More sessions of interest at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting


Please see below for more sessions of interest to the GeoPRISMS Community, taking place at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting, December 9-13 in San Francisco, CA. AGU abstract submission deadline is Wednesday July 31.

https://www2.agu.org/Fall-Meeting

Submit your abstract: https://www2.agu.org/en/Fall-Meeting/Pages/Submit-an-abstract

All sessions are available on the GeoPRISMS website at: http://geoprisms.org/meetings/agu-sessions/. Your session is not listed? Email us at info@geoprisms.org to include your session to the list.

G012. Plate Motion, Continental Deformation, and Interseismic Strain Accumulation

V008. Boom, Zap, and Roar: Multi-disciplinary characterization of volcanic explosion, jet, and plume dynamics

T050. Subduction Top to Bottom 2 (ST2B-2): Processes and Products Modern and Ancient?

MR005. Carbon and Hydrogen in the Deep Earth

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G012. Plate Motion, Continental Deformation, and Interseismic Strain Accumulation

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/74353

Conveners: Donald F Argus (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Jeffrey Todd Freymueller (Alaska Volcano Observatory Fairbanks), Rui Manuel Silva Fernandes (University of Beira Interior), D. Sarah Stamps (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Abstract: We seek studies examining the take up of plate motion in deforming zones and the buildup and release of elastic strain along major faults and in subduction zones using space geodetic measurements, geologic observations, and geophysical data such as seismicity, marine magnetic anomalies, and transform fault azimuths. How can GPS and InSAR be integrated to determine deformation in plate boundary zones?  To what extent can observed elastic strain buildup and past earthquakes be used to infer the likelihood of future earthquakes?  Are fault slip rates from paleoseismology identical to those from geodetic data?  What fraction of plate motion is taken up by fault slip during earthquakes, and what fraction becomes part of distributed deformation off the major faults?  How fast are mountains currently rising?  To what degree do postseismic transients alter the nearly constant velocity of the plates, and how can postseismic transients influence the definition of Earth’s reference frame?

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V008. Boom, Zap, and Roar: Multi-disciplinary characterization of volcanic explosion, jet, and plume dynamics

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/81555

Conveners: Kathleen F McKee (Carnegie Institution for Science Washington), Sonja A Behnke

(University of South Florida Tampa), Mary Benage (USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory), Benjamin James Andrews (Smithsonian Institution)

Abstract: Explosive volcanic eruptions generate highly electrified, multi-phase momentum-driven fluid flows (jets) that can transform into buoyant plumes. Understanding the dynamics of these systems is critical for forecasting eruption behavior and interpreting geophysical and visual observations of the jets and plumes. Unfortunately, these eruptions present numerous hazards and the interiors of the jets and plumes are obscured from direct observation. In this session we welcome submissions that discuss the dynamics of explosive eruption processes from generation to cessation with particular foci on processes that occur in the jet and plume, such as how lightning manifests in a jet or plume, particle concentration gradients and aggregation, turbulent structures, etc. We are particularly interested in studies that use field observations (e.g., seismicity, infrasound, gas, visible, infrared, and UV imagery, lightning, radar, deformation), laboratory and analog experiments, and/or physics-based modeling.

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T050. Subduction Top to Bottom 2 (ST2B-2): Processes and Products Modern and Ancient?

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/76155

Conveners: Gray E Bebout (Lehigh University), David William Scholl (University of Alaska Fairbanks), Robert J Stern (Univ Texas Dallas), Laura Wallace (University of Texas)

Abstract: From top-to-bottom, many geological, geophysical, petrologic/geochemical, and theoretical advancements have been made toward understanding subduction zone processes and dynamics. The term “subduction” was introduced in its modern sense in 1970 and the 1996 AGU Geophysical Monograph “Subduction Top to Bottom” marked a milestone in our understanding by capturing 26 years of early advances. This “Subduction Top to Bottom 2” (ST2B-2) session and a related themed issue in the GSA journal GEOSPHERE (now at more than 60 papers and growing) revisit these issues and re-assess them in light of recent advancements as well as explore new discoveries and advances in subduction zone research. We invite the broadest possible range of contributions, including abstracts considering subduction-related hazards, climate effects, and resources. We encourage presentations regarding processes at modern subduction zones and evidence of ancient subduction yielding insight regarding Earth plate tectonic evolution and processes at depth in modern margins.

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MR005. Carbon and Hydrogen in the Deep Earth

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/85234

Conveners: Cara Vennari (University of California Santa Cruz), Elizabeth Colette Thompson (University of Chicago), Natalia V Solomatova (Ecole Normale Supérieure Lyon), Lars N Hansen (University of Oxford)

Abstract: Carbon and hydrogen both play significant roles in the physical, petrological, geochemical, and geodynamic processes that shape our planet. Yet despite their importance, the degree and mechanisms of the cycling of these volatiles between Earth’s surface and interior remains an area of open inquiry, as is the long-term accommodation (i.e., storage) of carbon and hydrogen in the deep Earth. This session aims to unite researchers from the fields of seismology, geodynamics, petrology, geochemistry, and mineral physics, who actively investigate the role of carbon and hydrogen in Earth’s interior. Relevant topics include, but are not limited to: investigations into the origin, cycling, and fractionation of carbon and hydrogen; seismic and geodynamic studies of their influence in the deep Earth; and experimental and theoretical constraints on the structure, stability, and physical properties of carbon- and hydrogen-bearing phases at extreme conditions.