GeoPRISMS Newsletter Available: Spring 2019

GeoPRISMS Spring 2019 Newsletter

The Spring 2019 GeoPRISMS newsletter is now available online!

This edition includes:
  • Welcome | from GeoPRISMS Chair Demian Saffer
  • Workshop Report | 2019 GeoPRISMS Synthesis & Integration TEI
  • Science Spotlight | The Aleutian arc through and through: How subduction dynamics influence the generation, storage, and eruption of volatile-bearing magmas
  • Science Spotlight | Complex upper mantle structure beneath the East African Rift System
  • Report from the Field | HT-RESIST: Hikurangi Trench Regional Ectromagnetic Survey to Image the Subduction Thrust
Plus
  • Message from NSF and final program solicitation
  • Recent GeoPRISMS NSF Awards
  • GSOC meeting highlights – Spring 2019
  • GeoPRISMS Data Portal Status Report
  • GeoPRISMS activities at the 2018 AGU Fall Meeting

Printed copies of the newsletter will be mailed soon.

The GeoPRISMS Office

Questions? Email info@geoprisms.org

More sessions of interest at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting

Please see below for more sessions of interest to the GeoPRISMS Community, taking place at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting, December 9-13 in San Francisco, CA. AGU abstract submission deadline is Wednesday July 31.

https://www2.agu.org/Fall-Meeting

Submit your abstract: https://www2.agu.org/en/Fall-Meeting/Pages/Submit-an-abstract

Your session is not listed? Email us at info@geoprisms.org and we’ll be happy to include your session to the list.

V027. Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc system:  synthesis and remaining questions

T028. Interplay between structure, fluids, and deformation processes at subduction zones

T034. Multidisciplinary investigations of the Aleutian-Alaska Subduction Zone

OS025. Submarine canyons, channels, and processes that shape the seafloor

————-

V027. Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc system:  synthesis and remaining questions

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/81027

Conveners: Susan DeBari (Western Washington University), Shuichi Kodaira (Yokohama National University), Julie Prytulak (Imperial College London), Geoff Wheat (NURP/University of Alaska)

Abstract:

The Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) system is arguably the best-studied example of an intra-oceanic arc. The region has been a primary focus of subduction factory studies for several decades. From 2014-2017, four International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) cruises further explored this arc system, with drilling sites in the Izu forearc (subduction initiation), Izu reararc (arc evolution), west of the Kyushu-Palau remnant arc ridge (arc origins), and the Mariana forearc (serpentinite mud volcanoes). Proposals for future IODP drilling in the region are still being submitted. This session aims to highlight recent developments in IBM subduction zone studies resulting from these concentrated multi-disciplinary studies. We invite papers on subduction initiation, the formation and evolution of arc magmas and arc crust, volcanology and arc cyclicity, geochemical cycling, deep biosphere activity, geophysical structure, slab dynamics, mantle flow, and modeling studies. We also welcome papers on outstanding scientific questions that can be addressed in the IBM system.

————-

T028. Interplay between structure, fluids, and deformation processes at subduction zones

https://agu. confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/75877

Conveners: Shuoshuo Han (University of Texas Institute for Geophysics), Tianhaozhe Sun (The Pennsylvania State University), Laura Wallace (GNS Science), Christie Rowe (McGill University)

Abstract:

Deformation processes at subduction zones span a vast range of spatial and temporal scales and contribute to the long-term margin evolution and mass transport through the earthquake cycle and beyond. Individual earthquakes and slow slip events involve complex patterns of deformation and fluid effects. Various modes of elastic, viscous, and plastic deformation shape the structure across the plate boundary fault zone, and within both the upper and lower plates during individual events and over longer timescales. Numerous recent onshore and offshore investigations have connected fault slip, fault zone and wall rock properties, and highlight the interplay between structure, fluids, and deformation processes in the subduction system. In this session, we invite contributions studying the key controls of subduction zone deformation, structural evolution, the role of fluids, and the associated geohazards. Multi-disciplinary contributions from geological, geophysical, and laboratory experimental studies, as well as modeling studies that integrate observations, are all welcome.

————-

T034. Multidisciplinary investigations of the Aleutian-Alaska Subduction Zone

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/72464

Conveners: Xiaotao Yang (Harvard University), Tamara N. Jeppson (Texas A&M University), Julie Elliott (Purdue University), Daniel J. Rasmussen (Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University)

We would like to draw your attention to our AGU session: “T034. Multidisciplinary investigations of the Aleutian-Alaska Subduction Zone”. Recent initiatives including EarthScope and GeoPRISMS have generated a wealth of new data in the region, providing a unique opportunity for integrated studies of this dynamic subduction system. We aim to highlight and facilitate such studies by bringing together contributions from geology, geophysics, geochemistry, volcanology, rock physics, geochronology, tectonics, and geodynamics.

Please consider contributing to our session.

Invited Speakers:

Geoffrey Abers (Cornell University), Jessica Larsen (University of Alaska, Fairbanks)

Abstract:

The Aleutian-Alaska subduction zone (AASZ) is marked by lateral variations in the subducting and overriding plates, subduction obliquity, magma composition, and eruption frequency. It is home to 54 historically active volcanoes, a volcanic gap associated with flat slab subduction, and abundant subduction-related seismicity.The AASZ is an ideal place to address a variety of subduction-related questions, most effectively through cross-disciplinary collaborations. This AGU session aims to facilitate sharing of new data and results across disciplines to help elucidate AASZ processes including but not limited to characteristics of the slab; seismogenesis and fault slip behavior; upper plate deformation processes; magma generation, fluid/volatile transport, and eruption processes; and linkages between processes. We invite contributions investigating the AASZ involving geology, geophysics, geochemistry, volcanology, rock physics, geochronology, tectonics, and geodynamics, with a particular interest in studies integrating results from multiple disciplines and/or across scales.

————-

OS025. Submarine canyons, channels, and processes that shape the seafloor

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/80642

Conveners: Katherine L Maier (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research), Jamie Howarth (Victoria University of Wellington), Jingping P. Xu (Southern University of Science and Technology), Michael Andrew Clare (University of Southampton)

Abstract:

Submarine canyons and channels feed vast amounts of sediment and organic carbon into the deep sea via flows that shape the seafloor. These sediment transport processes, and resulting geomorphology and stratigraphy, can record tectonic, paleoclimatic, paleoseismic, and paleoceanographic changes, pose hazards for seafloor infrastructure, provide benthic habitats, and introduce nutrients and contaminants to ecosystems. Recent studies and technological advances have propelled our ability to link flows with deposits and morphological change, particularly through instrumental and seafloor observations and high-resolution imaging. We encourage multidisciplinary contributions from the full range of submarine canyon, channel, and turbidity current studies, from how sediment enters canyons to distal submarine fans. Contributions may include measurements of turbidity currents and internal tides, quantification of surficial features and morphologic change through seafloor mapping and observation, stratigraphic architecture from subsurface and outcrop datasets, geochemical analysis of deep-sea sediments and organic carbon, as well as physical and numerical modelling.

Sessions of interest at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting


Please see below for sessions of interest to the GeoPRISMS Community, taking place at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting, December 9-13 in San Francisco, CA. AGU abstract submission deadline is Wednesday July 31.

https://www2.agu.org/Fall-Meeting

Submit your abstract: https://www2.agu.org/en/Fall-Meeting/Pages/Submit-an-abstract

Your session is not listed? Email us at info@geoprisms.org to include your session to the list.

V026. Interactions between Magmatism, Tectonics, and Faulting in Rifts, Arcs, Ridges, Calderas, and Volcanic Fields

T034. Multidisciplinary Investigations of the Aleutian-Alaska Subduction Zone

V015. CONVERSE: Community Network for Volcanic Eruption Response – Coordination to Detect Eruption Precursors, and Respond to Volcanic Unrest and Eruptions

OS022. Marine Geohazards

————-

V026. Interactions between Magmatism, Tectonics, and Faulting in Rifts, Arcs, Ridges, Calderas, and Volcanic Fields

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/72237

Dear colleagues,

We wish to invite you contributing your AGU Fall Meeting abstract to the following session focusing on magma-tectonic interactions:

Conveners: Christelle Wauthier (Pennsylvania State University), James Muirhead (Syracuse University), Joël Ruch (University of Geneva), and Sarah Jaye Oliva (Tulane University)

Abstract:

Interactions between magmatism, tectonics, and faulting occur at different temporal and spatial scales, as they are observed from individual volcanoes to plate boundaries, during single eruptive events or over centuries. However, our current understanding is still limited due to a lack of integrated approaches. Field, geodetic, and modeling studies suggest that earthquakes can trigger volcanic eruptions and intrusions through static and dynamic stress transfer. Conversely, magmatic activity can generate earthquakes via stress changes in surrounding country rock. In rifting events, magmatic fluids can release tectonic stresses and also be influenced by pre-existing fracture zones. Finally, the combined effects of magmatic, gravitational, and tectonic stresses can trigger caldera and volcano flank collapse. We strongly encourage multidisciplinary studies integrating geodesy, structural geology, volcanology, geochemistry, seismology, stress analysis, and/or modeling (numerical and analogical) to decipher relationships between magmatic, tectonic, and faulting processes at different temporal and spatial scales.

We are looking forward to seeing you in San Francisco!

Sincerely,

Christelle Wauthier, James Muirhead, Joël Ruch, and Sarah Jaye Oliva

————-

T034. Multidisciplinary Investigations of the Aleutian-Alaska Subduction Zone

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/72464

Conveners: Xiaotao Yang (University of Massachusetts Amherst), Tamara N. Jeppson (Texas A&M University College Station), Julie Elliott (Purdue University), Daniel J. Rasmussen (Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory)

Abstract:

The Aleutian-Alaska subduction zone (AASZ) is marked by lateral variations in the subducting and overriding plates, subduction obliquity, magma composition, and eruption frequency. It is home to 54 historically active volcanoes, a volcanic gap associated with flat slab subduction, and abundant subduction-related seismicity.The AASZ is an ideal place to address a variety of subduction-related questions, most effectively through cross-disciplinary collaborations. This AGU session aims to facilitate sharing of new data and results across disciplines to help elucidate AASZ processes including but not limited to characteristics of the slab; seismogenesis and fault slip behavior; upper plate deformation processes; magma generation, fluid/volatile transport, and eruption processes; and linkages between processes. We invite contributions investigating the AASZ involving geology, geophysics, geochemistry, volcanology, rock physics, geochronology, tectonics, and geodynamics, with a particular interest in studies integrating results from multiple disciplines and/or across scales.

————-

V015. CONVERSE: Community Network for Volcanic Eruption Response – Coordination to Detect Eruption Precursors, and Respond to Volcanic Unrest and Eruptions

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/80793

Conveners: Tobias P Fischer (University of New Mexico Main Campus), Michelle L Coombs (U.S. Geological Survey), Einat Lev (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory), Paul J Wallace (University of Oregon)

Abstract:

Volcanic eruptions are common phenomena and more than 50 volcanic eruptions have occurred in the US alone in the past 31 years. These eruptions can have devastating economic and social consequences. Many volcanic eruptions have precursory signals that last from days to months while the actual eruptive events can last several years or decades. Precursory signals, such as heightened seismicity, subtle changes in gas emissions, and ground deformation, can be detected when adequate ground- and satellite- based observations are available. Observations and samples obtained during run-up and eruption have great potential for providing key scientific insights into the physical and chemical processes that drive eruptions, and obtaining them requires careful planning and coordination within the volcanological community. We encourage submissions that describe successful scientific responses to past eruptions, detection of eruption precursors, and ideas for what future responses could and should look like.

————-

OS022. Marine Geohazards

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/80421

Conveners: Derek Sawyer, Brandon Dugan, Jenna Hill, and Danny Brothers

Abstract:

Marine geohazards are sudden and extreme geologic events that affect coastal areas and seabed infrastructure on local, regional, and transoceanic scales. The hazards include submarine earthquakes, explosive volcanic eruptions and collapses of volcanic edifices, submarine slope failures, and tsunami generation. The sediment record of past offshore and coastal hazardous events is often better preserved in the marine/ lacustrine environment than on land and can be investigated in great detail with high-resolution geological and geophysical tools. We seek contributions that highlight new results and methodologies in marine paleoseismology, submarine landslide studies, tsunami generation and volcanic eruptions. We also emphasize studies that span the major process domains (e.g., the shoreline and the shelf-edge) of both active and passive continental margins, studies that provide constraints on recurrence intervals for hazardous events, and studies that link fundamental geological processes to the assessment of marine geohazards.

Job Posting: Faculty Position


Assistant (Tenure-Track) or Associate (Tenured) Professor in Solid Earth Geophysics – Jackson School of Geosciences at The University of Texas at Austin

The Department of Geological Sciences in the Jackson School of Geosciences at The University of Texas at Austin seeks to hire a faculty member in the field of solid Earth geophysics at the Assistant (tenure-track) or Associate Professor (tenured) level. We are looking for an outstanding scientist who will establish an innovative, externally-funded research program and will be committed to both teaching and mentoring at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The successful applicant is expected to develop a vibrant research program that contributes to the understanding of the dynamics and evolution of the solid Earth and complements existing strengths within the Jackson School. Areas of specialization might include, but are not limited to, seismology, geodesy, and geodynamics.  Review of applications will begin September 1, 2019 and will continue until the position is filled.

The Department of Geological Sciences is part of the Jackson School of Geosciences (JSG), which also includes two research units, the Institute for Geophysics and the Bureau of Economic Geology. With over 190 research scientists and faculty, the Jackson School of Geosciences is one of the largest academic earth science schools in the country. The University of Texas is also home to the Oden Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences and the Texas Advanced Computing Center. The University is located in a thriving metropolitan area with a dynamic, multicultural community of over 1 million people. The department is interested in building a culturally diverse intellectual community and we strongly encourage applications from all underrepresented groups. The University of Texas at Austin is an Equal Opportunity Employer with a commitment to diversity at all levels.

Interested applicants should submit a cover letter, CV, research statement, teaching statement, statement addressing past and/or potential contributions to diversity through research, teaching, and or service, and a list of at least three individuals who would be able to provide letters of reference. Submit copies of these materials online at https://apply.interfolio.com/63707 . Questions concerning the application process or receipt of application materials should be sent to Patrick Stafford (stafford.patrick@jsg.utexas.edu).

NSF GeoPRISMS Program Solicitation


The latest (and last) NSF-GeoPRISMS solicitation has been released:

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2019/nsf19581/nsf19581.htm

The program has delineated three types of activities, which may be submitted individually, or combined as part of one multi-faceted project. The types are: 1) Integrative research projects, 2) Conferences and short courses, 3) Legacy products.

Please note that Postdoctoral Scholar proposals are still welcome, and that Postdoctoral Scholar proposals no longer require two letters of reference.

Please contact Jennifer Wade in EAR [jwade@nsf.gov] or Debbie Smith in OCE [dksmith@nsf.gov] if you have any questions about GeoPRISMS.

New NSF CoPe opportunities


The GeoPRISMS Program Directors would like to remind the community about a new Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) relating to Coastlines & People, or CoPe. This is an opportunity for a range of scientists, including those who study tectonic hazards that impact cities on coastlines. Please consider taking advantage of this!

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2019/nsf19059/nsf19059.jsp

Through CoPe, NSF is interested in supporting projects to build capacity and explore research focused on understanding the impacts of coastal environmental variability and natural hazards on populated coastal regions. This DCL announces opportunities for RCNs, EAGERs, Conferences, and INTERN supplements. CoPe projects should explore the complex interface between coastal natural processes, geohazards, people and their natural and built environments. CoPe will include coastal variability and hazards on a range of spatial and temporal scales, from local to global and seconds to millenia to put current changes in context of pre-anthropogenic changes.

Questions can be directed to NSFcope@nsf.gov.

MCS Fluids Workshop remote participation


Dear Colleagues,

The Modeling Collaboratory for Subduction RCN would like to invite you to participate remotely in our Fluid Transport Modeling Workshop from May 30 – June 1, via zoom webinar. Please register for remote participation by clicking here.

The workshop will focus on assessing the critical aspects of fluid transport that should be included in the future integrative community modeling framework for subduction zones.

Remote participants will have access to our full slate of keynote presentations and discussions, and will be able to join our interactive breakout sessions. A full schedule of events is available on our website: https://www.sz4dmcs.org/fluids-workshop. A list of speakers and topics are below:

  1. Models for fluid migration in the subducting material and along/across the subduction interfaceTaras Gerya, Rachel Lauer, Johannes Vrijmoed
  2. Crust/lithosphere-scale models for magma transportRichard Katz, Janine Kavanagh, Tobias Keller
  3. Models for microscopic and short-time-scale mechanismsPengcheng Fu, Robert Skarbek, Viktoriya Yarushina
  4. Integrating/bridging processes and models across scalesEric Sonnenthal, Diane Arcay, Cian Wilson

Please feel free to forward this invitation widely, and do let me know if you have any questions or concerns (gabriel@ig.utexas.edu).

Thanks for your interest,

Gabriel Lotto, PhD
Program Manager
Modeling Collaboratory for Subduction RCN
Institute for Geophysics
The University of Texas at Austin

Job Posting: USGS-CVO Research Geology Position & CSDMS Research Software Engineer


1) CSDMS Research Software Engineer – University of Colorado at Boulder
2) USGS-CVO Research Geology position – USGS CVO, Vancouver WA 

———————————–

1) CSDMS Research Software Engineer – University of Colorado at Boulder

We are looking for a new junior colleague!

Please consider joining the friendly Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS) team at the University fo Colorado at Boulder.

There will be flexibility for postdocs to do a combination of (your own?) scientific projects and software development, CSDMS community support, and educational support or training tasks.

https://jobs.colorado.edu/jobs/JobDetail/CSMDS-Research-Software-Engineer/17780?

Dr. Irina Overeem
Associate Professor Department of Geological Sciences
CSDMS Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System
INSTAAR, University of Colorado at Boulder
PO Box 450, 80309-0450
Boulder, CO, USA

———————————–

2) USGS-CVO Research Geology position – USGS CVO, Vancouver WA 

U.S. Geological Survey’s Cascades Volcano Observatory seeks to hire a research geologist as a permanent appointment at the GS-13 grade level ($94,425-122,750 per year).  Minimum experience required is the equivalent of a PhD in geology or a related field as well as one year of postdoctoral research.  The incumbent will serve as the principal investigator of volcanic eruption processes and history, especially in (but not limited to) the Cascade Range, with the purpose of interpreting and, as appropriate, forecasting volcanic eruptions. The successful candidate will need to have experience studying volcanic phenomena and their derivative processes by means of field investigations in volcanic terrain, analogue experiments and modeling, and in addition show an ability to integrate that work with insights gained from work in related interdisciplinary fields (e.g., physical chemistry, Quaternary geology, geochronology, atmospheric physics, fluid mechanics, grain-flow mechanics, seismology, geodesy, and/or remote sensing).  It will also be necessary to demonstrate an ability to publish research in high impact scientific journals and show evidence of stature amongst professional colleagues.  Applicants must be U.S. citizens.  The U.S. Geological Survey is an equal-opportunity employer.  Applicants must apply for the position via USA Jobs https://www.usajobs.gov/.  More detailed information may be found at the USA Jobs vacancy number SAC-2019-0202.  Further inquiries about the scientific nature of the position may be directed to James Vallance of the U.S. Geological Survey (jvallance@usgs.gov).  Inquiries about how to apply should be directed to pacsac1@usgs.gov.

Use this link for more details about the position:  https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/532396200

Lesser Antilles Volatile Recycling workshop – September 2019 – registration now open


Workshop on volatile recycling, tectonics and associated hazards in the Lesser Antilles

23-27 September 2019 in St Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago

The workshop will include sessions on:

  • Incoming Atlantic plate: structure and volatile storage
  • Structure and dynamics of the subduction mantle wedge
  • Arc structure, magmatic evolution and mineralisation
  • Tectonic evolution of the Lesser Antilles
  • Seismic and volcanic hazards
  • Comparisons with other arc systems

As well as a 1-day field trip

Please save the date. Details about registration, accommodation and programme to follow soon.

*NEW*

Registration of interest now open at:

https://www.dur.ac.uk/conference.booking/details/?id=1231

*NEW*

Workshop organisers:

George Cooper (Univ. Bristol, UK)
Joan Latchman (Seismic Research Centre, Univ. West Indies, Trinidad)
Saskia Goes (Imperial College London, UK)
And the rest of the VoiLA consortium www.voila.ac.uk

New NSF CoPe opportunities


A new Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) relating to Coastlines & People, or CoPe, has been released by NSF’s Directorates for Geosciences (GEO), Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE), Biological Sciences (BIO), Engineering (ENG), Education and Human Resources (EHR) and the Office of Integrative Activities (OIA):

Through CoPe, NSF is interested in supporting projects to build capacity and explore research focused on understanding the impacts of coastal environmental variability and natural hazards on populated coastal regions. This DCL announces opportunities for RCNs, EAGERs, Conferences, and INTERN supplements. CoPe projects should explore the complex interface between coastal natural processes, geohazards, people and their natural and built environments. CoPe will include coastal variability and hazards on a range of spatial and temporal scales, from local to global and seconds to millenia to put current changes in context of pre-anthropogenic changes.

Questions can be directed to NSFcope@nsf.gov.