physical properties at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) and at additional boundaries within the cratonic and oceanic lithosphere. These mid-lithosphere discontinuities (MLD) and LAB associated boundaries are being discovered in many localities across the globe, though the mechanism(s) underlying the drop in seismic wavespeed, changes in electrical conductivity, and relationship of these observed properties to a rheological transition remain enigmatic. A multidisciplinary approach is fundamental for unraveling the role(s) of partial melt, dissolved water, seismic anisotropy, and/or mineral composition at both the LAB and MLDs. This research is yielding new insights into the growth, stability, alteration, and destruction of plates. Our session welcomes contributions from geophysics (seismology. magnetotellurics, gravity, rheology), geology, geochemistry, mineral physics, and geodynamics that investigate the nature of the LAB/MLD.

Conveners:

Andy Cai (University of Maryland)

Chris Havlin (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)

Anna Kelbert (USGS)

Nicholas Schmerr (University of Maryland)

—————-

EP021: Mass Extraction and Grain Size Fractionation in Sediment Routing Systems: Tracking Sediment from Upland Catchments to the Deep Ocean

Session ID#: 8927

Sediment routing systems carve and construct land- and sea-scapes through erosion, transport and deposition of sediment. Quantifying controls on mass extraction through selective deposition and grain size sorting within sediment transport systems is of paramount importance for predicting geohazards, natural resources, and land/sea-scape evolution. Interactions between fluid, topography and sediment in transport systems subject to steady or changing boundary conditions result in a complex array of local and down-system variability in grain-size. Inverting the resulting stratigraphic record to isolate the key variables can be tremendously challenging. This session will focus on building links between grain size trends, sediment transport dynamics, landscape evolution and basin-scale forcings over diverse spatiotemporal scales. We solicit contributions that use field-based datasets, experimental/ numerical models, and statistical methods to quantify grain-size patterns at a range of scales (from dunes and bars to whole continental margins), and/or temporal changes in grain-size patterns preserved in the stratigraphic record.

Conveners:

Zane R Jobe (Shell Houston)

Anjali M Fernandes (Tulane University of Louisiana)

Nick C Howes (Shell, Houston)

Elizabeth A Hajek (Penn State University)

—————-

T034: New Insights into the Active Deformation and Tectonic Evolution of the Caribbean Plate

Session ID#: 7814

This session seeks to discuss the current state of knowledge of Caribbean plate geodynamics, kinematics and tectonic evolution. Recent studies have quantified how strain is accommodated along the plate boundary, have been able to better constraint geological hazards, and have postulated new models to explain its tectonic evolution. The Caribbean Plate is tectonically active with subduction zones, volcanism, and transpressional zones that produce large seismic and volcanic hazards. The densification of seismic and geodetic instrumentation, capacity building, international collaborations, and collection of new data sets during the past decade are improving our understanding of the Caribbean plate. We seek contributions that use geophysical (seismic, geodetic, remote sensing), numerical and/or analog modeling, and geological techniques to understand strain accommodation along active faults, earthquake, tsunami and volcanic hazards, subduction processes, deformation history, and plate kinematics. This session also encourages contributions on future research directions on tectonics of the Caribbean Plate.

Conveners:

Daniel A. Laó-Dávila (Oklahoma State University)

Alberto M. López (University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez)

—————-

T045: Tectonic, magmatic, and geodynamic studies of extensional processes: Applications in Iceland and the Nubia-Somalia-Arabia plate system

Session ID#: 8278

We invite contributions focused on understanding tectonic, magmatic, and geodynamic processes during rifting at various stages in development with specific emphasis on case studies in Iceland and the Nubia-Somalia-Arabia plate system. Active extension and volcanism along the East African Rift System as well as the adjoining Red Sea and Gulf of Aden spreading centers provide archetypal environments with which to examine both incipient rifts and recently-established seafloor spreading centers. Iceland offers a unique opportunity to directly observe the subaerial mid-Atlantic ridge – a fully-developed spreading center. We welcome petrological, geochemical, and computational investigations of mantle plume dynamics, extension-related volcanism and volatile flux, and magma supply, generation, and ascent. We also welcome geophysical, geodetic, geodynamic modeling, and geological research to better understand lithosphere-asthenosphere behavior, localization of deformation, mantle structure, structural inheritance, strain partitioning between brittle faulting and sub-surface creep, interplay between faulting and magmatism, and time-dependent plate-boundary deformation.

Confirmed Invited Speakers:

Freysteinn Sigmundsson (University of Iceland)

Wendy Nelson (Towson University)

Cynthia Ebinger (University of Rochester)

Oliver Shorttle (University of Cambridge)

Conveners:

Cory Reed (Missouri University of Science & Technology)

D. Sarah Stamps (Virginia Tech)

Tyrone Rooney (Michigan State University)

Ian Bastow (Imperial College)

We look forward to your submissions, and hope to see you in San Francisco!

Best regards,

Cory, Sarah, Tyrone, and Ian

—————-

MR018: Pore fluids, faulting, and (a)seismicity

Session ID#: 7583

Recent studies highlight the important role pore fluids play in controlling fault slip and seismicity. Fluids are hypothesized to be first-order controls on: slow slip in subduction zones, dynamic weakening of mature plate boundary faults, and triggered seismicity associated with fluid injection. We invite contributions that investigate the mechanical and chemical effects of pore fluids on rock deformation and fault slip. Approaches that merge results of rock deformation experiments and field observations to understand geophysical observations, as well as those that use geophysical observations to infer mechanical processes, are particularly encouraged.

Invited Speakers:

Nick Beeler

Bill Ellsworth

Stephen Miller

Paul Segall

Conveners:

Melodie E French (University of Maryland)

John D Platt (Carnegie Institution for Science)

David L Goldsby (University of Pennsylvania)

Thomas M Mitchell (University College London)

 
——————————————–

powered by phpList 3.0.12, © phpList ltd

 

ENAM Community Seismic Data Set now available


Scientists of the Eastern North American Margin (ENAM) Community Seismic Experiment (CSE) gathered marine seismic data along several 2-D lines offshore North Carolina in September and October 2014 using the acoustic source of the R/V Marcus Langseth and ocean-bottom seismometers of the US OBS Instrument Pool that were deployed from the R/V Endeavor. More information on this project can be found on the GeoPRISMS web site for the Eastern North American Margin (ENAM) primary site (http://geoprisms.org/initiatives-sites/rie/enam/), including a web link to download the seismic data from the R/V Marcus Langseth and the OBS data from the R/V Endeavor. The air-gun shots from the R/V Marcus Langseth were also recorded by an array of land seismic stations from IRIS/PASSCAL in the adjacent coastal plain of the ENAM CSE work area. The onshore-offshore data have now been released, and they are available from the LDEO/UTIG Academic Seismic Portal at:

http://www-udc.ig.utexas.edu/sdc/cruise.php?cruiseIn=en546

Processed Endeavor OBS data can be downloaded from the Academic Seismic Portal as well at:

http://www.ig.utexas.edu/sdc/cruise.php?cruiseIn=en546

For more information on the ENAM Community Seismic Experiment, visit http://www.ig.utexas.edu/enam/