Sessions of interest at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting


Please see below for sessions of interest to the GeoPRISMS Community, taking place at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting, December 9-13 in San Francisco, CA. AGU abstract submission deadline is Wednesday July 31.

https://www2.agu.org/Fall-Meeting

Submit your abstract: https://www2.agu.org/en/Fall-Meeting/Pages/Submit-an-abstract

Your session is not listed? Email us at info@geoprisms.org to include your session to the list.

V026. Interactions between Magmatism, Tectonics, and Faulting in Rifts, Arcs, Ridges, Calderas, and Volcanic Fields

T034. Multidisciplinary Investigations of the Aleutian-Alaska Subduction Zone

V015. CONVERSE: Community Network for Volcanic Eruption Response – Coordination to Detect Eruption Precursors, and Respond to Volcanic Unrest and Eruptions

OS022. Marine Geohazards

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V026. Interactions between Magmatism, Tectonics, and Faulting in Rifts, Arcs, Ridges, Calderas, and Volcanic Fields

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/72237

Dear colleagues,

We wish to invite you contributing your AGU Fall Meeting abstract to the following session focusing on magma-tectonic interactions:

Conveners: Christelle Wauthier (Pennsylvania State University), James Muirhead (Syracuse University), Joël Ruch (University of Geneva), and Sarah Jaye Oliva (Tulane University)

Abstract:

Interactions between magmatism, tectonics, and faulting occur at different temporal and spatial scales, as they are observed from individual volcanoes to plate boundaries, during single eruptive events or over centuries. However, our current understanding is still limited due to a lack of integrated approaches. Field, geodetic, and modeling studies suggest that earthquakes can trigger volcanic eruptions and intrusions through static and dynamic stress transfer. Conversely, magmatic activity can generate earthquakes via stress changes in surrounding country rock. In rifting events, magmatic fluids can release tectonic stresses and also be influenced by pre-existing fracture zones. Finally, the combined effects of magmatic, gravitational, and tectonic stresses can trigger caldera and volcano flank collapse. We strongly encourage multidisciplinary studies integrating geodesy, structural geology, volcanology, geochemistry, seismology, stress analysis, and/or modeling (numerical and analogical) to decipher relationships between magmatic, tectonic, and faulting processes at different temporal and spatial scales.

We are looking forward to seeing you in San Francisco!

Sincerely,

Christelle Wauthier, James Muirhead, Joël Ruch, and Sarah Jaye Oliva

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T034. Multidisciplinary Investigations of the Aleutian-Alaska Subduction Zone

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/72464

Conveners: Xiaotao Yang (University of Massachusetts Amherst), Tamara N. Jeppson (Texas A&M University College Station), Julie Elliott (Purdue University), Daniel J. Rasmussen (Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory)

Abstract:

The Aleutian-Alaska subduction zone (AASZ) is marked by lateral variations in the subducting and overriding plates, subduction obliquity, magma composition, and eruption frequency. It is home to 54 historically active volcanoes, a volcanic gap associated with flat slab subduction, and abundant subduction-related seismicity.The AASZ is an ideal place to address a variety of subduction-related questions, most effectively through cross-disciplinary collaborations. This AGU session aims to facilitate sharing of new data and results across disciplines to help elucidate AASZ processes including but not limited to characteristics of the slab; seismogenesis and fault slip behavior; upper plate deformation processes; magma generation, fluid/volatile transport, and eruption processes; and linkages between processes. We invite contributions investigating the AASZ involving geology, geophysics, geochemistry, volcanology, rock physics, geochronology, tectonics, and geodynamics, with a particular interest in studies integrating results from multiple disciplines and/or across scales.

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V015. CONVERSE: Community Network for Volcanic Eruption Response – Coordination to Detect Eruption Precursors, and Respond to Volcanic Unrest and Eruptions

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/80793

Conveners: Tobias P Fischer (University of New Mexico Main Campus), Michelle L Coombs (U.S. Geological Survey), Einat Lev (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory), Paul J Wallace (University of Oregon)

Abstract:

Volcanic eruptions are common phenomena and more than 50 volcanic eruptions have occurred in the US alone in the past 31 years. These eruptions can have devastating economic and social consequences. Many volcanic eruptions have precursory signals that last from days to months while the actual eruptive events can last several years or decades. Precursory signals, such as heightened seismicity, subtle changes in gas emissions, and ground deformation, can be detected when adequate ground- and satellite- based observations are available. Observations and samples obtained during run-up and eruption have great potential for providing key scientific insights into the physical and chemical processes that drive eruptions, and obtaining them requires careful planning and coordination within the volcanological community. We encourage submissions that describe successful scientific responses to past eruptions, detection of eruption precursors, and ideas for what future responses could and should look like.

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OS022. Marine Geohazards

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/80421

Conveners: Derek Sawyer, Brandon Dugan, Jenna Hill, and Danny Brothers

Abstract:

Marine geohazards are sudden and extreme geologic events that affect coastal areas and seabed infrastructure on local, regional, and transoceanic scales. The hazards include submarine earthquakes, explosive volcanic eruptions and collapses of volcanic edifices, submarine slope failures, and tsunami generation. The sediment record of past offshore and coastal hazardous events is often better preserved in the marine/ lacustrine environment than on land and can be investigated in great detail with high-resolution geological and geophysical tools. We seek contributions that highlight new results and methodologies in marine paleoseismology, submarine landslide studies, tsunami generation and volcanic eruptions. We also emphasize studies that span the major process domains (e.g., the shoreline and the shelf-edge) of both active and passive continental margins, studies that provide constraints on recurrence intervals for hazardous events, and studies that link fundamental geological processes to the assessment of marine geohazards.