2019 GeoPRISMS Synthesis & Integration Theoretical and Experimental Institute


 Hotel Menger, San Antonio, Texas
 February 27-March 1, 2019
Successful applicants will be contacted soon.  Questions should be directed to the GeoPRISMS Office at info at geoprisms.org
Application deadline: November 12, 2018

AnnouncementAgendaStudent & Postdoc SymposiumFundingMore info

The 2019 GeoPRISMS Theoretical and Experimental Institute (TEI) will represent an opportunity for our community to synthesize results from the Rift Initiation and Evolution Initiative (RIE) and the Subduction Cycles & Deformation Initiative (SCD). During this meeting we will evaluate what has been accomplished so far in all GeoPRISMS themes and primary sites, and what gaps still need to be filled in the last years of the decadal program. We will also try to identify emerging new opportunities and to develop new research directions for our community after the end of the GeoPRISMS Program. The three-day meeting will be preceded by an Early-Career Investigator symposium on Tuesday February 26.

Key objectives that the workshop will try to achieve:

  1. Set the stage for legacy of GeoPRISMS, develop concrete ideas for legacy products or activities in the coming 2-3 years. This should include both science and Education and Outreach.
  2. The meeting program should identify the outstanding process-based questions and cross-cutting themes that engage both RIE and SCD communities. These burning science questions can help guide the integration of science results from GeoPRISMS, and it can lead to future proposals and funding opportunities.
  3. The Early Career Investigator (ECI) symposium will foster cross-disciplinary collaborations among young scientists. This symposium will be led by two young scientists in our community.
  4. The synthesis workshop will help position our science community for future years. We can evaluate the role that large research infrastructure will play, how science goals of the GeoPRISMS program can be met in other initiatives such as a SZ4D, and the importance of continued NSF support for cross-disciplinary and cross-shoreline research.

Organizing Committee

Katie Kelley (University of Rhode Island)
Harm Van Avendonk (University of Texas at Austin)
Jessica Warren (University of Delaware)
Kyle Straub (Tulane)
Rob Harris (Oregon State university)
Katie Keranen (Cornell)
Joe Dufek (University of Oregon)
Christie Rowe (McGill)
Philip Skemer (Washington University, St Louis)
Ikuko Wada (University of Minnesota)

Ex officio: Demian Saffer (GeoPRISMS Office/Pennsylvania State University)

Early Career Investigator symposium leaders:

Eric Mittelstaedt (University of Idaho)
Taryn Lopez (University of Alaska, Fairbanks)

Important Dates

October 10: Applications are invited via the meeting webpage
November 12: Application deadline
Soon: Successful applicants are invited to confirm participation
January 7: Deadline for confirmation of attendance
Late January: Final meeting agenda is released

last update 10/10/2018

Tuesday February 26

Morning meeting of workshop conveners (including leaders of EC symposium)
12:30-17:00 | Early Career Symposium


Wednesday February 27 – Day 1

7:00-8:00 | Breakfast

8:00-10:00 | Early morning session:

  • GeoPRISMS office welcome, status of the decadal program (15 min)
  • Conveners overview of meeting objectives (15 min)
  • NSF program managers update (15 min)

Discussion (15 min)

Summary of SCD Initiative (from past TEI conveners) (20 min)

Summary of RIE Initiative (from past TEI conveners) (20 min)

Coffee break (20 min)

10:00-12:00 | Late morning session:

Talks covering recently funded Research Coordination Networks (45 min)

Discussion (15 min)

Speakers from allied organizations can talk about opportunities in years ahead:
Presentation from NASA Earth Science (20 min.). Disasters program?
Vision talk from USGS (20 min.)
Vision talk from IODP (20 min.)

Possible agenda item: Coastlines and People (COPE)

12:00-13:30 | Lunch on your own

13:30-15:20 | Early afternoon session:

Theme 1: Deformation at all timescales Explain the first of three science themes (15 min)
Topic 1a: The role of structural inheritance in plate tectonic events
RIE: How does preexisting lithospheric structure control the architecture of rifted continental margins during and after breakup? (20 min)
SCD: What are common geological settings for subduction initiation, and what tectonic events precede the development of self-sustaining subduction? (20 min)
Questions for both speakers (15 min)

Topic 1b: Reconciling strain budgets at different time scales.
RIE: What is the role of discrete and transient events, including magmatic diking, in the breakup of continents and the onset of seafloor spreading? (20 min)
SCD: How does deformation across the subduction plate boundary evolve in space and time, through the seismic cycle and beyond? (20 min)
Questions for both speakers, and discussion of Theme 1 (20 min)

Coffee break (20 min)

15:20-17: 30 | Late afternoon session:

Breakout session 1: Deformation at all time scales
Instructions on first breakout session (15 min)
Dividing the participants in four groups and send them to breakout rooms (15 min)
Breakout meetings (60 min)

  • Where do we have gaps in our understanding? What are remaining or emerging science questions?
  • What kind of infrastructure does our community need to address current science questions? What data sets must we collect?
  • Is an amphibious research program required to accomplish our goals? How do we maintain a cohesive community that conducts research across the shoreline?
  • How do we capture the momentum of the GeoPRISMS community? Would a Research Coordination Network (RCN) serve this purpose?

Short, two-slide talks on new research initiatives, possibly highlighting posters (40 min)

17:30-19:00 | Poster session with cash bar

Dinner on your own


Thursday February 28 – Day 2

7:00-8:00 | Breakfast

08:00-10:30 | Early morning session:

Summaries of Breakout session 1 (30 min)
Outcome of Early-Career symposium, presented by ECS leaders (30 min)

Theme 2: Mass fluxes. Explain the second of three science themes (15 min)
Topic 2a: Fluid and volatile fluxes at plate boundaries.
RIE: What are the mechanisms and consequences of fluid and volatile exchange between the Earth, oceans, and atmosphere at rifted continental margins? (20 min)
SCD: How are volatiles, fluids, and melts stored, transferred, and released through the subduction system? (20 min)
Questions for both speakers (15 min)

Coffee break (20 min)

10:30-11:30 | Late morning session:

Topic 2b: Evolution of the volcanic arcs, and the composition of continental crust
RIE: What does the crustal composition of volcanic rifted margins tell us about the dynamics of rifting? (20 min)
SCD: How does the composition of island arc crust evolve as the convergent plate boundary matures? (20 min)
Questions for both speakers, and discussion of Theme 2 (20 min)

Lunch on your own (11:30-13:00)

13:00-14:50 | Early afternoon session:

Breakout session 2: Mass fluxes
Instructions on second breakout session (15 min)
Dividing the participants in four groups and send them to breakout rooms (15 min)
Breakout meetings (60 min)

  • Where do we have gaps in our understanding? What are remaining or emerging science questions?
  • What kind of infrastructure does our community need to address current science questions? What data sets must we collect?
  • Is an amphibious research program required to accomplish our goals? How do we maintain a cohesive community that conducts research across the shoreline?
  • How do we capture the momentum of the GeoPRISMS community? Would a Research Coordination Network (RCN) serve this purpose?

Coffee break (20 min)

14:50-17: 30 | Late afternoon session:

Summaries of Breakout session 2 (30 min)

Theme 3: The stability of margins and geohazards. Explain the third science theme (15 min)
Topic 3a: Feedbacks between tectonics, surficial processes, sediment transport and deposition
RIE: How does sediment influx affect the structure and dynamics of active rift zones? (20 min)
SCD: What are the critical feedbacks between surface processes, fluid flow, and subduction zone mechanics and dynamics? (20 min)
Questions for both speakers (15 min)

Topic 3b: Geohazards
RIE/SCD: How does the record of ancient landslides on continental margins inform us of geohazards at passive margins and subduction zones? (20 min.).
SCD: What governs the size, location and frequency of great subduction zone earthquakes and how is this related to the spatial and temporal variation of slip behaviors observed along subduction faults? (20 min.).
Questions for both speakers, and Discussion (20 min)

17:30-18:30 | Poster Session with cash bar
18:30-20:30 | Conference dinner


Friday March 1 – Day 3

7:00-8:00 | Breakfast
08:00-10:20 | Early morning session:

Breakout session 3: Geohazards
Instructions on third breakout session. (15 min)
Dividing the participants in four groups and send them to breakout rooms (15 min)
Breakout meetings (60 min)

  • Where do we have gaps in our understanding?
  • How do we recognize geohazards in the geological record?
  • Promote synthesis of data from field-based, geophysical, and laboratory studies
  • Future community-based research

Legacy of MARGINS and GeoPRISMS data sets (30 min)

Coffee break (20 min)

10:20-12:00 | Late morning session:

Summaries of Breakout session 3 (30 min)
Archiving and distribution of MARGINS and GeoPRISMS legacy data sets (30 min)
Panel discussion on Education and Outreach (40 min)

12:00-13:30 | Lunch on your own

13:30-15:10 | Early afternoon session:

Group discussion on outstanding research questions (30 min)
Discussion on emerging science opportunities (30 min)
Discussion on synthesis of the GeoPRISMS program (40 min)

15:10-17: 00 | Late afternoon session:

Coffee break (20 min)

Discussion of strategies, themes and focus areas for future community research (30 min)
Discussion on leveraging GeoPRISMS research in other NSF programs (PREEVENTS, Integrated Earth Systems) (30 min)
Future plans for GeoPRISMS (GeoPRISMS chair and steering committee) (30 min)

Meeting adjourned


More info coming soon

The TEI is funded by the National Science Foundation through the GeoPRISMS Office at The Pennsylvania State University. There is no registration fee. We will be able to cover most on-site expenses (venue costs, hotel expenses based on multiple occupancy, and most meals) for approximately 175 participants. Partial funding for travel may also be available, with preference given to students and postdocs. Confirmed participants whose on-site expenses are covered are expected to arrive on Tuesday evening and leave on Saturday morning.

Location

The meeting will be held at the Hotel Menger in downtown San Antonio, TX.

Helpful links

Coming soon