GeoPRISMS Photo Contest


Congratulations to Isabella Gama, winner of the 2019 GeoPRISMS Photo Contest!

Congratulations to Isabella Gama (Brown University) for winning the fifth edition of the GeoPRISMS Photo Contest at the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting. Isabella’s research is mainly on GeoPRISMS topics on (i) origin and evolution of the continental crust and (ii) plate boundary deformation and geodynamics in Alaska. The photo Isabella submitted encompasses the tectonic-sediment-climate interactions of the region. Isabella took this photo in the Summer 2019 in Palmer, Alaska, in the Matanuska Glacier where she taught a class, she designed, on scientific method in the context of geology research. The class explained the geology and glaciology components observed in the field. The trip was part of a leadership fieldwork from Brown University that focused on training 31 high schoolers from all over the world about environmental issues. This photo dramatically depicts melted glacier with silt and other impurities that create diverse flow patterns.

Isabella received a framed copy of his photo and his photo will be featured in the Final issue of the GeoPRISMS Newsletter.

Thank you to all participants for their participation! The photos from all contestants are available below.

Teaching Alaskan geology on top of a glacier to high school students. The photo dramatically depicts melted glacier water with silt and other impurities that create diverse flow patterns. This photo was taken on July 30, 2019, in Palmer, Alaska, in the Matanuska Glacier. I designed and taught a class on scientific method in the context of geology reserach and explained the geology and glaciology components we saw in the field. The trip was part of a leadership fieldwork from Brown University that focused on training 31 high schoolers from all over the world about environmental issues. Photo credit: Isabella Gama

The photo contest is now closed to entries.

Welcome to the 5th and last edition of the GeoPRISMS Photo Contest!

Share with the GeoPRISMS Community what your GeoPRISMS-related research looks like, whether you are working in the field, or in the lab.

The winner of the contest will be announced during the GeoPRISMS Reception that will take place on the Sunday before the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting at the Grand Hyatt Union Square (more information about the reception will become available soon). The winner will receive a print out of the photo and the winning photo will be published on the GeoPRISMS Website, Newsletter and @geoprisms Facebook and Twitter accounts.

The GeoPRISMS Photo Contest is open to anyone whose research is related to GeoPRISMS.

See below for more information about the contest and guidelines.

Who can enter the contest?

The GeoPRISMS Photo Contest is open to anyone whose research is related to GeoPRISMS. Just follow the guidelines described below.

What should be the subject of the photo?

The submitted photo should be focused on the entrant’s research, and must be related to the GeoPRISMS Science and Objectives.

What should be submitted?

The GeoPRISMS Photo Contest is limited to one submission per entrant.

1. One photograph (JPEG, PNG, or TIFF file) focusing on the entrant’s research related to GeoPRISMS Science and Objectives. Each photo must be original and authentic material taken by the contest entrant.

2. A complete and accurate caption. Caption shouldn’t be more than 100 words and should include the exact location featured in the entry photo, the subject displayed in the photo, and when the photo was taken.

3. A complete and signed GeoPRISMS Photo Contest release form, including the entrant’s personal information:

Name
Institution
Address (street, city, state, postal code, country)
email

All information and release form should be sent in an email along with the photograph to info@geoprisms.org with the subject “GeoPRISMS Photo Contest”.

When is the deadline?

All eligible submissions must be received electronically by Monday November 4, 2019.

How the photographs will be judged?

The photographs will be judged by the GeoPRISMS Steering and Oversight Committee members. Judging criteria include:
  • Does the picture reflect the GeoPRISMS Science and Objectives?
  • Technical quality of the image, creativity, and storytelling will be subject to judges’ estimation.

During the selection process, the judges will only have access to the title, description and caption of the photo. No personally identifiable information such as photographers’ names or email addresses will be visible to the judges.

Decisions of the judges are final.

Prize

The winner of the GeoPRISMS Photo Contest will be announced at the GeoPRISMS reception that will take place at the Grand Hyatt Union Square in San Francisco on the Sunday before the AGU Fall Meeting. The winner will be contacted before the reception by email. The winner will receive a print out of the photograph and her or his photograph will be posted on the GeoPRISMS website and will be highlighted in the final issue of the GeoPRISMS Newsletter and on the @geoprisms Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Disclaimer

By submitting an entry, the contest entrant affirms that she/he holds all rights to the photograph submitted. Entrant agrees to allow the GeoPRISMS Program to use her or his name and photograph to post on the GeoPRISMS website, and to be published in the GeoPRISMS Newsletter, without compensation. Entrants consent that the GeoPRISMS Program can display or create derivative works of all entries for any educational, promotional, publicity, archival, exhibition or other non-commercial purpose in any media.


2018


Congratulations to James Muirhead, winner of the 2018 GeoPRISMS Photo Contest!

Congratulations to James Muirhead (Syracuse University) for winning the fourth edition of the GeoPRISMS Photo Contest at the 2018 AGU Fall Meeting. James took this photo during a field campaign conducted in the Natron Basin in Tanzania in the Spring of 2018. A fissure resulting from dike-induced faulting is observed on the foreground. The Kerimasi (left) and Oldoinyo Lengai (right) volcanoes are visible in the background. James received a framed copy of his photo and his photo will be featured in the Spring 2019 issue of the GeoPRISMS Newsletter.

Thank you to all participants for their participation! The photos from all contestants are available below.

A torn landscape on Gelai volcano in the Natron basin, Tanzania. In this sector of the East African Rift System, magmatic-tectonic interactions culminate in volcanism, earthquakes, and release of large carbon dioxide volumes. This image, taken in May 2018, illustrates such interactions, where Professor Tobias Fischer investigates a fissure resulting from dike-induced faulting occurring ~11 years prior. Small volcanic cones (<100 m high) of the Naibor Soito field are observed in the mid ground. The much larger Kerimasi (left) and Oldoinyo Lengai (right) composite volcanoes are in the background, with the latter erupting explosively during this volcanic-tectonic crisis in 2007-2008. Photo credit: James Muirhead


2017


Congratulations to Gene Yogodzinski, winner of the 2017 GeoPRISMS Photo Contest!

Congratulations to Gene Yogodzinski (University of South Carolina) for winning the third edition of the GeoPRISMS Photo Contest at the 2017 AGU Fall Meeting. Gene took this photo during a field campaign conducted on Unalaska Island in the Eastern Aleutians. Pillow lavas can be observed in the lower part of the outcrops behind Gene’s colleague Merry Cai (Lamont) who provides the scale for the photo. The mottled appearance is produced by the reddish-brown pillow interiors, surrounded by green, inter-pillow sediment and altered pillow rinds. The upper part of the outcrop is an andesite sill with short, columnar joints at 90° to the horizontal contact. These rocks were formed prior to affects of crustal thickening by magmatism and accretionary tectonics, which eventually lead to the emergence of the large islands that we see in the eastern Aleutians today. Gene received a framed copy of his photo and his photo will be featured in the Spring 2018 issue of the GeoPRISMS Newsletter.

Thank you to all participants for their participation! The photos from all contestants are available below.

Pacific coast outcrops on Unalaska Island, eastern Aleutians. Merry Cai (Lamont) provides the scale. The rocks in the lower outcrop behind Merry are pillow lavas. The mottled appearance is produced by the reddish-brown pillow interiors, surrounded by green, inter-pillow sediment and altered pillow rinds. The upper part of the outcrop is an andesite sill with short, columnar joints at 90° to the horizontal contact. These rocks were formed prior to affects of crustal thickening by magmatism and accretionary tectonics, which eventually lead to the emergence of the large islands that we see in the eastern Aleutians today. Photo credit: Gene Yogodzinski

 

 

 

 


2016


Congratulations to D. Sarah Stamps, winner of the 2016 GeoPRISMS Photo Contest!

Congratulations to D. Sarah Stamps (Virginia Tech) for winning the second edition of the GeoPRISMS Photo Contest at AGU 2016. Sarah took this fantastic photo of a GPS station installed on the Natron Rift of the East African Rift in Tanzania during a field campaign conducted in June 2016. The active volcano Ol Doinyo Lengai towers can be seen in the background. Sarah received a framed copy of her photo at the GeoPRISMS Townhall Meeting hosted at the AGU Fall Meeting. Her photo will also be featured in the Spring 2017 issue of the GeoPRISMS Newsletter.

Thank you to all participants for their participation! The photos from all contestants are available below.

Continuous Global Positioning System station installed on the Natron Rift of the East African Rift in Tanzania. The active volcano Ol Doinyo Lengai towers in the background. This GPS station was installed in June 2016. Photo credit D. Sarah Stamps (Virginia Tech)


2015


Congratulations to Michelle Coombs the winner of the 2015 GeoPRISMS Photo Contest!

Congratulations to Michelle Coombs (USGS) for winning the first edition of the GeoPRISMS Photo Contest at AGU 2015. Michelle took this fantastic photo of Kanaga volcano in September 2015 during the western Aleutians field work, jointly funded by GeoPRISMS, Deep Carbon Observatory, and Alaska Volcano Observatory. Michelle received a framed copy of her photo at the GeoPRISMS Townhall Meeting hosted at the AGU Fall Meeting. Her photo was also featured in the Spring issue of the GeoPRISMS Newsletter.

Thank you to all participants for their participation. The photos from all contestants are available below.

Kanaga Volcano, Aleutian Islands, as seen from the east. The blocky andesite lava flow in the foreground erupted in 1906. Photo credit: Michelle Coombs, USGS

Kanaga Volcano, Aleutian Islands, as seen from the east. The blocky andesite lava flow in the foreground erupted in 1906. Photo credit: Michelle Coombs, USGS