Job Posting: Faculty & Postdoctoral Research Associate Positions


1) Multiple Tenure-track Faculty Positions in Earth Sciences – Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

2) 4 Postdoctoral Research Associate Positions on Tectonics, Seismology, Structural Geology and Earthquake Impact Assessment in East Africa

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1) Multiple Tenure-track Faculty Positions in Earth Sciences – Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

Academia Sinica is the premier, state-funded research organization in Taiwan. The Institute of Earth Sciences (IES), one of the 31 institutes of Academia Sinica, has strong and active research programs in solid-Earth geophysics and geochemistry with state-of-the-art analytical and computational facilities. The institute also operates several field observation networks in Taiwan and other parts of Asia. Current research in IES includes seismological and geodetic studies, regional and global tectonics, geodynamics, gravity and geomagnetic analysis, high pressure mineral physics, isotope geochemistry, orogeny, igneous and metamorphic petrology, cosmochemistry, and marine geochemistry. We invite outstanding candidates to apply for several tenure-track faculty positions at all levels of seniority. The positions are open to all research areas that strengthen or complement the aforementioned fields, and we especially encourage applicants with expertise in geochemistry, mineral physics, and tectonics. Candidates must have a Ph.D. degree and an excellent record of independent research. Interested applicants please send a curriculum vitae including a full list of publications, three or more names of references (with affiliation and contact information), and a research plan to shewen@gate.sinica.edu.tw. Review of the applications will begin on October 1, 2017, and continue until the positions are filled. For more detailed information about IES, please visit http://www.earth.sinica.edu.tw.

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2) 4 Postdoctoral Research Associate Positions on Tectonics, Seismology, Structural Geology and Earthquake Impact Assessment in East Africa

Applications are invited for a series of four Research Associate positions in Tectonics, Seismology, Structural Geology and Earthquake Impact Assessment within the recently funded Global Challenges project on Seismic Resilience in East Africa (PREPARE). Developing countries in East Africa are at high seismic risk because traditional masonry structures are unreinforced and seismically vulnerable and large earthquakes of M7.0 or greater can occur along the East African Rift. Conventionally, seismic hazard assessment is carried out using an instrumental earthquake catalogue alone, but in a region of slow strain, such as East Africa, the catalogue is short in duration in comparison with average recurrence periods of large faults (e.g. 50 years versus thousands of years). In developing countries, the lack of basic information is particularly acute. The critical knowledge gap in research and practice lies in: (1) accuracy of tectonic earthquake source models, from which seismic hazard maps and seismic design spectra are derived, and (2) seismic vulnerability of bespoke constructions in East Africa.

The Research Associate in Seismology (Geophysics Group, School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol) will initially focus on assessing seismic hazards based on existing instrument catalogues.  However, it is hoped that temporary networks will be installed to improve coverage and lower detection levels for seismicity. This may involve fieldwork to deploy instruments in southern Malawi. In conjunction with other postdocs mapping faulting and ground motion using geodetic measurements, this information will be used to redefine the tectonic earthquake source models for the region. There is flexibility in the scope of the hazard assessment, with the ultimate goal of seisimic hazard assessment across the entire East Africa Rift System.

The closing date for applications is Oct 1st and interviews are expected to be held in the week of October 16th.

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/jobs/find/details.html?nPostingID=6393&nPostingTargetID=25594&option=30&sort=ASC&respnr=4&ID=Q50FK026203F3VBQBV7V77V83&Resultsperpage=10&lg=UK&mask=uobext

This Research Associate in Tectonics (Geophysics Group, School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol) will focus on strain mapping in the amagmatic Malawi Rift, using data from the Sentinel-1 satellite and reoccupying a network of 10 campaign GPS sites established in 2016.  The high-resolution maps of the surface strain field will address questions regarding which branch of the rift is active, the degree of strain localization and the distribution between border faults. In conjunction with the postdocs mapping faulting and seismicity, this information will be used to redefine the tectonic earthquake source models for the region. There is flexibility between postdoc positions, and depending on workload and interest, the postdoc could also get involved in using high resolution DEMs from satellite data to map fault scarps in the region, and with other countries in the East African Rift

The closing date for applications is Oct 1st and interviews are expected to be held in the week of October 16th.

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/jobs/find/details.html?nPostingID=6392&nPostingTargetID=25578&option=30&sort=ASC&respnr=4&ID=Q50FK026203F3VBQBV7V77V83&Resultsperpage=10&lg=UK&mask=uobext

The Research Associate in Structural Geology (Solid Earth Group, School of Ocean and Earth Sciences, University of Cardiff) will focus on fault mapping, based on existing maps and new fieldwork in the southern East African Rift. Although geological maps exist for Malawi, these are at regional to national scale, and generally focus on lithological distribution. Thus, the RA will use existing geological and geophysical data to create a national fault map, and refine this map through new fieldwork. Detailed field mapping and sampling of fault zones will also address questions on the degree to which the current fault system is reactivating older faults, shear zones, and fabrics. This work involves modern techniques at a range of scales, including Structure from Motion and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Depending on time, the project may also involve other countries in the East African Rift.

In conjunction with other RAs mapping strain and seismicity, the fault mapping information will be used to redefine the tectonic earthquake source models for the region. There is flexibility between RA positions, and depending on workload and interest, the RA could also get involved in using high resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) from satellite data to map fault scarps in the region.

The closing date for applications is Sept 29th and interviews are expected to be held in the week of October 16th.

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/jobs. Search for 6421BR.

The Research Associate in Earthquake Impact Assessment (Earthquake and Geotechnical Engineering Group, Queen’s School of Engineering, University of Bristol) will implement a comprehensive earthquake risk impact assessment methodology, consisting of seismic hazard, exposure, and vulnerability modules, and develop and maintain decision-support computer software tools for assessing earthquake risk impact in East African countries. You will also extend the developed earthquake risk impact assessment method to consider other earthquake-induced hazards, such as liquefaction and landslide. In close collaboration with other team members and project partners in East African countries, you will produce seismic hazard-risk maps, site-specific seismic design spectra, and seismic design guidelines.

The closing date for applications is September 17th

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/jobs/find/details.html?nPostingID=6431&nPostingTargetID=26214&option=28&sort=DESC&respnr=1&ID=Q50FK026203F3VBQBV7V77V83&LOV5=8070&LOV3=8488&Resultsperpage=10&lg=UK&mask=uobext.

In addition to these duties, the Research Associates will be expected to produce work of publishable quality for appropriate high-quality peer-reviewed journals, present papers at national and international meetings and contribute to the development of collaborative research grants.

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Please note, new job announcements (usually) will be distributed to the GeoPRISMS Listserv on the 1st and 15th of each month.

Job Posting: Faculty Position

Tenure-Track Faculty Solid Earth Geochemistry/Petrology – The Department of Geosciences at The Pennsylvania State University

The Department of Geosciences at The Pennsylvania State University invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the Assistant Professor level in Solid Earth Geochemistry. We seek a colleague who creatively uses theoretical, observational, analytical and/or experimental approaches to address fundamental problems related to the mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry of the solid Earth.

Candidates with expertise in planets and meteorites will also be considered. Successful applicants will be expected to contribute to a diverse research and teaching community in the Department of Geosciences through the development of a vigorous, internationally recognized and externally funded research program, and through teaching courses in their discipline at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The Department of Geosciences is part of the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, and houses research programs and state-of-the-art analytical facilities spanning a broad spectrum of Earth Science disciplines (further information is available at: http://www.geosc.psu.edu).

Applicants must have a Ph.D. in geosciences or a related field at the time of appointment. Applicants should submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, a statement of professional interests (research and teaching), and the names and contact information of three references. These materials must be submitted online. Appointment may begin as early as July 1, 2018. Review of applications will begin on September 1, 2017, and continue until the position is filled. For further information or questions, please contact Jim Kasting, Chair of the Search Committee at jfk4@psu.edu.

Apply online at http://apptrkr.com/977649

Penn State is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, and is committed to providing employment opportunities to all qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or protected veteran status.

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Please note, new job announcements (usually) will be distributed to the GeoPRISMS Listserv on the 1st and 15th of each month.

Job Posting: PhD & Department Head Positions


1) PhD position to study Glacial Isostatic Adjustment in Patagonia – Southern Methodist University

2) Department Head Position – Penn State University
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1) PhD position to study Glacial Isostatic Adjustment in Patagonia – Southern Methodist University

One PhD position is available at the Roy Huffington Department of Earth Sciences at Southern Methodist University, beginning January 1, 2018. The project is funded by the NSF for 4 years and involves the study of glacial isostatic adjustment of the Southern Patagonia Icefield through passive- and active-source seismology, coring and analysis of lacustrine sediment and geodynamic modeling. The student will be part of a multi institutional team that collaborates on the project. The position will involve field data collection as well as data analysis, modeling and interpretation. The ability to travel internationally and to perform tasks in the field is required.

Admission requirements and procedures are available at:

http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/Academics/Departments/EarthSciences/Academics/Graduate-Studies

Interested students should contact Dr. Magnani at mmagnani@smu.edu for more information. In your email please include your CV, research interests and motivation for the position.

The graduate program at the Huffington Department of Earth Sciences at SMU provides research experience to prepare students for successful careers. Graduate research is facilitated by state-of-the-art laboratories that complement active field-based research programs.

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2) Department Head Position – Penn State University

Dear Colleagues,

The Department of Geosciences at The Pennsylvania State University invites nominations and applications for a dynamic, innovative, and visionary leader for the position of Department Head. The successful candidate is expected to be dedicated to promoting inclusion, cohesion, and excellence in the research and educational programs within the Department and across the College. The successful candidate is also expected to continue their strong record of cutting-edge scholarship and be qualified for appointment with tenure. The position is open to any area of research interest within Geosciences. Previous experience in academic or professional leadership is desirable. Women and members of under-represented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. Penn State Geosciences includes multiple top-ranked research and educational programs, and faculty who are international leaders in a broad array of fields. The Department has strong ties to programs across the University, including the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, the Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment, and the Materials Research Institute, numerous leading disciplinary programs, and interdisciplinary training programs in Energy, Astrobiology, Biogeochemistry, and Climate Science. More information is available on our website (www.geosc.psu.edu). To apply, applicants should upload the following materials through the PSU jobs website: 1) a letter describing how they would lead the Department and contribute to its teaching, service, and research programs; 2) a complete curriculum vitae; 3) names and addresses (including e-mail) of three referees. Review of applications will begin October 15, 2017, but applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Questions about the position should be directed to Dr. Kate Freeman, Chair, Department Head Search Committee, Department of Geosciences, at khf4@psu.edu.

Please visit the online application site for more information and to apply: https://psu.jobs/job/73257

Best,

Erin DiMaggio

Department of Geosciences
Pennsylvania State University
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Please note, new job announcements (usually) will be distributed to the GeoPRISMS Listserv on the 1st and 15th of each month.

Job Posting: Faculty & Postdoc Positions


1) Postdoctoral Research Scientist position – Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University

2) Tenure-Track Assistant Professor in Tectonics – School of Earth and Ocean Sciences (SEOS) at the University of Victoria

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1) Postdoctoral Research Scientist position – Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University

The Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University invites applications for a Postdoctoral Research Scientist to study lava flow emplacement using numerical methods.

Candidates should have a PhD in geophysics, applied math/physics, computer science or related fields. Experience with numerical modeling and computational fluid mechanics is important. Knowledge of volcanology is preferred but not required.

Appointment will be for 1 year, with continuation pending funding and progress.

Search will remain open for at least 30 days after the ad appears and will continue until the position is filled.

Please visit our online application site at:

https://academicjobs.columbia.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=64967

for further information about this position and to submit your application, curriculum vitae, and names and email addresses of three references.

Columbia University benefits offered with this Officer of Research appointment.

Columbia University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer– Race/Gender/Disability/Veteran.

We accept online applications only.

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2) Tenure-Track Assistant Professor in Tectonics

The School of Earth and Ocean Sciences (SEOS) at the University of Victoria invites applications for a Tenure Track Assistant Professor position in tectonics, to commence as early as July 2018. We seek applicants whose research encompasses field-based investigations in the general field of tectonics, and who use the geological record in any of the following disciplines: structural geology, sedimentology, geochemistry, geochronology, or tectonic geomorphology. Research areas can include, but are not limited to, feedbacks between tectonics and climate, paleogeography, thermochronology, paleoaltimetry, neotectonics, or tectonic evolution across Earth history. We particularly seek candidates who work in or will develop a research focus that examines the processes and evolution of the Earth System. SEOS emphasizes an Earth Systems Science approach, and the ideal candidate will be able to interact broadly with faculty who specialize in solid-earth, earth-surface, ocean, and atmosphere processes.

The successful candidate will develop a vigorous, independent, externally-funded research program that complements existing strengths in the School. It is also expected that the candidate will supervise undergraduate and graduate students and teach undergraduate and graduate courses, in particular, geological field schools, global tectonics, structural geology and other core geology courses, and actively contribute to departmental initiatives.   A PhD is required at the time of appointment and post-doctoral experience is desirable. Commensurate with their career stage, qualified candidates must have an excellent record of research published in or in preparation for leading scientific journals. Effective teaching and student supervision are expected, supported by evidence which may include past experience, references, a teaching statement (see below), and the presentation of a candidacy seminar.

Applications, in a single pdf file, should include a letter of application, a detailed curriculum vitae, contact information (name, address, email) for three references, a two-page statement describing the applicant’s teaching experience and philosophy, and a two-page statement describing their current and future research interests/direction. Applications or requests for further information should be sent electronically to Dr. Stan Dosso, Director, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences at seos@uvic.ca. Review of applications will begin on October 1, 2017, and will continue until a suitable candidate is identified. Information about SEOS can be found at www.uvic.ca/science/seos/.

Faculty at the University of Victoria are governed by the provisions of the Collective Agreement (www.uvic.ca/vpacademic/assets/docs/Collective%20Agreement.pdf). Members are represented by the University of Victoria Faculty Association (www.uvicfa.ca).  The University of Victoria is an equity employer and encourages applications from women, persons with disabilities, visible minorities, Aboriginal Peoples, people of all sexual orientations and genders, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of the University. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

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Please note, new job announcements (usually) will be distributed to the GeoPRISMS Listserv on the 1st and 15th of each month.

More sessions of interest at the 2017 AGU Fall Meeting


Please see below for more sessions of interest to the GeoPRISMS Community, taking place at the 2017 AGU Fall Meeting, December 11-15 in New Orleans, LA. AGU abstract submission deadline is Wednesday Aug. 2 at 23:59 EDT

https://fallmeeting.agu.org/2017/

Submit your abstract: https://fallmeeting.agu.org/2017/abstract_overview/abstract-submissions/

Your session is not listed? Email us at info@geoprisms.org and we’ll be happy to include your session to the list.

T013: Exploring the Characteristics and Dynamics of Oceanic Plates Entering Subduction Zones
T022: Integrated view of the Gulf of California and adjacent western Mexico and U.S.A. plate boundary: Tectonics, geophysics, structure, volcanology, petrology, stratigraphy and sedimentology, paleontology, geomorphology, geochronology, ore deposits and hydrothermal vents, and marine geology 
T037: Subduction Top to Bottom 2, with a Caribbean Flavor
T047: Transform Plate Boundaries: Mechanics and Hazards

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T013: Exploring the Characteristics and Dynamics of Oceanic Plates Entering Subduction Zones

Session ID#: 24328

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/preliminaryview.cgi/Session24328

Session Description:

Oceanic plates entering subduction zones play a key role in transporting material from Earth’s surface to the deep interior. In the last decade, several marine geophysical studies have revealed new high-resolution observations of bending-induced normal faults and additional structural variations suggesting infiltration of water into the crust and mantle of the downgoing plate. This session aims to highlight these findings as well as examine the relationship between large outer-rise earthquakes, megathrust events, compositional variations in the incoming plate and forearc, and the tectonic forces acting on the downgoing plate and the plate boundary interface. We also welcome presentations based on geophysical and geological studies of incoming oceanic plates, analyses of rock samples, effects of plate  bending on the earth’s volatile cycle and igneous activities in the incoming plate, and numerical modeling studies that aim to elucidate the key tectonic processes within the incoming plate.

Conveners: Shuichi Kodaira (JAMSTEC), Douglas Wiens (Washington University in St Louis), Asuka Yamaguchi (University of Tokyo) and John Naliboff (University of California Davis)

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T022: Integrated view of the Gulf of California and adjacent western Mexico and U.S.A. plate boundary: Tectonics, geophysics, structure, volcanology, petrology, stratigraphy and sedimentology, paleontology, geomorphology, geochronology, ore deposits and hydrothermal vents, and marine geology

Session ID#: 25313

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/preliminaryview.cgi/Session25313

Session description:

The Gulf of California and the surrounding parts of western Mexico, and the Salton Trough and surrounding parts of the USA, form an ideal natural laboratory for studying a very broad spectrum of inter-related geological and geophysical processes. Prior AGU sessions have focused on particular aspects, such as tectonophysics or marine geology, but all of the topics listed in the title for this session can be better understood when considering advances in the other topics listed therein. The new venue for 2017 (New Orleans) can attract a broader spectrum of researchers than those that normally attend AGU. Now is the time to synthesize results in a multi-disciplinary session that will attract workers in all aspects of the geology and geophysics of the Gulf of California/Salton Trough and adjacent western Mexico and U.S. region. We solicit posters from a very broad base, and especially encourage interdisciplinary contributions.

Conveners: Cathy Busby (University of California Davis), Raquel Negrete-Aranda (CICESE National Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education of Mexico), Joann Stock (California Institute of Technology), and Paul Umhoefer (Northern Arizona University)

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T037: Subduction Top to Bottom 2, with a Caribbean Flavor

Session ID#: 22904

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/preliminaryview.cgi/Session22904

Session Description:

From top-to-bottom, many geological, geophysical, petrologic/geochemical, and theoretical advances have been made toward understanding subduction zone processes and dynamics since AGU geophysical monograph “Subduction Top to Bottom” was published 20 years ago. This session and a related themed issue in GEOSPHERE are intended to revisit the issues that were explored in the 1996 publication and re-assess them in light of recent advancements as well as explore new discoveries and advances in subduction zone research. We invite the broadest possible range of contributions, including subduction-related hazards (volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and tsunamis) and resources, and we encourage contributions regarding Caribbean subduction.

Conveners: Gray E Bebout (Lehigh University), David W Scholl (USGS Geological Survey, Menlo Park), Robert J Stern (Univ Texas Dallas) and Philippe Agard (University Pierre and Marie Curie Paris VI)

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T047: Transform Plate Boundaries: Mechanics and Hazards

Session ID#: 26428

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/preliminaryview.cgi/Session26428

Session Description:

Transform plate boundaries offer a window into the mechanical deformation of lithosphere absent of external mantle processes (corner flow, upwelling). Continental transforms also present significant hazards due to their proximity to population centers. A variety of deformation styles occur at transform plate boundaries, particularly at fault stepovers, endpoints, and in oblique zones. Recent ruptures of transform faults including the Kekerengu Fault of New Zealand and the Queen Charlotte Fault of western North America highlight the need for improved understanding of the mechanics and deformation processes associated with transform systems. We seek contributions highlighting new results from the recent Kaikoura earthquake and studies of the Queen Charlotte Fault, the San Andreas Fault, the North Anatolian Fault, and the Alpine Fault. We emphasize the importance of multi- and cross-disciplinary approaches to study transform systems and welcome broad contributions, especially research involving earthquake seismology, paleoseismology, marine geology and geophysics, tectonic geomorphology, and geodesy.

Conveners: Maureen Walton (USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center Santa Cruz), Uri ten Brink (USGS Coastal and Marine Science Center Woods Hole), Nathan Miller (USGS Coastal and Marine Science Center Woods Hole), Danny Brothers (USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center Santa Cruz)

Sessions of Interest at the 2017 AGU Fall Meeting


Please see below for sessions of interest to the GeoPRISMS Community, taking place at the 2016 AGU Fall Meeting, December 11-15 in New Orleans, LA. AGU abstract submission deadline is Wednesday August 2 at 23:59 EDT.

https://fallmeeting.agu.org/2017/

Submit your abstract: https://fallmeeting.agu.org/2017/abstract_overview/abstract-submissions/

Your session is not listed? Email us at info@geoprisms.org and we’ll be happy to include your session to the list.

T005: Breaking Up is Never Easy: Why Do Some Rifts Fail and Others Succeed?
T007: Continental Rifts and Passive Margins: Geology, Geophysics, Geodynamics
T011: Eastern North American Margin: Multidisciplinary Studies
T015: Fluid migration through subduction zones: observations and the consequences on geodynamic processes and natural hazards
T016: Geochemical Evolution of Convergent Margins from Asthenosphere to Atmosphere
T028: New Insights On The Cascadia Subduction Zone From Offshore And Amphibious Studies
T032. Role of Pre-Existing Structures on Plate Deformation in Continental Rifting and Subduction Zones
T036: Subduction Dynamics Across the Scales
S035: Seismically surveying North America: synthesis and emerging ideas as USArray spans Alaska and the CCArray initiative builds momentum

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T005: Breaking Up is Never Easy: Why Do Some Rifts Fail and Others Succeed?

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/preliminaryview.cgi/Session22413

Session ID: 22413

Session Description:

The breakup of continents is a fundamental process of plate tectonics. However, we have not yet identified the crucial ingredients that permit complete rupture of strong continental lithosphere. Studies of continental breakup are biased towards success¬ stories – rifts that evolve to oceanic spreading. Some extension episodes cease before this point, presumably in the absence of some fundamental process, initial condition(s), or forcing. Investigations of “failed rifts” may help isolate key processes or conditions that enable continental breakup, particularly when compared to successful examples. Outstanding questions include: Does rift success/failure depend on intrinsic or far-field properties? How do pre-existing structure, magma, and volatiles influence rift initiation, continuation, and extinction? Are failed rifts actually “paused rifts” that can later be reactivated? Do analogous mechanical controls apply to extinct seafloor spreading centers? We solicit contributions from diverse geoscience perspectives, including geodesy, geodynamics, geochemistry/petrology, volcanology, structural geology and seismology.

Invited Speakers:

Carol A. Stein – University of Illinois at Chicago
Sascha Brune – GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences

We look forward to seeing you in New Orleans!

Zach Eilon, Natalie Accardo, James Muirhead, Sarah Stamps

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T007: Continental Rifts and Passive Margins: Geology, Geophysics, Geodynamics

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/preliminaryview.cgi/Session22111

Session ID#: 22111

Session Description:

This session invites contributions on rifts and rifted margins that integrate new data sets, approaches or viewpoints. Studies can range from the outcrop to the basin or lithospheric plate scale, and include global examples. Innovative concepts and techniques based on field geology, seismology, geodesy, marine geophysics, plate reconstructions, geochemistry, sedimentology, or modeling are encouraged. Topics may include but are not limited to fault dynamics, shear zones, tectono-magmatic and sedimentary processes, impact of volatiles, the continent-ocean transition, influence of mantle dynamics and surface processes, and the role of tectonic inheritance. We particularly encourage submissions that explore along-strike structural and magmatic variations in rifts and passive margins linked to 3D modeling studies. Emphasis will be given to presentations conveying an integrated picture by bridging spatial or temporal scales, or by combining results from active rifts, failed rift arms, passive margins or fossil rifted margins exposed in mountain belts.

Conveners: Sascha Brune (Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences), W Roger Buck (Columbia University of New York, LDEO), Patricia Persaud (Louisiana State University), and Gianreto Manatschal (University of Strasbourg)

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T011: Eastern North American Margin: Multidisciplinary Studies

Session ID#: 24298

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/preliminaryview.cgi/Session24298

Session Description:

The Eastern North American Margin (ENAM) records a complex geologic and tectonic history, encompassing two complete Wilson cycles from supercontinent assembly to breakup over the past ~1.3 billion years. It is a natural laboratory to examine the orogenic histories, the lithospheric behavior, and the interaction between crust and upper mantle beneath passive margins, which are fundamental for our understanding of plate tectonics in general. This session invites multidisciplinary contributions from geology, geophysics, tectonics, and geodynamics on the ENAM with new datasets, new methods, new models, and new ideas, with particular interests of the integrated results from multiple disciplines on the study of the 3-D geometry and the tectonic evolutions of this passive margin. Topics may include but are not limited to understanding of the tectonic history of orogenic processes, the crustal and upper mantle structures and dynamics, the nature and origin of magmatic activities and the links to tectonic processes.

Conveners: 

Xiaotao Yang (University of Massachusetts Amherst), Cong Li (University of Massachusetts Amherst), Michael L Williams (University of Massachusetts Amherst), Vadim L Levin (Rutgers University)

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T015: Fluid migration through subduction zones: observations and the consequences on geodynamic processes and natural hazards

Session ID#: 25865

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/preliminaryview.cgi/Session25865

Session Description:

Water plays a vital role in the Earth’s evolution. At subduction plate boundaries, vast quantities of fluid are exchanged between the Earth, ocean and atmosphere; however, water transport through subduction zones is only partially understood. Volatile cycling is fundamental to the petrogenesis and eruption of arc magmas. Fluids and dehydration reactions may also play a key role in the earthquake cycle. This session will address some key scientific questions of volatile cycling. What is the role of the slab mantle as a vessel for transporting water into the subduction zone? What are the pathways of volatiles through the subduction system thereby impacting geodynamic processes (e.g. mantle flow)? How are volatile pathways manifested in seismic, volcanic and mineralization potential? We welcome contributions from a range of studies on diverse subduction environments from various disciplines (e.g., but not limited to: geophysical imaging, rock physics, geochemistry, geodynamic modelling).

Conveners: Stephen Paul Hicks (University of Southampton), Lidong Bie (University of Liverpool, Liverpool), Andreas Rietbrock (University of Liverpool)

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T016: Geochemical Evolution of Convergent Margins from Asthenosphere to Atmosphere

Session ID#: 21897

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/preliminaryview.cgi/Session21897

Do you have an interest in the climate-tectonic-magmatic-biologic evolution of Andean-type margins and their effects on the Earth system?

We invite you to submit an abstract to the topical session “Geochemical Evolution of Convergent Margins from Asthenosphere to Atmosphere” at this year’s AGU Fall Meeting in New Orleans, LA (Dec. 11-15, 2017). We aim to bring together a diverse group of geochemists tackling interdisciplinary questions at modern and ancient convergent margins.

Invited Speakers: Cin-Ty Lee (Rice University) and Carina Hoorn (University of Amsterdam).

The session description is below. We hope to see you in New Orleans!

Cheers,

Kendra Murray, Mauricio Ibañez-Mejia, & Alexander Rohrmann

Session Description:

The importance of links between processes in the mantle, crust, hydrosphere, and atmosphere at convergent margins is increasingly clear, but the mechanisms, timescales, and even directionality of these connections remain poorly understood. These interactions influence the growth, recycling, and destruction of the lithosphere; induce rapid shifts in surface elevation and produce high topography that can affect atmospheric circulation; and drive feedbacks between precipitation, rock deformation, uplift, basin development, landscape evolution, and biologic change. Furthermore, convergent margins generate the planet’s largest earthquakes and modulate greenhouse-gas budgets via volcanism and chemical weathering. In this session, we aim to bridge temporal, spatial, and disciplinary gaps between geochemical studies of Andean-type margins. We invite contributions that place the geochemistry of modern and ancient convergent margins within the context of these interactions. We particularly welcome multi-method approaches that include geochronology, thermochronology, cosmogenic nuclide-dating, stable isotope measurements, leaf-wax lipid-biomarkers, or other biological proxies.

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T028: New Insights On The Cascadia Subduction Zone From Offshore And Amphibious Studies

Session ID#: 24812

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/preliminaryview.cgi/Session24812

Session Description:

Subduction zones, one of Earth’s fundamental tectonic environments, play a key role in many Earth processes. Consequently, they require study by interdisciplinary methods. However, our understanding of subduction zones has been limited by a lack of offshore and amphibious data. At the Cascadia subduction zone, new data collected over the last several years have helped close this gap, elucidating a wide range of new insights, including the structure of the incoming lithosphere, the role of water and volatiles in the subducting plate, asthenospheric flow above and below the subducting lithosphere, the transition from locking to slipping behavior along the plate interface, and the nature of episodic tremor and slip. We invite contributions broadly related to Cascadia geoscience that focus on new results from seismology, magnetotellurics, geodesy, geodynamics, hazards, paleoseismology, geochemisty and petrology, with particular emphasis on insights gained from the contribution of offshore and amphibious data.

Conveners:  Helen A Janiszewski (Columbia University of New York), William Bythewood Hawley (University of California Berkeley), Kerry Key (Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics La Jolla), and Matthew James Cook, Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

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T032. Role of Pre-Existing Structures on Plate Deformation in Continental Rifting and Subduction Zones

Session ID: 27474

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/preliminaryview.cgi/Session27474

Session Description:

This session seeks to discuss the current state of knowledge of plate deformation in continental rifting and subduction zones as affected by the presence of pre-existing structures. Studies have shown how strain is accommodated along pre-existing structures, and how geological hazards are localized where the older structures are present. Other studies have shown how pre-existing structures are not important in the formation of new faults. Understanding the effects of these older structures are important to comprehend seismic hazards, plate kinematics, initiation and evolution of continental rifting, subduction initiation, and strain partitioning in subduction zones. We seek contributions that use geophysical (seismic, geodetic, remote sensing, potential fields), numerical and/or analog modeling, and geological techniques to understand strain accommodation, geologic hazards, subduction processes, deformation history, and plate kinematics, as affected by pre-existing structures. This session also encourages contributions on future research directions on strain accommodation on continental rifting and subduction zones.

Sincerely,

Daniel A. Laó-Dávila, Estella A. Atekwana, and Mohamed Abdelsalam

Oklahoma State University

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T036: Subduction Dynamics Across the Scales

Session ID#: 25133

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/preliminaryview.cgi/Session25133

Session Description:

Subduction zones display a wide variety of tectonic and earthquake behaviors across a range of timescales. Seismic tomography, laboratory and numerical models have helped to understand plate boundary evolution at the geological time-scale. However many aspects of short-term subduction dynamics remain unclear. The series of thrust megathrust earthquakes of the last 15 years, besides highlighting the social relevance of geodynamic studies, has opened a window into the dynamics of subduction zones at the seismic cycle time-scale. The combination of seismic, geodetic and numerical modeling has helped to understand the physical characteristics of the megathrust earthquakes and the role of the fault geometry, temperature, fluid circulation, petrology and seismic/aseismic energy partitioning to the dynamics convergent margins. We welcome contributions from geodynamicists, seismologists, geodesists and geologists aiming at exploring the relationship between subduction zone dynamics and seismic cycle.

Conveners: Gabriele Morra (University of Louisiana at Lafayette), Emma Hill (Earth Observatory of Singapore), Thorsten W Becker (University of Texas at Austin, Austin), and Ylona van Dinther (ETH Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich)

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S035: Seismically surveying North America: synthesis and emerging ideas as USArray spans Alaska and the CCArray initiative builds momentum

Session ID#: 24626

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/preliminaryview.cgi/Session24626

Session Description:

A systematic broadband seismic survey of an entire continent is a former pipe dream from the seismology community that has recently made major steps toward reality. The EarthScope program’s USArray Transportable Array has successfully covered the contiguous 48 states of the US, and is just reaching its maximum extent in Alaska and northwestern Canada. This session welcomes studies striving to synthesize new insights into continental structure, wave propagation, and seismic sources illuminated by comprehensive coverage of the contiguous US, as well as studies with nascent results and hypotheses from Alaska and northwestern Canada. Coverage of North America remains incomplete and the growing CCArray initiative may offer an opportunity to connect the existing broadband data sets by systematically sampling the Canadian Cordillera. Studies with relevance to the potential science targets, design, and capabilities of the CCArray concept are encouraged.

Conveners: Brandon Schmandt (University of New Mexico), Scott Burdick (University of Maryland College Park), Pascal Audet (University of Ottawa), and Emily Hopper (Brown University)

Reminder: Apply to host a GeoPRISMS Distinguished Speaker


GeoPRISMS Distinguished Lectureship Program (DLP), 2017 – 2018

Deadline: July 10, 2017

> Download the brochure

> Apply now

DLP
The GeoPRISMS Office is happy to announce the annual GeoPRISMS Distinguished Lectureship Program for academic year 2017-2018 with an outstanding speakers list. Distinguished scientists involved with GeoPRISMS science are available to visit US colleges and universities to present technical and public lectures on subjects related to GeoPRISMS science.
Any US college or university can apply to host a DLP speaker. Applications are due July 10, 2017 for visiting speakers in Fall 2017 and Spring 2018. Institutions that are not currently involved with GeoPRISMS research are strongly encouraged to apply, including those granting undergraduate or masters degrees, as well as those with PhD programs. Institutions may request a technical and/or public lecture. The GeoPRISMS Office will cover airfare for speakers’ travel and will coordinate travel and off-site logistics. Host institutions are responsible for local expenses for the duration of the visit.
Visit the GeoPRISMS website to apply and learn more about the speakers and talks available:
Also, please review the DLP Best Practices for making the most of your visiting speaker:
Please direct any questions to the GeoPRISMS Office at info@geoprisms.org
 The GeoPRISMS Office
——————————————————–
2017-2018 Speakers:
Cynthia Ebinger (Tulane University)
Public Lecture: Recipe for continental rifting: Flavors of East Africa
Technical Lecture: Earthquakes within continental plates: How, where, and why it matters
Esteban Gazel (Cornell University)
Public Lecture: The rocks that joined the Americas: Is there a connection with climate and evolution of life?
Technical Lecture: Making young continents in arcs
Heather Savage (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)
Public lecture: The science and pseudoscience of earthquake prediction
Technical lecture: Understanding deformation in fault zones over multiple seismic cycles
Brandon Schmandt (University of New Mexico)
Public Lecture: Exploring the roots of volcanoes with seismology
Technical Lecture: Investigation of Mount St. Helens earthquakes and magma plumbing with a hybrid natural and controlled source seismic survey

USGS Publication: Reducing risk where tectonic plates collide


The USGS has just published a new blueprint for advancing science and resilience related to subduction zone hazards, entitled Reducing Risk Where Tectonic Plates Collide – A Plan to Advance Subduction Zone Science. This new Plan describes how the USGS may leverage scientific and technologic developments, address its stakeholder needs, and maximize capabilities through partnerships – with the overall goal of reducing the risks posed by subduction zone events.  The Plan is featured on the USGS main webpage, and a quick summary of the Plan is provided in an accompanying Fact Sheet (written for a general audience).

URLs for viewing and downloads:

GeoPRISMS Newsletter Available: Spring 2017


GeoPRISMS Newsletter Spring 2017 issue

Click the banner to read the Spring 2017 issue of the GeoPRISMS newsletter

The Spring edition of the GeoPRISMS newsletter include a  “Report from the Field” from Ninfa Bennington and Kerry Key on their work on arc melt generation beneath Okmok Volcano, and a Science Report from Anne Bécel on her investigation of the breakup and spreading history of the Eastern North American Margin.
This edition also includes:
  • NSF Update and Program Solicitation
  • Recent GeoPRISMS NSF Awards
  • GSOC Highlights – Spring 2017
  • Workshop Report – Theoretical & Experimental Institute for the RIE Initiative
  • Distinguished Lectureship Program Speakers 2017-2018
  • GeoPRISMS Data Portal Status Report
  • GeoPRISMS activities at the AGU Fall Meeting 2016
Printed copies of the newsletter will be mailed soon.
The GeoPRISMS Office

Apply to host a GeoPRISMS Distinguished Speaker


GeoPRISMS Distinguished Lectureship Program (DLP), 2017 – 2018

Deadline: July 10, 2017

Download the brochure

Apply now

DLP

The GeoPRISMS Office is happy to announce the annual GeoPRISMS Distinguished Lectureship Program for academic year 2017-2018 with an outstanding speakers list. Distinguished scientists involved with GeoPRISMS science are available to visit US colleges and universities to present technical and public lectures on subjects related to GeoPRISMS science.

Any US college or university can apply to host a DLP speaker. Applications are due July 10, 2017 for visiting speakers in Fall 2017 and Spring 2018. Institutions that are not currently involved with GeoPRISMS research are strongly encouraged to apply, including those granting undergraduate or masters degrees, as well as those with PhD programs. Institutions may request a technical and/or public lecture. The GeoPRISMS Office will cover airfare for speakers’ travel and will coordinate travel and off-site logistics. Host institutions are responsible for local expenses for the duration of the visit.

Visit the GeoPRISMS website to apply and learn more about the speakers and talks available:

http://geoprisms.org/education/distinguished-lectureship-program/

Also, please review the DLP Best Practices for making the most of your visiting speaker:

http://geoprisms.org/education/distinguished-lectureship-program/best-practices/

Please direct any questions to the GeoPRISMS Office at info@geoprisms.org

The GeoPRISMS Office

——————————————————–

2017-2018 Speakers:

Cynthia Ebinger (Tulane University)
Public Lecture: Recipe for continental rifting: Flavors of East Africa
Technical Lecture: Earthquakes within continental plates: How, where, and why it matters
Esteban Gazel (Cornell University)
Public Lecture: The rocks that joined the Americas: Is there a connection with climate and evolution of life?
Technical Lecture: Making young continents in arcs
Heather Savage (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)
Public lecture: The science and pseudoscience of earthquake prediction
Technical lecture: Understanding deformation in fault zones over multiple seismic cycles
Brandon Schmandt (University of New Mexico)
Public Lecture: Exploring the roots of volcanoes with seismology
Technical Lecture: Investigation of Mount St. Helens earthquakes and magma plumbing with a hybrid natural and controlled source seismic survey