More sessions of interest at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting

Please see below for more sessions of interest to the GeoPRISMS Community, taking place at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting, December 9-13 in San Francisco, CA. AGU abstract submission deadline is Wednesday July 31.

https://www2.agu.org/Fall-Meeting

Submit your abstract: https://www2.agu.org/en/Fall-Meeting/Pages/Submit-an-abstract

Your session is not listed? Email us at info@geoprisms.org and we’ll be happy to include your session to the list.

V027. Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc system:  synthesis and remaining questions

T028. Interplay between structure, fluids, and deformation processes at subduction zones

T034. Multidisciplinary investigations of the Aleutian-Alaska Subduction Zone

OS025. Submarine canyons, channels, and processes that shape the seafloor

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V027. Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc system:  synthesis and remaining questions

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/81027

Conveners: Susan DeBari (Western Washington University), Shuichi Kodaira (Yokohama National University), Julie Prytulak (Imperial College London), Geoff Wheat (NURP/University of Alaska)

Abstract:

The Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) system is arguably the best-studied example of an intra-oceanic arc. The region has been a primary focus of subduction factory studies for several decades. From 2014-2017, four International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) cruises further explored this arc system, with drilling sites in the Izu forearc (subduction initiation), Izu reararc (arc evolution), west of the Kyushu-Palau remnant arc ridge (arc origins), and the Mariana forearc (serpentinite mud volcanoes). Proposals for future IODP drilling in the region are still being submitted. This session aims to highlight recent developments in IBM subduction zone studies resulting from these concentrated multi-disciplinary studies. We invite papers on subduction initiation, the formation and evolution of arc magmas and arc crust, volcanology and arc cyclicity, geochemical cycling, deep biosphere activity, geophysical structure, slab dynamics, mantle flow, and modeling studies. We also welcome papers on outstanding scientific questions that can be addressed in the IBM system.

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T028. Interplay between structure, fluids, and deformation processes at subduction zones

https://agu. confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/75877

Conveners: Shuoshuo Han (University of Texas Institute for Geophysics), Tianhaozhe Sun (The Pennsylvania State University), Laura Wallace (GNS Science), Christie Rowe (McGill University)

Abstract:

Deformation processes at subduction zones span a vast range of spatial and temporal scales and contribute to the long-term margin evolution and mass transport through the earthquake cycle and beyond. Individual earthquakes and slow slip events involve complex patterns of deformation and fluid effects. Various modes of elastic, viscous, and plastic deformation shape the structure across the plate boundary fault zone, and within both the upper and lower plates during individual events and over longer timescales. Numerous recent onshore and offshore investigations have connected fault slip, fault zone and wall rock properties, and highlight the interplay between structure, fluids, and deformation processes in the subduction system. In this session, we invite contributions studying the key controls of subduction zone deformation, structural evolution, the role of fluids, and the associated geohazards. Multi-disciplinary contributions from geological, geophysical, and laboratory experimental studies, as well as modeling studies that integrate observations, are all welcome.

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T034. Multidisciplinary investigations of the Aleutian-Alaska Subduction Zone

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/72464

Conveners: Xiaotao Yang (Harvard University), Tamara N. Jeppson (Texas A&M University), Julie Elliott (Purdue University), Daniel J. Rasmussen (Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University)

We would like to draw your attention to our AGU session: “T034. Multidisciplinary investigations of the Aleutian-Alaska Subduction Zone”. Recent initiatives including EarthScope and GeoPRISMS have generated a wealth of new data in the region, providing a unique opportunity for integrated studies of this dynamic subduction system. We aim to highlight and facilitate such studies by bringing together contributions from geology, geophysics, geochemistry, volcanology, rock physics, geochronology, tectonics, and geodynamics.

Please consider contributing to our session.

Invited Speakers:

Geoffrey Abers (Cornell University), Jessica Larsen (University of Alaska, Fairbanks)

Abstract:

The Aleutian-Alaska subduction zone (AASZ) is marked by lateral variations in the subducting and overriding plates, subduction obliquity, magma composition, and eruption frequency. It is home to 54 historically active volcanoes, a volcanic gap associated with flat slab subduction, and abundant subduction-related seismicity.The AASZ is an ideal place to address a variety of subduction-related questions, most effectively through cross-disciplinary collaborations. This AGU session aims to facilitate sharing of new data and results across disciplines to help elucidate AASZ processes including but not limited to characteristics of the slab; seismogenesis and fault slip behavior; upper plate deformation processes; magma generation, fluid/volatile transport, and eruption processes; and linkages between processes. We invite contributions investigating the AASZ involving geology, geophysics, geochemistry, volcanology, rock physics, geochronology, tectonics, and geodynamics, with a particular interest in studies integrating results from multiple disciplines and/or across scales.

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OS025. Submarine canyons, channels, and processes that shape the seafloor

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/80642

Conveners: Katherine L Maier (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research), Jamie Howarth (Victoria University of Wellington), Jingping P. Xu (Southern University of Science and Technology), Michael Andrew Clare (University of Southampton)

Abstract:

Submarine canyons and channels feed vast amounts of sediment and organic carbon into the deep sea via flows that shape the seafloor. These sediment transport processes, and resulting geomorphology and stratigraphy, can record tectonic, paleoclimatic, paleoseismic, and paleoceanographic changes, pose hazards for seafloor infrastructure, provide benthic habitats, and introduce nutrients and contaminants to ecosystems. Recent studies and technological advances have propelled our ability to link flows with deposits and morphological change, particularly through instrumental and seafloor observations and high-resolution imaging. We encourage multidisciplinary contributions from the full range of submarine canyon, channel, and turbidity current studies, from how sediment enters canyons to distal submarine fans. Contributions may include measurements of turbidity currents and internal tides, quantification of surficial features and morphologic change through seafloor mapping and observation, stratigraphic architecture from subsurface and outcrop datasets, geochemical analysis of deep-sea sediments and organic carbon, as well as physical and numerical modelling.