More sessions of interest at the 2018 AGU Fall Meeting


Please see below for more sessions of interest to the GeoPRISMS Community, taking place at the 2018 AGU Fall Meeting, December 10-14 in Washington, DC. AGU abstract submission deadline is August 1 2018, 11:59 P.M. EDT.

To access the full list, please visit the GeoPRISMS website at: http://geoprisms.org/meetings/agu-sessions/

Meeting website: https://fallmeeting.agu.org/2018/

Submit your abstract: https://fallmeeting.agu.org/2018/abstract-submissions/

Your session is not listed? Email us at info@geoprisms.org and we’ll include your session to the list.

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V001. Accessorize it! Controls on the mobility of trace elements during subduction

MR003. Connecting Rheology, Microstructure, and Chemistry of the Upper Mantle: New Constraints from Experiments, Models, and Natural Observations

ED001. 3D Printing in Earth and Planetary Science Education and Outreach

DI009. Dynamic Connectors: How Boundary Layers Shape the Evolution of the Earth’s Deep Interior

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V001. Accessorize it! Controls on the mobility of trace elements during subduction

Session ID: 52849

Conveners: Alicia Cruz-Uribe (University of Maine), Maureen Feineman (Penn State)

Session Description: Accessory phases of all types provide key tools for quantifying the trace element geochemistry, stable and radiogenic isotope geochemistry, geochronology, and phase equilibria of rocks in subduction zones. The mobility of traditional accessory phases such as zircon, rutile, titanite, monazite, allanite, and apatite, and perhaps of less studied accessory phases such as sulfides, halides, and oxides, provides a framework for interpreting trace element budgets and elemental fractionation in subduction zones, including volatiles and heat-producing elements. We invite contributions from all aspects of accessory phase geochemistry and petrology related to subduction, from the slab to the arc. We particularly invite studies linking one or more aspects of the subduction factory.

Confirmed Invited Speakers: Dustin Trail (Syracuse University)

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MR003. Connecting Rheology, Microstructure, and Chemistry of the Upper Mantle: New Constraints from Experiments, Models, and Natural Observations

Session ID: 46785

Conveners: Yuval Boneh (Brown), Emily Chin (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego), Katharina Marquardt (Bayerisches Geoinstitut)

Session Description: Together, the rigid lithospheric lid and underlying weak asthenosphere comprise the Earth’s upper mantle. Several features, imaged geophysically and constrained from xenoliths/exhumed mantle sections, characterize the upper mantle. These include complex mantle kinematics (e.g., flow around subduction-zones), enigmatic discontinuities (mid-lithospheric and lithosphere-asthenosphere discontinuities), as well as the cratons stability paradox (long-lived stability with evidence for deformation). These phenomena can be explained through evolution in microstructure (e.g., grain-size, crystallographic preferred orientation), the chemical environment (e.g., water content, chemistry, and structure of grain-boundaries), and/or the existence of melt. In this session, we explore the effect of microstructure and chemistry and their relationships with the strength, deformation mechanisms and tectonic history of the upper mantle. We invite abstracts from a variety of scientific ventures, e.g., rock deformation experiments, analysis of natural samples, and numerical models, to shed light on the microstructural and chemical effect on upper mantle strength and tectonic evolution.

Confirmed invited speakers: Jessica Warren (U of Delaware), Nick Dygert (U of Tennessee)

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ED001. 3D Printing in Earth and Planetary Science Education and Outreach

Session ID: 48843

Conveners: Christodoulos Kyriakopoulos (University of California Riverside), Gary B. Glesener (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)

Session Description: 3D printing is a cutting-edge technology that holds tremendous promise for scientific research and education. For Earth and planetary scientists, the advantages of using such technology includes the ability to elucidate spatially complex geological structures and processes that are otherwise difficult to visualize using 2D media such as computer screens or paper. Concepts around earthquake faults, volcanoes, and trilobites often become more approachable for non-experts when 3D printed because they can be handheld and sometimes physically manipulated. The generation of 3D printed models, including experimental Lab samples (e.g. synthetic rocks), is not only a way to create hands-on educational activities, but a powerful tool to present our data and numerical models to a broader audience. This session focuses on 3D printing techniques and examples of 3D printed models used to enhance educational experiences. Presentations that focus on 3D printing technology, pedagogy, or both are welcome.

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DI009. Dynamic Connectors: How Boundary Layers Shape the Evolution of the Earth’s Deep Interior

Session ID: 52478

Conveners: Keely Anne O’Farrell (University of Kentucky), Tobias Rolf (University of Oslo), Mingming Li (Arizona State University)

Session Description: Mantle dynamics at different scales are influenced by boundary layer processes. The upper boundary affects subduction processes and driving of plate tectonics. The bottom boundary controls plume generation and is dynamically linked to deep thermochemical features, such as LLSVPs and ULVZs. Plumes rising from the bottom boundary layer sample the whole mantle and place their signature on Earth’s surface, providing insight into mixing of chemical heterogeneities and the state of the deep mantle. The two boundary layers connect Earth’s surface, core and mantle interior and govern their interaction. Understanding the dynamics in the boundary layers will help to link shallow and deep mantle processes.This session will explore the dynamics of boundary layers, including generation of subduction zones, plate tectonics, mantle plumes, and heat transfer, and the resultant surface observations that provide useful constraints. We welcome theoretical, experimental, and observational contributions from geodynamics, seismology, geomagnetism, mineral physics, petrology, and other disciplines.

Confirmed invited speaker: Andy Biggin, University of Liverpool