Putting the “Community” in the Alaska Amphibious Community Seismic Experiment (AACSE): Alaska Peninsula and Western Gulf of Alaska, Summer 2018


The AACSE Team*

*This report was edited and compiled by Lindsay Worthington.

AACSE PI team: Geoff Abers (Lead PI, Cornell U.), Aubreya Adams (Colgate U.), Peter Haeussler (USGS), Emily Roland (U. of Washington), Susan Schwartz (U. of California Santa Cruz), Anne Sheehan (U. of Colorado), Donna Shillington (Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory), Spahr Webb (Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory), Doug Wiens (Washington U. St. Louis), Lindsay Worthington (U. of New Mexico).

2018 Apply-to-Sail Participants: Collin Brandl (Graduate Student, U. of New Mexico), Enrique Chon (Graduate Student, U. of Colorado), David Heath (Graduate Student, Colorado State U.), Robert Martin-Short (Graduate Student, U. of California Berkeley), Kelly Olsen (Graduate Student, U. of Texas), Holly Rotman (Postdoctoral Researcher, New Mexico Tech), Samantha Hansen (Associate Professor, U. of Alabama), Tiegan Hobbs (Graduate Student, Georgia Tech), Amanda Price (Graduate Student, Washington U. St. Louis), Heather Shaddox (Graduate Student, U. of California Santa Cruz), Jefferson Yarce (Graduate Student, U. of Colorado Boulder), Natalia Ruppert (Seismologist, U. of Alaska Fairbanks)

K-12 Educators On Board: Shannon Hendricks (High School Science Teacher, Anchorage School District), Bethany Essary (High School Science Teacher, Anchorage School District).

The shore-based field teams included graduate student Michael Mann (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory) and undergraduate student Jordan Tockstein (Colgate U.). We thank the captain and crew of the R/V Sikuliaq and the pilots, boat captains and land owners that made these deployments possible. Special thanks to Bill Danforth from the USGS for his bathymetric processing expertise aboard Leg 2 and Patrick Shore from Washington U. for coordinating onshore field logistics and preparing the data for delivery to the DMC.

If you visit Alaska and tell people that you are a seismologist, you are going to hear an earthquake story. The Alaska-Aleutian subduction system is arguably the most seismically active globally, producing more >M8 earthquakes over the last century than any other. As a result, earthquake and tsunami hazard are woven into daily life here. Near downtown Anchorage, you can visit Earthquake Park, occupying part of town that was decimated by a landslide during the 1964 M9.2 event that inspired the term “megathrust” earthquake. If you happen to be in Kodiak on a Wednesday afternoon, you will hear the weekly tsunami siren drill sound throughout the town. Earlier this year that drill was put in to practice as residents made their way through the tsunami evacuation process, meeting up at the school on high ground after midnight on January 29 following the M7.9 earthquake that occurred offshore.
So, how do you study an 800 km section of this subduction zone that is mostly offshore or only accessible via air or boat? Simple. Start with nine Principal Investigators (PIs) and dozens of conference calls; take 85 ocean bottom seismometers (OBS), thirty broadband seismometers, one fishing boat, two float planes, two fixed wing planes, a helicopter, and a 261-ft research ship; add a team of twelve OBS engineers, 24 ships crew, twelve Apply-to-Sail participants, two Alaskan K-12 teachers and two field technicians. Then make the data open and accessible as quickly as possible. This is the Alaska Amphibious Community Seismic Experiment (AACSE) and these are voices from the field.

The Alaska Amphibious Community Seismic Experiment (AACSE) deployment map prepared by Peter Haeussle

OBS Deployment Cruise Leg 1 | Seward, AK to Seward, AK – May 9-29, 2018

>> 9 May, 2018 | We are officially underway • It is 8:30am and we are departing Seward dock. We have donned our full-body immersion suits as part of a safety drill, and are now heading towards the first seismometer deployment site, lying in the Shelikof Strait just north of Kodiak Island. We are on one of the most modern and well-equipped scientific research ships in the world. The R/V Sikuliaq was built in 2014 and has a science lab, lounge, dining room, kitchen, gym, and the list goes on. There is even a sauna which apparently can double as a hypothermia recovery room – let’s hope we won’t be using it for that purpose. For cabins, we are treated to the height of oceanographic luxury. The rooms are practical and very comfortable. The Sikuliaq takes its name from the Inupiaq word that means “young sea ice”. Thanks to its round hull, the ship is capable of breaking ice up to 2.5 ft thick, which is essential on polar missions. This also gives it a tendency to move around more in high seas. As we travel, we will be collecting meteorological data such as pressure, temperature, and wind speed. We will also be recording bathymetry data to map the seafloor.

-Robert Martin-Short, University of California Berkeley

>> 10 May, 2018 | Deploying the first OBS instrument • The first OBS (Ocean Bottom Seismometer) is a shallow-water Trawl-Resistant Mounted Seismometer (TRMS), design to resist and deflect the lower leading line of bottom trawl nets. All of the OBSs are instrumented with a seismometer, batteries to last more than fifteen months, transponders to communicate with the ship and burn the wire to release the seismometer for recovery, data logger, temperature sensors, and other equipment necessary to collect these data. The shell for the TRMS itself weighs about 1,300 lbs, the whole instrument weighs about 1,800 lbs. The deployment is a success! After deploying the TRMS, we have to hide from foul weather in Larsen Bay, then assemble more TRMSs. This involves removing the doors and installing brackets to hold equipment, attaching hoods to the pop-up TRMS, checking the transponders to make sure they are properly communicating with the ship, and attaching the transponders. We will stay in the cove and work for a couple hours, then leave once the storm has passed.

-David Heath, Colorado State University

>> 12 May, 2018 | Waiting out the storm • Many of us are taking to personal hobbies and pastimes in between routine status logging. Some people are reading quietly. Others are attempting to catch up on emails, though the internet is particularly slow. Others are taking the opportunity to chat with shipmates, many of whom are still practically strangers after few days on the ship. I am learning that life on a ship provides a unique opportunity for people to connect with each other. I have spent part of the evening receiving a generous guitar lesson from the Chief Steward who is a skilled blues musician. He kindly reached out to play alongside me when he noticed me strumming out on deck. I’ve got to say, my experience thus far has been pretty great, despite the spotty weather and fits of acute nausea.

-Enrique Chon, University of Colorado

OBS Deployment Cruise Leg 2 | Seward, AK to Seward, AK; July 11-24, 2018

>> 11 July, 2018 | Educators Onboard • There are so many people involved in a research cruise like this. There is an entire ship crew, scientists, graduate students, USGS employees, OBS technicians, and, on this trip, there are even two high school science teachers and I am one of those. I am stoked to be on board. My colleague, Shannon Hendricks, and I were selected as part of the Educator Onboard K12 program. Through this program, educators are given the opportunity to participate in research to better understand current science practices. The goal is to use that knowledge to create engaging, authentic lesson plans to share with other educators. It is a little intimidating to meet all of these experts – as science teachers, we know a little bit about a lot of things, and we have a solid enough science foundation to understand what the experts are talking about (most of the time!). This also means we know enough to realize how much we don’t know! It is amazing to get to learn from scientists that have made this their life work. Getting to peek in on their ongoing research makes us better science teachers. And it is nice to know that, just like we tell our own students, there are no stupid questions.

-Bethany Essary, West High School science teacher, Anchorage, AK

>> 23 July, 2018 | The aftershock zone • Day 12 of the cruise, we have just successfully deployed our last OBS, 32 hours ahead of schedule! Half way through this cruise, we decided to move one of the instruments to near the aftershock zone of the M7.9 Offshore Kodiak earthquake. It struck about three hundred kilometers offshore Kodiak Island in the early morning hours of January 23, 2018, in the outer rise region of the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone. It triggered tsunami warnings and prompted evacuations of thousands of people in Alaskan coastal communities. While the source parameters (such as seismic moment tensor) for the earthquake suggested strike-slip faulting (hence no significant tsunami generated), the true complexity of the source has only become evident through analysis of multiple datasets. At least four conjugate strike-slip faults were involved in the earthquake rupture. However, the distant location of the aftershock source region to the land-based stations made the data analysis and interpretation difficult. On the Leg 1 cruise, a couple of stations were serendipitously placed near or in the aftershock zone. After consultations with the PI group we moved this station to the aftershock cluster. This enhanced network of OBS sensors in the aftershock zone will help characterize the aftershock sequence with much better accuracy.

-Natalia Ruppert, University of Alaska

>> 24 July, 2018 | Good luck • For the past three years, I have been looking at OBS data off the east coast of New Zealand’s North Island, and I always wondered about the logistics behind the dataset of earthquakes. It turns out that deploying ocean bottom seismometers is a huge task that includes multiple people. This experience exceeds all my expectations. I imagined a repetitive process, but every single station has its own challenges: the bathymetry indicates a rough or steep relief so we have to move somewhere close by with a more flat and soft bathymetry; we need to be sure that the temperature sensors are the ideal for specific depths; we fill the sheets with station information and log it in our physical and digital forms, etc. This experience makes me really value all the effort that the science crew did for the deployment and recovery of the data that I am currently working on. For the future seismologists who are going to work with the data, I want to say that we did our best to make sure the seismometers were meticulously deployed and I am sure the recovery crew will be equally careful to collect the year-long log of wiggles from the stations deployed by the first and second legs. Good luck!

-Jefferson Yarce, University of Colorado

Onshore Deployment: Alaska Peninsula, Kodiak Island and Shumagin Islands; May-June 2018

>> 16 May, 2018 | A for Amphibious • The second A in AACSE stands for Amphibious – fully encompassing the entire subduction zone requires making measurements on land and at sea. The onshore part of the program involves installing instruments on Kodiak Island, the Shumagin Islands (southwest of Kodiak), the Alaska Peninsula and the region around Katmai National Park. These thirty instruments will be placed in remote locations (black circles on the map p.19) accessed by float planes or small fixed-wing planes. One team of three people is installing thirteen sites on Kodiak Island, and a second team is deploying the rest of the sites on the mainland and Shumagin Island. Today the Kodiak team started their first day of work! Like working at sea, the initial work involves unpacking all the gear shipped from across the country, and testing and assembling everything. To make sure everything is working properly, we do a “huddle test,” where we set up all of the seismometers and data loggers in one place and let them collect data for one day. We are fortunate to have been given access to some space in the Kodiak Alaska Fisheries Science Center, a research facility that provides valuable data to the fishing industry and that has a wonderful aquarium. This means we are sometimes sharing the space with sea life, like a large half-decomposed salmon shark! Tomorrow, if all goes well, we can start deploying!

– Geoff Abers, Cornell University

>> 21 May, 2018 | Kodiak Island • The road network on Kodiak Island is confined to the region around the town of Kodiak, so one must travel by boat or plane to reach other parts of this rugged and beautiful island. Eight of the thirteen seismic stations that we are installing here are both off the road system and far from towns with air strips, and we have been traveling to them by float plane. One limitation of using small planes for seismic installations is that there is a weight limit on what you can bring. The float plane we have been using, a de Havilland DHC-2 Beaver, can carry 1,200 lbs. Our field team and equipment for two stations weigh 1,175 lbs! We have to do a weigh-in before our first flight – fortunately they weighed our field team together and not individually. Flying also requires better weather than simply driving to a station. So far, we have found that the weather is worse on the eastern part of Kodiak near Kodiak town but improves to the west. We feel lucky to have had three days in a row where we could fly out to some of our sites. In the last three days, we have installed five stations that have taken us to many corners of Kodiak: McDonald lagoon on the southwestern coast, small Anvil Lake in far western Kodiak and the gorgeous Uyak Bay, a fjord that connects to the ocean in the north and cuts across two thirds of the island. This fjord is enabling us to deploy closely spaced stations over a part of the subduction zone fault where large earthquakes occur, one of the primary targets of this project. Traveling by plane across Kodiak is spectacular; you are treated to stunning views of snow-capped mountains and broad valleys. Sometimes you can see mountain goats lining steep slopes, bears meandering along the shore, and frolicking otters in the water. The views from our seismic sites are really amazing, too, when we look up from orienting sensors and plugging in data loggers. Six down, seven to go for the Kodiak team!

-Donna Shillington, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

>> 30 May, 2018 | Challenging Conditions • The three members of the Sand Point team set sail on the Aleut Mistress to install two strong motion sites on Nagai Island. The day started with beautiful glassy-smooth seas and a calm two hour cruise to our first site on the north side of the island. We loaded our equipment into a skiff, hopped onboard and motored to our chosen landing site. This site was chosen by satellite imagery, and as always, conditions on the ground were a little different than expected. Our landing site was a bit marshy, and we had to lug the equipment uphill through marsh grasses and bushes, and then dig through a foot-thick mat of interwoven vegetation to find a suitably dry site for burial. Anything for good data! The equipment worked like a champ, so our time spent testing it in Sand Point paid off. We left the station after five hours of work – only two-and-a-half times longer than it has taken for any other station thus far! Back on the Aleut Mistress, our captain, Boomer, had boiled some Alaskan crab for our lunch. Hard to get it any fresher!

In the afternoon, the seas started picking up with swells a little over two fathoms (that’s a little over twelve feet for you land-lubbers). While none of our crew suffered from seasickness, there were some flying objects on deck and in the cabin! We hopped back in the skiff when we reached Nagai site #2, and headed toward shore. We got so close, but in the end the boat crew felt it was unsafe to land with the high seas and changing tide. Disappointed, we made the call to cancel the site. It is a hard decision to choose not to install a station. Fortunately, an excellent Plan B fell into our laps. As luck would have it, Boomer owns property near King Cove and offered his place as a home for our new station. So, a fairly tough first day in the field ended on a high note, with the formation of plans for the future. The next three days passed slowly, as our team waited on unanticipated repairs to the plane needed for other installations out of Sand Point. Everybody wants a well-maintained plane, so we waited patiently for the repairs and sorted through and retested equipment in Sand Point. By the time the plane was ready, our team was raring to hit the field again. We hammered out four more stations in just two days, and have nearly finished our work here in Sand Point.

-Aubreya Adams, Colgate University

Get involved

This project is intended to help grow the seismological community, and includes opportunities to sail on OBS cruises and short courses for undergraduates. Upcoming opportunities for 2019 will be announced in December on the project website.

Contact members of the PI team for more information. All seismic data from the project will be open to the community upon recovery and QA/QC efforts at the IRIS DMC (OBS array has network code XD (2018-2019) and land array has network code XO (2018-2019)). The first three months of onshore data is currently online. All underway data acquired by the Sikuliaq will be archived and available at the UNOLS rolling deck to repository server.

Check out the experiment blog for more stories from the field

Reference information

A continent-scale geodetic velocity field for East Africa. R. Bendick, M. Floyd, E. Lewi, G Kianji, R. King, E. Knappe
GeoPRISMS Newsletter, Issue No. 41, Fall 2018. Retrieved from http://geoprisms.org

Distinguished Lectureship Program Speakers


2018 – 2019

Jaime Barnes

Dr. Jaime Barnes is an Associate Professor at the University of Texas at Austin. She uses stable isotopes as geochemical tracers of fluids in various tectonic and geologic settings from the upper mantle, the oceanic lithosphere, the subducting plate interface, and thermal springs. Much of her research involves volatile cycling, metamorphism and volatile transport in subduction zones, serpentinization, and fluid-rock interactions and metasomatism in high temperature environments with the overarching goal to improve our knowledge of the chemical evolution of the Earth.

 

Public Lecture: A geochemical glimpse into hydrothermal systems

Technical Lecture: The role of the forearc in volatile cycling through subduction zones

2018-2019 Host Institutions
  • Winona State University | April 15, 2019
  • University of Southern California | October 1-3, 2018
  • University of Maine | April 23, 2019
  • Wesleyan University | April 25, 2019
  • Utah State University | April 8-9, 2019
  • University of Utah | April 10-11, 2019

  Watch the Technical Lecture given by Jaime Barnes at the University of Utah in April 2019.

  Watch the Public Lecture given by Jaime Barnes at the University of Utah in April 2019.


Anne Bécel

Dr. Anne Bécel is an Associate Research Professor at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Her research focuses on characterizing the seismic structure of the Earth’s crust and mantle to better understand underlying tectonic and magmatic processes primarily along active plate boundaries but also at rifted passive margins and ocean basin settings.  To investigate these processes, she uses marine active-source seismology and combines her results with other geophysical data such as seismicity, drill hole and potential field data. Since she arrived at Lamont, her research has mainly focused on the study of the Alaska Peninsula and Hellenic subduction zones with an emphasis on assessing specific risks such as large earthquakes and associated tsunamis and the development of the Eastern North American passive margin.

Public Lecture: Imaging the source of large subduction zone earthquakes
Technical Lecture [ENAM Focus]: A new view on the deep structure of the Eastern North American Margin: implications for continental breakup and early seafloor spreading history

Technical Lecture [Alaska Focus]:Connections between along-strike variations in seismic structure and earthquake behavior at the Alaska Peninsula subduction zone

2018-2019 Host Institutions
  • California University of Pennsylvania | December 19, 2018
  • James Madison University | October 18, 2018
  • Southern Methodist University | November 30, 2018
  • Scripps Institution of Oceanography | February 5, 2019
  • New Mexico Tech | March 7, 2019
  • University of New Mexico | March 8, 2019
 Watch the Technical Lecture given by Anne Bécel at James Madison University in October 2018.

Cynthia Ebinger

Dr. Cynthia Ebinger holds the Marshall-Heape Chair in Geology at Tulane University. She received her BS in marine geology from Duke University, and a MS and PhD from the MIT–Woods Hole Oceanographic Joint Program in Oceanography. She completed her postdoctoral training at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and through a NATO fellowship at the University of Leeds. Her research focuses on plate boundary deformation processes, with focus on volcano and earthquake processes in marine and continental settings. Specifically, her data acquisition and modeling probe the response of Earth’s plates to stresses induced by the movement of faults and the flow of magma and volatiles. As a geophysicist, she utilizes a range of signal processing and analytical and numerical modeling, studies of rock properties and Earth deformation processes, linking geological and geophysical data sets. The goal of her research teams is to understand the basic physics of fundamental Earth processes.

Public Lecture: Recipe for continental rifting: Flavors of East Africa

Technical Lecture: Earthquakes within continental plates: How, where, and why it matters 

2018-2019 Host Institutions
  • University at Buffalo |
  • University of Florida | April 4, 2019
  • Western Carolina University | March 7, 2019
  • University of Tennessee | March 9, 2019
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst | October 25, 2018
  • University of Connecticut | October 24, 2018
2017-2018 Host Institutions
  • Florida International University | October 13, 2017
  • Michigan Technological University | November 13, 2017
  • Marshall University | February 21, 2018
  • Weber State University | March 15-16, 2018
  • New Mexico Tech | February 15-16, 2018
 Watch the Technical Lecture given by Cindy Ebinger at Marshall University in February 2018.

 Watch the Technical Lecture given by Cindy Ebinger at New Mexico Tech in February 2018.

Abhijit Ghosh

Dr. Abhijit Ghosh is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth Sciences, University of California, Riverside. He earned his PhD in Geophysics from the University of Washington, Seattle. He was a GeoPRISMS Postdoctoral Fellow in the University of California, Santa Cruz. Abhijit is a seismologist interested in understanding wide spectrum of fault behaviors in a holistic way. His research focus includes slow earthquakes, array seismology and earthquake interactions. He designs and carries out seismic experiments in different parts of the world including Alaska, Nepal, New Zealand, Cascadia and California.

Public Lecture: How earthquake faults shift gears

Technical Lecture: Broad spectrum of fault slip: fast, slow and everything in between

2018-2019 Host Institutions
  • University of California, Santa Barbara | November 8, 2018
  • University of Wisconsin-River Falls | May 1, 2019
  • University of Montana | April 10, 2019
  • Montana Tech – Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology | April 11, 2019
  • Missouri University of Science and Technology | April 15, 2019

Past DLP Speakers 2017 – 2018


2017 – 2018

Cynthia Ebinger

Dr. Cynthia Ebinger holds the Marshall-Heape Chair in Geology at Tulane University. She received her BS in marine geology from Duke University, and a MS and PhD from the MIT–Woods Hole Oceanographic Joint Program in Oceanography. She completed her postdoctoral training at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and through a NATO fellowship at the University of Leeds. Her research focuses on plate boundary deformation processes, with focus on volcano and earthquake processes in marine and continental settings. Specifically, her data acquisition and modeling probe the response of Earth’s plates to stresses induced by the movement of faults and the flow of magma and volatiles. As a geophysicist, she utilizes a range of signal processing and analytical and numerical modeling, studies of rock properties and Earth deformation processes, linking geological and geophysical data sets. The goal of her research teams is to understand the basic physics of fundamental Earth processes.

Public Lecture: Recipe for continental rifting: Flavors of East Africa

Technical Lecture: Earthquakes within continental plates: How, where, and why it matters 

2017-2018 Host Institutions
  • Florida International University | October 13, 2017
  • Michigan Technological University | November 13, 2017
  • Marshall University | February 21, 2018
  • Weber State University | March 15-16, 2018
  • New Mexico Tech | February 15-16, 2018

  Watch the Technical Lecture given by Cindy Ebinger at Marshall University in February 2018.


  Watch the Technical Lecture given by Cindy Ebinger at New Mexico Tech in February 2018.

Watch the video


Esteban Gazel

Dr. Esteban Gazel is an Associate Professor at the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Cornell University. He uses geochemical and petrological tools to understand intraplate magmatism, subduction zone processes, and deep Earth geochemical cycles. Ongoing projects include the evolution of mantle plumes (from Large Igneous Provinces to modern hotspots), the role of island arcs in the generation of continental crust, and volatile budgets in the mantle. His research approach integrates a combination of field, lab, statistical, and theoretical methods with interdisciplinary collaboration with other fields in Earth Science.

Public Lecture: The rocks that joined the Americas: Is there a connection with climate and evolution of life?

Technical Lecture: Making young continents in arcs

2017-2018 Host Institutions
  • National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution | October 11-12, 2017
  • California State University East Bay | October 25, 2017
  • Hamilton College | April 12, 2018
  • California University of Pennsylvania | September 20, 2017
  • Miami University | March 2, 2018
2016-2017 Host Institutions
  • National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution | postponed, Fall 2017
  • University of Nevada, Las Vegas | February 15, 2017
  • University of Nevada, Reno | February 13, 2017
  • California State University East Bay | postponed, Fall 2017

Heather Savage

Dr. Heather Savage is an Associate Research Professor at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Using both laboratory experiments and field studies, her research focuses on understanding the strength and stability of faults in order to improve our ability to assess when and where large earthquakes occur.  Heather is particularly interested in identifying seismic signatures of ancient earthquakes in the rock record that provide windows into the processes that occur during earthquakes. She has worked in a variety of geologic settings, studying faults in California, Nevada, Oklahoma, Vermont, Alaska, Wyoming, Japan, and Italy.

Public lecture: The science and pseudoscience of earthquake prediction

Technical lecture: Understanding deformation in fault zones over multiple seismic cycles

2017-2018 Host Institutions
  • Colby College | November 27, 2017
  • Bates College | November 28, 2017
  • Bowdoin College | November 29, 2017
  • Lafayette College | October 27, 2017
  • University of Alaska Fairbanks | Fall 2018
2016-2017 Host Institutions
  • Boston University | February 14, 2017
  • Bates College | postponed, Fall 2017
  • Bowdoin College | postponed, Fall 2017
  • Colby College | postponed, Fall 2017
  • Central Washington University | April 28, 2017
  • University of Washington | April 27, 2017

Brandon Schmandt

Dr. Brandon Schmandt is an Assistant Professor in the Earth and Planetary Science Department at the University of New Mexico. His research primarily uses observational seismology to investigate tectonic and magmatic processes. Recently he is involved in a collaborative project to investigate melt generation, melt transport, and crustal evolution in the Cascades arc at Mount St. Helens (www.imush.org). The project includes multi-scale seismic arrays, magnetotelluric imaging, and petrologic analyses. The subset of the seismic studies lead by UNM uses two weeks of continuous recording with a 900-geophone array concentrated within about 12 km of Mount St. Helens. Presentations will largely focus on this hybrid active and passive source portion of the project and place those results in the broader context of recent advanced views of magmatic processes at Mount St. Helens.

Public Lecture: Exploring the roots of volcanoes with seismology ( icon-file slides)

Technical Lecture: Investigation of Mount St. Helens earthquakes and magma plumbing with a hybrid natural and controlled source seismic survey ( icon-file slides)

2017-2018 Host Institutions
  • California State University Bakersfield | November 9, 2017
  • Stanford University | February 15, 2018
  • University of Missouri | April 13, 2018
  • University of Oregon | May 8-9, 2018
  • Oregon State University | May 10, 2018
2016-2017 Host Institutions
  • Allegheny College | November 3-5, 2016
  • University of Puerto Rico | October 13-16, 2016
  • Boise State University | November 16, 2016
  • Idaho State University | November 17, 2016
  • New Mexico State University | April 12, 2017

icon-chevron-left Current Speakers     DLP 2016 – 2017  

Apply to host a GeoPRISMS Distinguished Speaker

GeoPRISMS Distinguished Lectureship Program (DLP), 2016 – 2017

Deadline: July 1, 2016

Download the brochure

The GeoPRISMS Office is happy to announce the annual GeoPRISMS Distinguished Lectureship Program for academic year 2016-2017 with an outstanding speakers list. Distinguished scientists involved with GeoPRISMS science are available to visit US colleges and universities to present technical and public lectures on subjects related to GeoPRISMS science.

Any US college or university can apply to host a DLP speaker. Applications are due July 1, 2016 for visiting speakers in Fall 2016 and Spring 2017. Institutions that are not currently involved with GeoPRISMS research are strongly encouraged to apply, including those granting undergraduate or masters degrees, as well as those with PhD programs. Institutions may request a technical and/or public lecture. The GeoPRISMS Office will cover airfare for speakers’ travel and will coordinate travel and off-site logistics. Host institutions are responsible for local expenses for the duration of the visit.

Visit the GeoPRISMS website to apply and learn more about the speakers and talks available:

http://geoprisms.org/education/distinguished-lectureship-program/

Also, please review the DLP Best Practices for making the most of your visiting speaker:

http://geoprisms.org/education/distinguished-lectureship-program/best-practices/

Please direct any questions to the GeoPRISMS Office at info@geoprisms.org

The GeoPRISMS Office

———————————————————

2016-2017 Speakers:

Esteban Gazel (Virginia Tech)
Public Lecture: The rocks that joined the Americas: Is there a connection with climate and evolution of life?
Technical Lecture: Making young continents in arcs
Beatrice Magnani (Southern Methodist University)
Public lecture: The legacy of ancient plate boundaries in continental intraplate deformation
Technical lecture: Short- and long-lived deformation in the Central US and implications for discriminating between natural and induced seismicity
Heather Savage (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)
Public lecture: The science and pseudoscience of earthquake prediction
Technical lecture: Understanding deformation in fault zones over multiple seismic cycles
Brandon Schmandt (University of New Mexico)
Public Lecture: Exploring the roots of volcanoes with seismology
Technical Lecture: Investigation of Mount St. Helens earthquakes and magma plumbing with a hybrid natural and controlled source seismic survey

Past DLP Speakers 2016 – 2017


2016 – 2017

Esteban Gazel

Dr. Esteban Gazel is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Geosciences at Virginia Tech. He uses geochemical and petrological tools to understand intraplate magmatism, subduction zone processes, and deep Earth geochemical cycles. Ongoing projects include the evolution of mantle plumes (from Large Igneous Provinces to modern hotspots), the role of island arcs in the generation of continental crust, and volatile budgets in the mantle. His research approach integrates a combination of field, lab, statistical, and theoretical methods with interdisciplinary collaboration with other fields in Earth Science.

Public Lecture: The rocks that joined the Americas: Is there a connection with climate and evolution of life?

Technical Lecture: Making young continents in arcs

2016-2017 Host Institutions
  • National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution | Fall 2017
  • University of Nevada, Las Vegas | February 15, 2017
  • University of Nevada, Reno | February 13, 2017
  • California State University East Bay | Fall 2017

Beatrice Magnani

Dr. Beatrice Magnani is a seismologist at Southern Methodist University whose overarching research theme is the formation, evolution of continents, and continental dynamics. Dr. Magnani employs controlled-source seismology to image continents at a wide range of scales and resolutions, from the lithosphere to the near surface. Her research interests include the Eastern North American passive margin structure and evolution (ENAM Community Seismic Experiment Project), seismic oceanography, and glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) investigations in the Patagonian Andes.

Public lecture: The legacy of ancient plate boundaries in continental intraplate deformation

Technical lecture: Short- and long-lived deformation in the Central US and implications for discriminating between natural and induced seismicity

2016-2017 Host Institutions
  • Appalachian State University | April 7, 2017
  • Texas A&M, Kingsville | February 28, 2017
  • Fort Lewis College | March 23, 2017
  • University of Utah | March 9, 2017
2015-2016 Host Institutions
  • Boston College | November 17, 2015
  • Marshall University | October 30, 2015
  • Stanford University | May 12, 2016

  Watch the Technical Lecture given by Beatrice Magnani at Marshall University in October 2015.
  Watch the Public Lecture given by Beatrice Magnani at Marshall University in October 2015.


Heather Savage

Dr. Heather Savage is an Associate Research Professor at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Using both laboratory experiments and field studies, her research focuses on understanding the strength and stability of faults in order to improve our ability to assess when and where large earthquakes occur.  Heather is particularly interested in identifying seismic signatures of ancient earthquakes in the rock record that provide windows into the processes that occur during earthquakes. She has worked in a variety of geologic settings, studying faults in California, Nevada, Oklahoma, Vermont, Alaska, Wyoming, Japan, and Italy.

Public lecture: The science and pseudoscience of earthquake prediction

Technical lecture: Understanding deformation in fault zones over multiple seismic cycles

2016-2017 Host Institutions
  • Boston University | February 14, 2017
  • Bates College | Fall 2017
  • Bowdoin College | Fall 2017
  • Colby College | Fall 2017
  • Central Washington University | April 28, 2017
  • University of Washington | April 27, 2017

Brandon Schmandt

Dr. Brandon Schmandt is an Assistant Professor in the Earth and Planetary Science Department at the University of New Mexico. His research primarily uses observational seismology to investigate tectonic and magmatic processes operating near plate boundaries and beneath plate interiors. Recently he is involved in a collaborative project to investigate melt generation, melt transport, and crustal evolution in the Cascades arc at Mount St. Helens. The seismic component of the project uses a multi-scale combination of seismic arrays, including two weeks of continuous recording with a 900-geophone array concentrated within about 12 km of Mount St. Helens.

Public Lecture: Exploring the roots of volcanoes with seismology

Technical Lecture: Investigation of Mount St. Helens earthquakes and magma plumbing with a hybrid natural and controlled source seismic survey 

2016-2017 Host Institutions
  • Allegheny College | November 3-5, 2016
  • University of Puerto Rico | October 13-16, 2016
  • Boise State University | November 16, 2016
  • Idaho State University | November 17, 2016
  • New Mexico State University | April 12, 2017

 icon-chevron-left DLP 2017-2018     DLP 2015 – 2016 icon-chevron-right

Video Lecture Series


Recordings of Distinguished Speakers available on Youtube.

Cynthia Ebinger at New Mexico Tech |  icon-video-camera WATCH VIDEO

Past DLP Speakers 2015 – 2016


Elizabeth Cottrell

Dr. Elizabeth Cottrell is a curator in the Department of Mineral Sciences at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution where she serves as the Director of the Global Volcanism Program. Liz conducts experiments at high pressures and temperatures to understand the evolution of Earth’s mantle, from the time of planetary accretion and core formation to today. Currently she is focused on understanding how oxygen, hydrogen and carbon cycle between mantle reservoirs, and how this influences the petrogenesis of Earth’s crust and the deep carbon cycle. Liz received her PhD from Columbia University and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Geophysical Laboratory at Carnegie before joining the Smithsonian in 2007.

Public Lecture: Volcanoes: Windows to the Deep

Technical Lecture: Oxygen Cycling Through Subduction Zones and The Generation of Continents

2015-2016 Host Institutions
  • Northeastern Illinois University | March 10, 2016
  • UC, Davis | January 13, 2016
  • Vanderbilt University | March 4, 2016
2014-2015 Host Institutions
  • The Community College of Baltimore County | December 1, 2014
  • Drexel University | January 15, 2015
  • IMax Theater, Challenger Learning Center of Tallahassee, Fl | February 2, 2015
  • Florida State University | February 3, 2015
  • University of Vermont | February 23, 2015
 icon-youtube-play Watch the Public Lecture given by Liz Cottrell at Drexel University in January 2015.

 icon-youtube-play Watch the Technical Lecture given by Liz Cottrell at the University of Vermont in February 2015.

 icon-youtube-play Watch the Public Lecture given by Liz Cottrell at the Imax of the Challenger Learning Center in Tallahassee, Florida in February 2015.


Bradley Hacker

Dr. Bradley Hacker is a Professor in the Department of Earth Science at UC Santa Barbara. His research focuses on field, laboratory, and theoretical study of tectonics using a combination of metamorphic petrology, structural geology, mineral physics, and geochronology. Particular topics of interest include continental subduction, continental collision, and ophiolite emplacement Applied tools are chiefly electron-backscatter diffraction, electron-probe microanalysis, and laser-ablation inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometry.

Public Lecture: Earth’s Tempo: The Bleeding Edge of Geochronology

Technical Lecture: Differentiation of the Continental Crust by Relamination ( icon-file-text 9 Mb)

2015-2016 Host Institutions
  • Louisiana State University | April 8, 2016
  • Lehigh University | April 15, 2016
  • Missouri State University | April 4, 2016
2014-2015 Host Institutions
  • UMASS Amherst | April 3, 2015
  • University of Connecticut | April 7, 2015
  • University of Wisconsin Oshkosh | March 5, 2015
  • University of New Hampshire | April 2, 2015

Beatrice Magnani

Dr. Beatrice Magnani is a seismologist at Southern Methodist University whose overarching research theme is the formation, evolution of continents, and continental dynamics. Dr. Magnani employs controlled-source seismology to image continents at a wide range of scales and resolutions, from the lithosphere to the near surface. Her research interests include the Eastern North American passive margin structure and evolution (ENAM Community Seismic Experiment Project), seismic oceanography, and GIA investigations in the Patagonian Andes.

Public lecture: The legacy of ancient plate boundaries in continental intraplate deformation

Technical lecture: From plate boundary to intraplate: understanding the role of paleotectonic structures in continental intraplate deformation

  Watch the Technical Lecture given by Beatrice Magnani at Marshall University in October 2015.

 icon-youtube-play Watch the Public Lecture given by Beatrice Magnani at Marshall University in October 2015.

2015-2016 Host Institutions
  • Boston College | November 17, 2015
  • Marshall University | October 30, 2015
  • Stanford University | May 12, 2016

Andy Nyblade

Dr. Andy Nyblade is Professor of Geosciences at Penn State University. He uses seismic recordings of earthquakes to interrogate earth structure in continental settings to understand deep earth processes linked to rifting, plateau uplift, volcanism, basin evolution, mountain building, crustal genesis and craton formation. For the past 10 years, he has led the AfricaArray initiative to build science capacity in Africa and the U.S. through coupled data gathering, research and education programs. He has worked extensively throughout eastern and southern Africa for over 25 years, where much of his research has focused on imaging the African superplume.

Public lecture: The Formation of the Great Rift Valley in East Africa: Is there a Connection with Human Origins?

Technical lecture: Cenozoic Rifting, Plateau Uplift, and Volcanism in Eastern Africa and the African Superplume

2015-2016 Host Institutions
  • Eastern Kentucky University | March 22-23, 2016
  • Montclair State University | February 8-9, 2016
  • University of Akron | February 25-26, 2016
2014-2015 Host Institutions
  • University of California San Diego, SCRIPPS Institution | March 30, 2015
  • Utah Valley University | March 31, 2015
  • Southern Methodist University | April 1, 2015
 icon-youtube-play Watch the Public Lecture given by Andy Nyblade at Montclair State University in February 2016.

 icon-youtube-play Watch the Public Lecture given by Andy Nyblade at Eastern Kentucky University in March 2016.


Robert Stern

Dr. Robert J. Stern is Professor of Geosciences at the University of Texas at Dallas. His research focuses on three complementary themes: 1) How modern arc crust forms above subductions zones and evolves into true continental crust; 2) How new subduction zones form; and 3) When and why Plate Tectonics began on Earth. He and his students and collaborators emphasize geochemical and isotopic data sets to investigate examples around the globe, both on land and beneath the sea. Active areas of study include modern examples of arc and backarc basin igneous activity in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana, Japan, Central American and Aleutian arcs, and ancient examples in Afro-Arabia and Iran.

Public Lecture: Geoscientific Investigations of the Southern Mariana Trench and the Challenger Deep ( icon-file-text 14 Mb)

Technical Lecture: Convergent Plate Margins, Subduction Zones, and Island Arcs ( icon-file-text 7 Mb)

2015-2016 Host Institutions
  • University of South Florida | March 30-31,2016 (Visit to University of Florida April 1, 2016)
  • West Virginia University | April 14, 2016
  • Montana State University | April 21, 2016
2014-2015 Host Institutions
  • Kansas State University | March 26, 2015
  • University of Iowa | November 13, 2015
  • Dickinson State University | April 20, 2015

Laura Wallace

Dr. Laura Wallace is a Research Scientist at the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics. Laura uses geodetic methods to investigate deformation of the Earth’s crust at plate boundaries, with a particular focus on subduction zones. She undertakes research at various locations in the western Pacific. She is particularly interested in understanding the physical mechanisms that control subduction thrust earthquakes and slow slip events. She is currently leading a large-scale international project to deploy ocean bottom seismometers and seafloor geodetic instruments to investigate slow slip events offshore New Zealand. Prior to her arrival at the University of Texas, Laura was a research scientist at GNS Science in New Zealand for nearly a decade.

Public Lecture: The slow slip revolution: Leading to a better understanding of earthquakes

Technical Lecture: Sticky or Slippery? Controls on subduction megathrust behavior at the Hikurangi subduction margin, New Zealand

2015-2016 Host Institutions
  • Iowa State University | November 17, 2015
  • Penn State University | February 2, 2016
  • University of Montana | November 16, 2015

 icon-chevron-left DLP 2016-2017     DLP 2014 – 2015 icon-chevron-right


DLP Application Form 2018-2019


Application now closed. Contact the GeoPRISMS office if you have any questions.

Application deadline: July 1, 2018

Fields marked with a * are required.

Instructions: Please provide as much of the information requested as possible below, and be sure to carefully read the Best Practices document.

If you have difficulty submitting this form, please contact the GeoPRISMS Office. Due to the large number of requests for DLP speakers, and the limited number of engagements each DLP speaker can undertake, not all applications can be fullfilled, nor can all first choices of speaker. Please provide as much information below as possible to ensure your institution has the best chance of receiving a speaker. Upon completion and submission of this form, you will receive a confirmation email containing your responses for your records.


Section 1. Host Contact Information

Please provide all the information indicated below. Please note that this section is required.


Section 2. Institution Information

Please tell us about your institution: its faculty, staff, students, and expected lecture attendance. Please note that this section is required.

Please give us an idea of the size of your department or institution. These fields are optional.


Section 3. Speaker Request

Please select your first and second choice of speakers and indicate the presentation(s) you would like them to deliver (public vs. technical talk). Please note that your first choice may not be available.

* Please note that first choice may not be available


Section 4. Lecture Scheduling

Please tell us about your institution's ideal schedule. It is helpful for us to know both periods of availability and unavailability. This section is optional.

Please indicate up to three preferred time periods when you would like a DLP speaker to visit and present. Please provide the start and end dates for each preferred period. Note that the preferred period may not be fullfilled.

Please indicate up to three periods of time when your institution would prefer not to host a Distinguished speaker. Please indicate start and end dates of non-preferred periods.


Section 5. Other Information

Please let us know a little bit more about your application. This section is optional.


Section 6. Acknowledgements and Submission

Please read the following statements fully and with care. You must agree to them all to submit your application to host a DLP speaker. If you have any questions about these conditions, please contact the GeoPRISMS Office. Please note that this section is required.

Past DLP Speakers 2010 – 2011


Paul Umhoefer

Dr. Paul Umhoefer is Professor of Geology in the School of Earth Sciences & Environmental Sustainability at Northern Arizona University. He studies the tectonics of the upper crust at young and active divergent and oblique-divergent plate boundaries and continental rifts. Paul and his students and colleagues combine field and lab data to study how faults and basins develop in these settings, and the role of tectonics and climate in controlling these processes. Paul’s current work is centered on the southern Baja California peninsula, the Lake Mead area of the central Basin and Range, and south-central Turkey.

Public Lecture: Lessons for Understanding Ancient Mountain Belts from the Modern Gulf of California

Technical Lecture: How Plate Tectonics Works in the Southern Gulf of California: A Rapid Birth in a Hot Setting

2011 Host Institutions
  • Oklahoma State University | April 5, 2011
  • University of North Texas| April 7, 2011
  • University of Houston | April 15, 2011

Peter van Keken

Dr. Peter van Keken is a geophysicist at the University of Michigan who uses computational methods to study the causes and consequences of plate tectonics. He focuses on the long term chemical and thermal evolution of the Earth, the dynamics of mantle plumes and the structure and evolution of subduction zones. Within GeoPRISMs he works in interdisciplinary projects focusing on the cycling of volatiles in subduction zones and their role in generating earthquakes and arc volcanism.

Public Lecture: When Earth Attacks: Why an Old Planet Causes Volcanoes and Earthquakes

Technical Lecture: Dynamics of Subduction Zones and the Recycling of Water to the Deep Earth

2011 Host Institutions
  • University of Texas at Dallas | April 22, 2011
  • Texas A&M, Galveston | April 26, 2011
  • University of South Florida | March 4, 2011

Emily Brodsky

Dr. Emily Brodsky is an earthquake physicist at the University of California, Santa Cruz who studies the processes that start earthquakes and the forces on faults that inhibit slipusing a variety of tools from seismology, experimental rheology, hydrogeology and structural geology. She also studies explosive volcanism, landslides and glacial slip. Prof. Brodsky earned her B.A. from Harvard in 1995, PhD from the Caltech in 2001 and was a 2001 Miller Fellow at the University of California Berkeley. She is the recipient of the inaugaural 2005 Charles Richter Early Career award from the Seismological Society of America and the 2008 James Macelwane Medal from the American Geophysical Union.

Public Lecture: Seismic Waves that Trigger Earthquakes

Technical Lecture: The interaction between fault zone structure and rheology

2011 Host Institutions
  • New Mexico Tech | March 3, 2011
  • New Mexico State | March 2, 2011
  • Fort Lewis College | February 28, 2011
  • San Francisco State | February 22, 2011

Chris Goldfinger

Dr. Chris Goldfinger is a marine geologist and geophysicist with a focus on great earthquakes and structure of subduction zones around the world. He has experience with deep submersibles, sidescan sonar, seismic reflection, and other marine geophysical tools on over 30 oceanographic cruises over the last 20 years. He is currently working on great subduction earthquakes along the Cascadia and Sumatran margins, as well as the Northern San Andreas Fault off northern California using the evidence for earthquakes found in deep-sea sediments.
Chris is an Associate Professor of Marine Geology and received his PhD from Oregon State University in 1994.

Public Lecture: Great Submarine Earthquakes, the Riddle of the Sands

Technical Lecture: Earthquake Recurrence, Segmentation, and Stress Triggering on the Cascadia Margin

2011 Host Institutions
  • Duke University
  • University of Maryland
  • University of Idaho
  • James Madison University

Rudy Slingerland

Rudy Slingerland’s research group studies the evolution of morphodynamic systems such as deltas, rivers, and shallow marine shelves by coupling theory, often in the form of dynamical models, with observations in the field and subsurface. Our ultimate goal is develop predictive theories for the behavior of these systems and the stratal record of their deposits.
Rudy Slingerland is a Professor of Geology in the Department of Geosciences at the Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.

Public lecture: How River Deltas Work: The Patterns and Dynamics of Distributive Fluvial Systems

Technical lecture: Building a Continental Shelf One Grain at a Time

2011 Host Institutions
  • Illinois State | February 8, 2011
  • Winona State | February 7, 2011
  • Michigan State | March 25, 2011

Katherine Kelley

Katherine Kelley uses geochemical methods to examine the processes of magma formation and evolution in a variety of tectonic settings. She utilizes and develops micro-analytical techniques in geochemistry to probe the compositions of natural glasses and mineral inclusions. Her research currently focuses on constraining the importance of volatile species (esp. water) to mantle and magmatic processes at subduction zones and mid-ocean ridges, developing geochemical tracers of material cycling through subduction zones, and modeling the long-term effects of subduction on the geochemical evolution of the earth’s interior. She has worked on volcanoes from the Mariana islands, the Philippines and Indonesia, ODP drill sites 801 and 1149 in the Pacific plate, and a global sampling of submarine spreading ridges. Katie is an Assistant Professor of Geological Oceanography at the Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island.

Public Lecture: The volatile story of subduction zone volcanism

Technical Lecture: The role of water in mantle melting and mass transfer processes at subduction zones

2011 Host Institutions
  • University of Buffalo | March 22, 2011
  • Syracuse University | March 24, 2011
  • Western Washington | April 18-19, 2011
  • Oregon State | April 21, 2011

Becky Dorsey

Becky Dorsey studies the stratigraphic record of basin development at tectonically active continental margins. Becky and her students combine field data with collaborative studies of geochronology, paleomagnetism, geochemistry, and paleontology to assess the tectonic, climatic, and eustatic controls on deposition in ancient sedimentary basins. Current work in southern California and NW Mexico is aimed at understanding the timing, rates, and processes of oblique rifting and continental rupture along the Pacific-North America plate boundary. Becky is a Professor of Geology in the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Oregon, Eugene, OR.

 Public Lecture: The Secret Life of Basins: A Stratigraphic Record of the Southern San Andreas Fault

Technical Lecture: Crustal recycling along an oblique-divergent plate boundary: from the Colorado Plateau to the Salton Trough and Gulf of California

2011 Host Institutions
  • Cal Poly Pomona | February 10, 2011
  • UCLA | April 21, 2011
  • CSU Fresno | April 10, 2011
  • UC Santa Cruz | April 19, 2011

DLP 2011 – 2012

Past DLP Speakers 2011 – 2012


Paul Umhoefer

Dr. Paul Umhoefer is Professor of Geology in the School of Earth Sciences & Environmental Sustainability at Northern Arizona University. He studies the tectonics of the upper crust at young and active divergent and oblique-divergent plate boundaries and continental rifts. Paul and his students and colleagues combine field and lab data to study how faults and basins develop in these settings, and the role of tectonics and climate in controlling these processes. Paul’s current work is centered on the southern Baja California peninsula, the Lake Mead area of the central Basin and Range, and south-central Turkey.

 Public Lecture: Lessons for Understanding Ancient Mountain Belts from the Modern Gulf of California

Technical Lecture: How Plate Tectonics Works in the Southern Gulf of California: A Rapid Birth in a Hot Setting

2012 Host Institutions
  • University of the Pacific | February 29, 2012
  • California State University, Fullerton | March 2, 2012
  • Chapman College | March 5, 2012
  • University of California, Santa Barbara | March 1, 2012

Peter van Keken

Dr. Peter van Keken is a geophysicist at the University of Michigan who uses computational methods to study the causes and consequences of plate tectonics. He focuses on the long term chemical and thermal evolution of the Earth, the dynamics of mantle plumes and the structure and evolution of subduction zones. Within GeoPRISMs he works in interdisciplinary projects focusing on the cycling of volatiles in subduction zones and their role in generating earthquakes and arc volcanism.

Public Lecture: When Earth Attacks: Why an Old Planet Causes Volcanoes and Earthquakes

Technical Lecture: Dynamics of Subduction Zones and the Recycling of Water to the Deep Earth

2012 Host Institutions
  • Rutgers University
  • University of California, Davis | May 23, 2012
  • Stanford University | April 24, 2012
  • Grand Valley State University | October 15, 2012
  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute | May 2, 2012

Harm van Avendonk

Dr. Harm Van Avendonk is a seismologist at the University of Texas at Austin who uses active-source seismic data to investigate the evolution of plate boundaries. At divergent plate boundaries he studies the role of faults in the thinning of continental margins, and the exhumation of continental mantle.  He is also interested in the development of sedimentary basins on subsiding margins. At subduction zones he studies the effect of water on the physical properties of the plate interface. He has also made estimates of the amount of water stored in the subduction oceanic lithosphere offshore Nicaragua and Costa Rica.

Public Lecture: The Life Cycle of Rifted Margins

Technical Lecture: Extension of Continental Crust at the Eastern Grand Banks, Newfoundland

2012 Host Institutions
  • University of Hawaii | February 17, 2012
  • University of Memphis | November 11, 2011
  • UMass, Amherst | April 27, 2012

John Swenson

John Swenson studies the morphodynamics of fluvial and shallow-marine systems, with an emphasis on the coupling between these depositional environments. His work focuses on clinoform dynamics, shoreline response to sea-level change, and avulsion and lobe switching in distributary-channel networks. He develops mathematical models that predict how these linked depositional systems evolve and what that evolution leaves behind in the sedimentary record. John is an Associate Professor of Geology in the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, MN.

Public Lecture: Holocene Evolution of the Waipaoa Fluvio-Deltaic System: A Source-to-Sink Perspective

Technical Lecture: Predictive Models for Avulsion Frequency and Lobe Dimensions on Wave-Influenced Deltas

2012 Host Institutions
  • Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Alison Shaw

Dr. Alison Shaw is a geochemist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, whose research focuses on understanding the role of volatiles such as H2O, CO2 and S in magmatic systems. She studies the chemical composition of rocks, gases, fluids and melt inclusions to quantify volatile fluxes and to identify how volatiles are modified during transfer to and from the mantle. She is currently working on projects at various subduction zones along the Pacific’s “ring of fire”, including the Mariana arc, the Izu-Bonin arc, the Central American arc and the Kamchatkan arc.

Public lecture: Subduction and the Earth’s Deep Carbon Cycle

Technical lecture: The Chemical Consequences of Slab Dehydration Across Subduction Zones

2012 Host Institutions
  • Bryn Mawr College | February 14, 2012
  • State University of New York, Stony Brook
  • Cornell University | February 1, 2012

Geoff Abers

Dr. Geoffrey Abers uses the tools of earthquake seismology to illuminate at depth the processes by which material cycles through active plate boundaries, and the manner in which they deform. He has deployed broadband seismic arrays in a variety of rifts and subduction zones around the Pacific rim. These imaging arrays are used to follow the evolution subducting crust to sub-arc depths, to understand dynamic processes within the mantle beneath volcanoes, and to better understand fault dynamics. Geoff is a Lamont Research Professor at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

Public Lecture: How Water Deep in the Earth Controls Earthquakes and Volcanoes

Technical Lecture: Imaging with Geophysics: The Heat and Water Cycling in Modern Subduction Zones

2012 Host Institutions
  • Fort Hays State University | February 27, 2012
  • Northwest Missouri State University | March 2, 2012
  • University of Arizona | April 12, 2012
  • University of Colorado, Boulder | February 29, 2012

Steve Holbrook

Steve Holbrook is a marine seismologist who has sailed on 15 research cruises studying subjects varying from continental margin structure to seismic oceanography. He is a native of eastern Pennsylvania and did his undergraduate degree in geoscience at Penn State. He worked for Chevron in San Francisco before doing his MS and PhD degrees in geophysics at Stanford. Following his PhD, Steve joined the scientific staff of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, where he worked for nearly nine years before joining the faculty at the University of Wyoming.

Public Lecture: Arcs, Continents, and the Andesite Paradox

Technical Lecture: The Subduction Sponge: Mantle Serpentinization in the Downgoing Plate

2012 Host Institutions
  • Marshall University | March 28, 2012
  • Texas Tech University | February 3, 2012
  • Utah State University | February 6, 2012
  • Virginia Tech | March 30, 2012

 

Watch the Public Lecture given by Steve Holbrook at Marshall University in March 2012.

Watch the Technical Lecture given by Steve Holbrook at Marshall University in March 2012.


Katie Keranen

Dr. Katie Keranen is Assistant Professor of Geophysics in the School of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Oklahoma. She studies the tectonics of the crust in active continental rifts and convergent plate margins. Katie earned her PhD from Stanford in 2008 and was a USGS Mendenhall Post-doctoral Fellow. Katie and her students combine active- and passive-source seismic data with potential field data in rift settings to study how rifts form and evolve, and the role of magmatism, thermal state, and structural boundaries in controlling these processes. Katie’s current work in extensional settings is focused on the Main Ethiopian Rift and the Eastern California Shear Zone-Walker Lane.

Public Lecture: Controls on Continental Breakup: Understanding Active Processes Along the East African Rift

Technical Lecture: Extension Beyond the Rift Boundaries: Magmatism, Heat, and Depth-Dependent Deformation in Ethiopia

2012 Host Institutions
  • Carleton College
  • University of Northern Iowa
  • Idaho State University

DLP 2012 – 2013     DLP 2010 – 2011 icon-chevron-right